Search

mandersmedia.co.uk

Retailers of Vinyl, CDs, DVDs etc. through Amazon, Ebay, Discogs, iHaveit, MusicStack and CD & LP. A friend of Help Musicians UK.

Date

February 4, 2019

falsepriest Worried About Disc Rot? Here’s How To Look After Your CDs

{
“@context”: “http://schema.org”,
“@type”: “blogPosting”,
“mainEntityOfPage”: “https://blog.discogs.com/en/say-no-to-disc-rot-how-to-look-after-cds/”,
“headline”: “Worried About Disc Rot? Here’s How To Look After Your CDs”,
“author”: “falsepriest”,
“datePublished”: “2017-02-08”,
“dateModified”: “2019-02-04”,
“image”:
{
“@type”: “imageObject”,
“url”: “http://blog.discogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/16667128_10154506408049403_1798606102_o.jpg”,
“height”: “665”,
“width”: “1184”
},
“publisher”:
{
“@type”: “Organization”,
“name”: “Discogs Blog”,
“logo”:
{
“@type”: “imageObject”,
“url”: “https://blog.discogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/discogs-logo-e1451320659600.png”
}
}
}

Disc rot affects CDs, DVDs or LaserDiscs in different ways depending on how they’re manufactured and structured. Generally speaking, disc rot occurs due to chemical reactions with the reflective layer of the disc, ultraviolet light damage, scratches that expose the delicate and corrosive layer to environmental factors, or the deterioration of manufacturing materials.

CDs are often touted as the most durable physical music format because of the lack of contact during playback, compared to vinyl records and cassette tapes. Hell, I’ll admit, that with the exception of surface abrasions, I thought there was little you could do to corrupt a compact disc. Check out the BBC’s Tomorrow World’s totally convincing demonstration of the marvels of the new CD format:

Which is why I was caught off guard when I came across this article on disc rot on Motherboard. Great, as if it wasn’t enough that my stylus is wearing out my records, and my tapes are all unspooled – now I have to worry about the degradation of my CDs, DVDs and LaserDiscs as well. In fact, no one knows how long CDs can last. The answer is dependent on a number of factors, including where the disc was manufactured and how it is stored.

So why have we been treating these flat plastic donuts as an indestructible format for music and video when really they’re a delicate, carefully balanced alchemy of audiovisual data?

CD Disc Rot

In the case of CDs, disc rot is the effect of oxidation of the reflective layer of the disc, resulting in what can look like bronze discoloration, or as one victim described it, “a constellation of pinpricks” in the data layer of the disc. As anyone who’s suffered the misfortune of a scratched or scuffed disc CD will know, it doesn’t take a hell of a lot of damage to render the disc unreadable, and once that data is gone, it’s gone for good. CD degradation can be caused by mishandling or improper storage, but disc rot is typically caused by a chemical reaction with the reflective layer of the disc.

DVD Disc Rot

Though they look almost identical to CDs, DVD structure is a little different, using a plastic disc over the reflective layer. This is good news if you get a scratch on your disc as it means it’s less likely to reach the reflective layer and expose it to environmental damage. However, because of this structure, they can also suffer from delamination, where layers of the disc separate. On the disc, delamination can look like a coffee stain. Poor case design has been blamed by some as the case for DVD disc rot. During playback, DVD disc rot appears as the picture pixelating or freezing in a specific spot, skipping, or again, becoming unplayable.

Is Blu-ray Safe from Disc Rot?

It seems less prevalent than for CD, DVD and LaserDisc, but it would be unwise to rule out Blu-ray disc rot. There are a few reports of disc rot on Blu-ray which has been described as ‘small mould blooms’ below the surface, rendering the disc unplayable.

Laser Rot

The name given to LaserDisc’s own special brand of disc rot suggests the laser is to blame – similar to stylus wear – but again, it’s just the degradation to the disc. Speckling in the video and crackling in the audio worsen as disc rot advances. It’s usually attributed to oxidation of the aluminum layers by poor quality adhesives used to bond the disc halves together. Single-sided discs rarely suffer as badly as double-sided discs do.
LaserDiscs from specific manufacturers seem more likely to fall prey to laser rot. MCA DiscoVision discs are notorious for it, as well as discs pressed at Sony DADC in Terra Haute. Conversely, manufacturers like Kuraray were well known for their meticulous practices and have seen few instances of laser rot, to date.

Can I Prevent Disc Rot?

Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be a surefire way to prevent disc rot due to many instances appearing due to manufacturing faults. However, proper care will help from exacerbating the problem, and it’s a timely reminder that your discs are by no means indestructible.
While some of the following tips are eye-wateringly obvious, they’re also often ignored. So let’s take it from the top.

Tips For The Correct Treatment Of Your Discs:

  • Handle your discs correctly, touching only the outer edges and hole in the center. While it’s probably second nature by now to be cautious with the reflective underside of discs, you should also be careful of the top, printed layer as damage to this side can also impact playback.
  • Store your discs in an upright position. Avoid keeping them in stacks, much like you would vinyl records. They should also be kept in a cool, dry environment.
  • Keep your discs in jewel- or keep cases rather than paper sleeves. Anchor the disc using the anchor pin in the center of the case. This is the best way to ensure you’re preventing scratches and damage inside the case. If the anchor pin is broken, it’s best to replace the case. Stick to one disc per case, and always return the disc to the case after play (e.g. don’t leave it on top of the stereo)
  • Label discs with a water-based marker. Hard tipped pens and chemicals can be abrasive and do damage to the data on the disc.
  • Check the quality of the disc before you buy – especially for secondhand discs. Look out for scratches, discoloration or what looks like pinpricks in the disc. If you’re buying recordables, spring for the higher quality version.

Discs made with gold as the reflective layer are less vulnerable to disc rot, as it’s a less corrosive material, though obviously, these are rarer than their (much cheaper) aluminum counterparts. And sadly, your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs are more likely to suffer from disc rot due to the type of organic dye used in recordables.

So the takeaway here is treat your discs well and they could last you a lifetime. Or they might not. I don’t know anymore, this disc rot thing has thrown my whole world into chaos.

Experienced the woes of disc rot on your CD, DVD, or LaserDisc collection? Tell us about it!

Passionate about physical media?
Join the Filmogs and Discogs communities of collectors.

The post Worried About Disc Rot? Here’s How To Look After Your CDs appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog http://bit.ly/2kmUsP4
via IFTTT

Advertisements

“It’s an energy thing. At the height of the moment, I say assassin because that’s what I feel…

via The Real Mick Rock http://bit.ly/2DSa3lT

Mark Kimber Classic Album Sundays Sydney Presents Miles Davis ‘In A Silent Way’

In February Classic Album Sundays celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Miles Davis’ brilliant, divisive and game-changing masterpiece.

In A Silent Way, released in 1969, marked a transitional moment, not only in Davis’s career but in the future development of jazz as a whole. Considered by many to be the first fusion recording, it also commenced the composer’s most divisive phase – commonly referred to as his “Electric Period”. This groundbreaking album would test latent tensions surrounding the future identity of jazz, its relationship with new technology, and the questions of authenticity which these contentious issues would draw into focus.

Whilst Davis was no longer the young, hip savant that he once was, his new relationship with the youthful singer Betty Maybry had renewed the composer’s interest in the contemporary pop landscape. Introducing Davis to the likes of The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Sly Stone, Maybry (alongside recommendations from drummer Tony Williams) would unknowingly guide the musician into one of the most distinctive and contentious eras of his work. Nonetheless, Davis’s transition towards this new palette was methodically considered, a culmination of ideas absorbed from collaborators and developed particularly through a new style of performance, which saw his band blend each separate compositions into one meandering flow of continuous music – a style stuck to rigorously until at least 1975.

Join us to experience the album as never before.

Sydney

Time and Date: Sunday 24th February 6:00pm – 9:30pm

Venue

The Beauchamp Hotel, 265 Oxford St; Darlinghurst, NSW 2010; Australia

Tickets

Available Here

Presenter

J.P. Ducharne (The Mancusian Circus), Jim Poe (Deep House Australia)

Audio Menu

Turntable: Rega RP6, Cartridge: Rega Exact, Amp: Accuphase E-202 Integrated Amplifier, Speakers: Klipsch Heresy, Subs: Klipsch R-10SW

The post Classic Album Sundays Sydney Presents Miles Davis ‘In A Silent Way’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

from Classic Album Sundays http://bit.ly/2GaqAUM
via IFTTT

CAS Classic Album Sundays Oslo presents Prince ‘Purple Rain’

Having released an album a year from 1978 through to 1982 (and having played songwriter, performer, producer and all the instruments on most) Prince was ready for a new direction. He put together a new band, The Revolution, and not only recorded a new album, but starred in a semi-biographical movie of the same name Purple Rain. The album was more of a collaborative effort with the band, and Wendy Melvoin (of The Revolution and later Wendy & Lisa) refers to the album as “a new beginning. Purple, the sky at dawn; rain, the cleansing factor.”

