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Date

July 28, 2017

Goldmine Magazine A musical stroll down memory lane with love songs

While vintage popular music is the theme, this article will spotlight love songs — those that help us to express what is often hard to put into words.

The post A musical stroll down memory lane with love songs appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Discogs Blog Discogs Set-Ups: Check Out Our Turntables And Audio Gear

To celebrate the launch of the Gearogs Marketplace, and just for a little insight into what we do with all those records we’re buying, this month’s staff picks is exclusively and unashamedly about audio gear. We’re talking turntables, speakers, amps, mixers, right through to samplers, drum machines and effect pedals. Maybe it’s all the time […]

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The Real Mick Rock Thanks to The Daily for the great review! Don’t miss my new…

Discogs Blog Staff Set-Ups: Check Out Our Turntables And Audio Gear

To celebrate the launch of the Gearogs Marketplace, and just for a little insight into what we do with all those records we’re buying, this month’s staff picks is exclusively and unashamedly about audio gear. We’re talking turntables, speakers, amps, mixers, right through to samplers, drum machines and effect pedals. Maybe it’s all the time […]

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Classical-Music.com Opera

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Goldmine Magazine Reviews: Wrangler, From Nursery to Misery, Milk of the Tree, Thomas Leer, Fader, Tex Pistols, Sendelica, Focus Group, Soul of a Nation, Georgie Fame, Silhouettes & Statues, Toby Twirl

From Nursery to Misery Pixies in the Woods (LP) (Dark Entries) The Dark Entries label’s penchant for unearthing some truly visionary music from the underground that lay beneath the post-punk underground is so well-known today that it’s hard to be …

The post Reviews: Wrangler, From Nursery to Misery, Milk of the Tree, Thomas Leer, Fader, Tex Pistols, Sendelica, Focus Group, Soul of a Nation, Georgie Fame, Silhouettes & Statues, Toby Twirl appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Songlines World Music News WOMAD Charlton Park 2017: Thursday

Orchestra Baobab WOMAD

Photography by Tom Askew-Miller

After months of feverish excitement and anticipation, the 35th edition of WOMAD is off to a great start with Bixiga 70 and Orchestra Baobab

Kicking off proceedings in usual WOMAD tradition were the Malmesbury School Project – a group of local students who were joined by Sheelanagig on the Open Air Stage.

Following this, it was a quick dash over to the Big Red Tent to catch São Paulo big band Bixiga 70 who put on a terrific show. Their high-energy, big, bold brass sound went down a storm with the enthusiastic crowd clearly eager to get into festival party mode. It didn’t take long before they were doing a Brazilian style conga around the packed tent. Bixiga’s funky, highly danceable version of Afrobeat has a very particular Brazilian flavour to it, augmented by a superb duo of percussionists who almost stole the show with a blistering solo. The ten-piece band graciously gave fellow Brazilian group Metá Metá a plug – they’ll be performing later on today in the Big Red Tent.

An altogether more laid-back but charming performance from the Senegalese veterans Orchestra Baobab – the ideal mellow Thursday night closer.

Orchestra Baobab WOMAD

Things crank up considerably on Friday with a ridiculously full-on programme. Top of the list to check out are this month’s Songlines coverstar, Alsarah, who will be performing with her band the Nubatones on the Ecotricity stage. Unfortunately roots reggae group Inna de Yard were unable to secure visas in time for their performance on Friday, but their spot will be deftly filled by the ever-excellent Dele Sosimi.

Here’s hoping the weather behaves…

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Composer of the Week Mathias

Donald Macleod explores Mathias’s student days in Aberystwyth and London

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Jazzwise News

While the venue’s refit, which considerably extends the standing area downstairs, is not unwelcome – especially as this gig draws a good crowd – there are changes immediately noticed by musicians who grace the stage. The old Steinway is gone. Its absence is really felt in the second set when Nikki Yeoh‘s keyboard plays up a bit as the Denys Baptiste Quartet is in full flow. But there is also a sharp whiff of nostalgia for the missing ‘STFU’ sign, an acronymic rendering of a forthright request for silence, when some punters just would not stop talking for the upset of others.

Anyway, the first set by double bassist Gary Crosby and tenor saxophonist Steve Williamson is a fine opening to proceedings. Two players with a 40-year musical relationship, they display the requisite chemistry to triumph in a high risk setting. Then again their strength of character really shines through. Williamson’s stately, solid tone, its lack of vibrato grippingly stark at times, is entrancing, while Crosby’s swing and playfulness with time, resulting in more than one catcher’s catch can pause, works very well. A brisk walk through Miles’ ‘Nardis’ and a jaunt through Monk’s ‘Blue Monk’, where the bassist holds the tune and the saxophonist twists and tugs at countermelody with gymnastic turns of phrase, are notable. As for the reading of ‘Body & Soul’ it is a grand moment of drama, as both men wring exactly the right torrent of sentiment, the longing, ecstasy and agony, from a standard that has challenged all comers since Coleman Hawkins claimed ownership in 1938.

DenysBaptisteQrt DSF5443

Tenor saxophonist Denys Baptiste, who in the 1990s picked up the baton from Williamson, Crosby and other Jazz Warriors, is enjoying a very good year, having returned to the spotlight with his album The Late Trane, which offers an astute reading of some of the key moments of the closing chapter of John Coltrane’s epic journey through sound.

With double bassist Neil Charles, drummer Rod Youngs and the aforesaid keyboardist Yeoh he has an accomplished group at his disposal and it skillfully negotiates the central premise of Baptiste’s re-imagining: the beauty of the sometimes simple themes is drawn out and cast against accessible, often danceable rhythmic backdrops that are very British. Young’s use of a second snare drum produces all the whiplash thrust of drum & bass throughout the evening while his bouncing kick and hi-hat lines are mildly Latin-calypso, with Charles providing a steady anchor as the energy picks up. From pieces such as ‘Ascent’ to ‘Peace On Earth’ the songs are indeed heavenly, and Baptiste’s statement of melody and ensuing improvisations, their vaulting course given a misty shadow by his pedal board and octave divider, are highly effective.

The electro-acoustic sound palette is vaguely Joe Henderson circa Power To The People but the cheeky quotes of Miles’ ‘Jean-Pierre’ spread the references further. Having said that, the sparkling streams of single notes produced by Yeoh when she ‘unplugs’ on ‘After The Rain’ fully captivate, before Crosby and Williamson return for a rousing finale in which the doubling up of bass and horns brings forth all of the stormy density that marked Coltrane’s valedictory musical statements. Baptiste’s take is as personal as it is respectful to that spirit.

– Kevin Le Gendre

– Photos by Roger Thomas

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