Join us to experience these albums as never before.

Oslo

Time & Date: 4th February 2019 19:00 (doors open at 18:30)

Venue

Laboratoriet (Kulturhuset), Youngs gate 6, 0181 Oslo

Tickets

NOK120/60 in the door or in advance

Presenters

Kent Horne with authors of Prince biography Shockadelica, artist Petter Aagaard and editor and label manager Christer Falck.

Audio Menu

The post Classic Album Sundays Oslo presents Prince ‘Purple Rain’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

from Classic Album Sundays http://bit.ly/2SrYp9x
via IFTTT

spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

Tomorrow’s Warriors’ role as a springboard for emerging talent in Britain has long co-existed with an inventive take on the history of jazz. Tonight’s event is really a perfect illustration of as much. The support slot unveils a quartet of very impressive youngsters – pianist Sultan Stevenson, drummer Cassius Cobbson, bassist Menelik Claffey, alto-saxophonist Donovan Haffner – whose tender years belie their ability. Presenting original material that draws on the core vocabularies of swing and fusion they play a short but dynamic set, with a good balance between ensemble dynamics and solo improvisation, which bodes well for the production line of new musicians from the ever-expanding TW hothouse helmed by Gary Crosby and Janine Irons.

To a large extent the Nu Civilisation Orchestra is one of the most ambitious strands of its activity. The 14-piece unit duly upholds the legacy of the great big bands of which Duke Ellington’s remains a paragon, but it makes an astute foray into the world of 1970s electric fusion by celebrating the songbook of the feted CTI label. Crucially, the NCO has strings as well as horns and rhythm section to convincingly produce the all important sheen and silkiness that characterised the many scores written by Don Sebesky for George Benson, Randy Weston and Freddie Hubbard, among others.

Peter Edwards conducts engaging new arrangements, some courtesy of Ben Burrell. That said, the cohesion of the large amount of musicians on stage makes the venture come to life, as there is a clear understanding of the balance the original artists struck between funky accessibility and finely wrought artistry. Which means that, on one hand, there is a sensitive touch in the rendition of Weston’s quite gorgeous ‘Ifrane’ and, on the other, a crisp attack on Grover Washington’s ‘Mister Magic’ that is enhanced by a vocal from Cherise Adams-Burnet. Guitarist Shirley Tetteh, trombonist Rosie Turton, trumpeter Ife Ogunjobi and bassist Jay Darwish all provide excellent solos, but it is really the melodies and grooves, having made such an impact on the rare groove and hip-hop scenes, which stand tall. If the evening opened on a high with Deodato’s ‘2001’ it didn’t come down on the closer, Hubbard’s ‘Red Clay’. It was recorded in the 1970s, sampled in the 1990s and is still rocking in the millennium.

Kevin Le Gendre
– Photo © Carl Hyde

 

from News http://bit.ly/2GmN2Jq
via IFTTT

spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

 RAM Hamish

There are some people, who I’ve never understood, who smirk at the mention of Steely Dan. “Oh,” they say, “that’s for people who like clever-clever chord changes, session musician name-dropping and impenetrable lyrics.” So, the news that the Royal Academy Big Band was lined up to honour the 40th birthday of the classic album Aja (two years too late, by my calculations) may have caused this misguided segment of society to roll their eyes: “Of course, the Academy, the conservatoire… not exactly rock’n’roll is it.” And, indeed, as the young big band assumed their places on stage they had an air of academic excellence about them, the trombone section resembling a particularly brilliant team off University Challenge.

But anyone with such suspect views would have been won over as soon as this magnificently talented unit kicked into ‘Babylon Sisters’, one of the greatest songs of the 20th century, no debate. With Hamish Stuart, the founder of the Average White Band no less, so comfortably stepping into the hard-to-fill shoes of Donald Fagen, the evening proved a revelation. I’ve never wanted to hear anyone but Fagen sing these sacred tracks, but Stuart met the challenge full on, bringing plenty of Fagen’s idiosyncratic slurring and whining, while adding his own phrasing and inflections to great effect. A trio of young singers complemented him impeccably: led by Sumudu Jayatilaka, often seen in Van Morrison’s touring band, they clearly enjoyed delivering the sassy backing lines so important to the Dan thing – “so outrageous” (‘Black Cow’); “you gotta shake it baby” (‘Babylon Sisters’); “go to Las Vegas” (or is it “lost wages”?) (‘Show Biz Kids’) and “the girls don’t seem to care” (‘FM’).

This was largely the project of trumpeter and composer Reuben Fowler, who took on purely a conducting role. His arrangements proved a total success, never obscuring or competing with the essence of the music, a clever balancing act; with many twists and turns echoing some of the live renditions heard on Steely Dan gigs since the band resumed touring back in the mid-1990s. Given the harmonic possibilities embedded in this music, ‘over-arranging’ may have been a problem in some hands, but not here. It would be easy to see Tom Scott himself (horn arranger on Aja) applauding these luscious, imaginative charts, in which Gareth Lockrane’s flute and piccolo was often prominent in the voicings.

It’s far from the first time that Dan tunes have been heard in a big-band setting: in 1978 the Woody Herman band, in a collaboration with Chick Corea, released a really interesting album including ‘Green Earrings’, ‘Aja’, ‘Kid Charlemagne’ and ‘FM’. Tom Scott was part of the sax section, alongside Joe Lovano, Gary Anderson and Frank Tiberi; Victor Feldman played keys along with Pat Coil and handled some of the arrangements with Alan Broadbent. And, only last month, drummer Jeremy Stacey took his outstanding Steely Dan big-band project to Ronnie Scott’s, which also featured Sumudu. Fagen and guitarist Walter Becker were always jazzers in any case, often opening sets with bursts of Maynard Ferguson’s ‘Fan it Janet’ and performing their superb version of Duke Ellington’s ‘East St Louis Toodle-Oo’.

Possibly the most intricate, adventurous and challenging-to-play arrangement was for ‘Gaslighting Abbie’, an underrated tune from Two Against Nature that was given extra legs by Fowler, even featuring a cute scatting interlude.
There were more surprises in the song choices: ‘Snowbound’ from Fagen’s Kamakiriad album is a neglected gem, soulfully delivered here by Stuart. This was followed by ‘Kulee Baba’, an unreleased track from the Gaucho sessions with an intro reminiscent of Weather Report’s ‘Birdland’.

The evening underlined just how extraordinary and timeless the Dan repertoire is; and how it connects through the generations. Amazingly talented young soloists like Alexander Bone (alto and soprano) and Harry Green paid homage to Pete Christlieb and Wayne Shorter respectively on ‘FM’ and ‘Aja’, and lovely guitar work on the latter did Denny Dias and Larry Carlton proud. And, yes, the Steve Gadd drum break was properly honoured.

For the encore we were treated to Stuart’s Average White Band classic ‘Pick Up The Pieces’. At first the more straightahead in-yer-face funk was a refreshing change after the multilayered Dan chicanery, but this was the arrangement by the legendary Arif Mardin and soon, with clever breakdowns, beautiful wide voicings, trumpet battle and the like we were back in Dan territory.

Fagen’s in town next month on yet another Dan tour. There’s no doubt he would have fully appreciated Fowler’s arrangements and the Academy band. But maybe his Dan partner, Becker, who passed away last year, was a presence – and looking down with interest and pride.

Adam McCulloch

from News http://bit.ly/2Sa62lq
via IFTTT

spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

 RAM Hamish

There are some people, who I’ve never understood, who smirk at the mention of Steely Dan. “Oh,” they say, “that’s for people who like clever-clever chord changes, session musician name-dropping and impenetrable lyrics.” So, the news that the Royal Academy Big Band was lined up to honour the 40th birthday of the classic album Aja (two years too late, by my calculations) may have caused this misguided segment of society to roll their eyes: “Of course, the Academy, the conservatoire… not exactly rock’n’roll is it.” And, indeed, as the young big band assumed their places on stage they had an air of academic excellence about them, the trombone section resembling a particularly brilliant team off University Challenge.

But anyone with such suspect views would have been won over as soon as this magnificently talented unit kicked into ‘Babylon Sisters’, one of the greatest songs of the 20th century, no debate. With Hamish Stuart, the founder of the Average White Band no less, so comfortably stepping into the hard-to-fill shoes of Donald Fagen, the evening proved a revelation. I’ve never wanted to hear anyone but Fagen sing these sacred tracks, but Stuart met the challenge full on, bringing plenty of Fagen’s idiosyncratic slurring and whining, while adding his own phrasing and inflections to great effect. A trio of young singers complemented him impeccably: led by Sumudu Jayatilaka, often seen in Van Morrison’s touring band, they clearly enjoyed delivering the sassy backing lines so important to the Dan thing – “so outrageous” (‘Black Cow’); “you gotta shake it baby” (‘Babylon Sisters’); “go to Las Vegas” (or is it “lost wages”?) (‘Show Biz Kids’) and “the girls don’t seem to care” (‘FM’).

This was largely the project of trumpeter and composer Reuben Fowler, who took on purely a conducting role. His arrangements proved a total success, never obscuring or competing with the essence of the music, a clever balancing act; with many twists and turns echoing some of the live renditions heard on Steely Dan gigs since the band resumed touring back in the mid-1990s. Given the harmonic possibilities embedded in this music, ‘over-arranging’ may have been a problem in some hands, but not here. It would be easy to see Tom Scott himself (horn arranger on Aja) applauding these luscious, imaginative charts, in which Gareth Lockrane’s flute and piccolo was often prominent in the voicings.

It’s far from the first time that Dan tunes have been heard in a big-band setting: in 1978 the Woody Herman band, in a collaboration with Chick Corea, released a really interesting album including ‘Green Earrings’, ‘Aja’, ‘Kid Charlemagne’ and ‘FM’. Tom Scott was part of the sax section, alongside Joe Lovano, Gary Anderson and Frank Tiberi; Victor Feldman played keys along with Pat Coil and handled some of the arrangements with Alan Broadbent. And, only last month, drummer Jeremy Stacey took his outstanding Steely Dan big-band project to Ronnie Scott’s, which also featured Sumudu. Fagen and guitarist Walter Becker were always jazzers in any case, often opening sets with bursts of Maynard Ferguson’s ‘Fan it Janet’ and performing their superb version of Duke Ellington’s ‘East St Louis Toodle-Oo’.

Possibly the most intricate, adventurous and challenging-to-play arrangement was for ‘Gaslighting Abbie’, an underrated tune from Two Against Nature that was given extra legs by Fowler, even featuring a cute scatting interlude.
There were more surprises in the song choices: ‘Snowbound’ from Fagen’s Kamakiriad album is a neglected gem, soulfully delivered here by Stuart. This was followed by ‘Kulee Baba’, an unreleased track from the Gaucho sessions with an intro reminiscent of Weather Report’s ‘Birdland’.

The evening underlined just how extraordinary and timeless the Dan repertoire is; and how it connects through the generations. Amazingly talented young soloists like Alexander Bone (alto and soprano) and Harry Green paid homage to Pete Christlieb and Wayne Shorter respectively on ‘FM’ and ‘Aja’, and lovely guitar work on the latter did Denny Dias and Larry Carlton proud. And, yes, the Steve Gadd drum break was properly honoured.

For the encore we were treated to Stuart’s Average White Band classic ‘Pick Up The Pieces’. At first the more straightahead in-yer-face funk was a refreshing change after the multilayered Dan chicanery, but this was the arrangement by the legendary Arif Mardin and soon, with clever breakdowns, beautiful wide voicings, trumpet battle and the like we were back in Dan territory.

Fagen’s in town next month on yet another Dan tour. There’s no doubt he would have fully appreciated Fowler’s arrangements and the Academy band. But maybe his Dan partner, Becker, who passed away last year, was a presence – and looking down with interest and pride.

Adam McCulloch

from News http://bit.ly/2Sa62lq
via IFTTT

C M Artist Of The Week: Run Logan Run

Hailing from Bristol, our Artist Of The Week is Run Logan Run. This duo–comprised of saxophonist Andrew Hayes and drummer Dan Johnson –toys with fragility and raw sonic power in their aural forms. Heavy, pounding drums work build into trance-inducing patterns whilst gutturally spastic saxophone adds a disorienting melancholia that at times pushes the duo’s post-jazz sound into excitingly dubbed-out realms. We’ve chosen “Death Is Elsewhere” from their stellar latest album The Delicate Balance of Terror for your listening pleasure below:

https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5QVE7cbxj3AndWAn56zdhS

The post Artist Of The Week: Run Logan Run appeared first on Richer Unsigned.

from Richer Unsigned http://bit.ly/2GkuR7j
via IFTTT

Goldmine1 The ‘Billy & Buzz Sing Buddy’ Goldmine Giveaway

Enter to win a new Buddy Holly tribute CD and read a pair of interviews with Billy Swan and Buzz Cason.

The post The ‘Billy & Buzz Sing Buddy’ Goldmine Giveaway appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

from Goldmine Magazine http://bit.ly/2HMCdmb
via IFTTT

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: