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Date

March 20, 2019

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loquearde 10 Expensive Post Rock Records

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Talking about post rock sometimes — well, most times — feels a bit weird. As much as we love bands normally associated with post rock, it feels like the term has been overused throughout the years to categorize a lot of rock music that didn’t quite fit anywhere else. Like many good things in life, the phrase was coined by critic and writer Simon Reynolds (Energy Flash, Rip It Up And Start Again) in his review of Bark Psychosis’ debut album Hex, published in the March 1994 issue of Mojo magazine.

Since it wasn’t popularized until ’94, you could argue there were artists doing post rock before post rock as an idea existed. Confusing, right? Over the next years, it began to morph as some acts borrowed elements from krautrock, ambient, IDM, jazz, minimalism, and even metal. At this point, most bands considered part of the movement weren’t necessarily marching in lockstep when it came to their sound.

Since this list isn’t meant to be a comprehensive analysis of the genre, we don’t want to proceed without mentioning a handful of post rock bands who also deserve your attention, like Tortoise, Stereolab, Mono, Talk Talk, Deafheaven, A Silver Mt. Zion, This Will Destroy You, Do Make Say Think, Gastr Del Sol, Battles, Boris, Flying Saucer Attack.

Here are 10 post rock records you’ll need to pay for in installments:

Slint

Slint were the most important pre-post-rock bands we mentioned earlier. Considered the godfathers of the genre, the Kentucky four-piece released their second and last record Spiderland on Touch And Go in 1991 (“the year punk broke”). The album paved the way for all the everyone to come. Back in those days, they followed the not-so-unfamiliar path that other trailblazing acts had: little recognition leading to the band breaking up. It’s as unfair as it sounds.

The six-track release is one of those few perfect albums out there; spoken word, quiet-loud-quiet structures, intriguing atmospheres, minimalistic arrangements. They did it many years before those features became common in the alternative rock scene. Never listened to them before? Go for Good Morning, Captain. It’s a life-changing song.

Slint’s most expensive record

You’d probably expect the first edition of Spiderland to be the most expensive Slint record, but the box set Touch And Go released in 2014 is currently going for as much as $500. Count yourself lucky if you bought your copy five years ago!

Bark Psychosis

Bark Psychosis only released one album in 1994 (before reuniting in 2004). That record, Hex (Circa, Caroline Records), is what helped Simon Reynolds come up with the nomenclature to describe the genre. Despite their small catalog, the London group became highly influential to many that followed in their footsteps. Their abstract approach to rock music, the use of synths, and the exquisite production set them apart from most of their peers.

Music magazines back then received the record with very enthusiastic reviews. Melody Maker described Hex as “unquestionably divine” and “a gorgeously intense 50 minutes.” NME referred to the band as “nothing less than completely captivating” and called the album “a thoroughly marvelous record.”

Bark Psychosis’ most expensive record

Fire Records released the band’s second (and last) album after the 2004 reunion, Codename: Dustsucker. Copies of this LP are going for as much as 550 (about $617).

Disco Inferno

Formed in east London as a four-piece in 1989, the tale of Disco Inferno is an unsung story of many underground bands that paved the way for the industry we know nowadays. Sensing a theme here? The criminally underrated, wildly experimental D.I. Go Pop (1994, Rough Trade) is a masterpiece of twisted beauty exploring new realms of sound.

Nowadays, we’re used to all sort of sampling techniques. Back in 1994, not so much. In Sharky Water featured water samples, Starbound: All Burnt Out & Nowhere To Go sampled camera flashes and children voices, A Crash At Every Speed used plenty of car and planes noises. This album was a blueprint for modern rock music in just 33 minutes.

Disco Inferno’s most expensive record

Yes, you guessed it this time! Copies of the first edition of D.I. Go Pop are currently being sold on Discogs for as much as €598 (about $671).

Mogwai

For many music fans, post rock is synonymous of Mogwai. The Scottish band came in hot with their debut album Young Team (1997, Chemikal Underground). Six years after Slint set the standard for the genre, Mogwai picked up where they left it with this fierce, grandiose debut.

Mogwai Fear Satan, the closing track of the album, might be one of the most exhilarating sonic adventures a music fan can experience. Passing the 16 minutes mark, this song is a hell of a rollercoaster. But don’t stop at their debut. They’ve released plenty of amazing LPs and EPs afterwards, and even recorded soundtracks. Oh, and don’t forget about the beer named after them.

Mogwai’s most expensive record

Mogwai’s most expensive record on Discogs is unsurprisingly Young Team — but not the first edition. The album received the deluxe reissue treatment in 2008 and copies are going for as much as $599.99. Not bad, huh?  

Sigur Rós

In Bahman Gohbadi’s film No One Knows About Persian Cats (2009), two friends plan to create a band and then run away from Iran after being released from prison. The pair befriends a man who takes them through the Tehran underground scene. In one poignant, Ashkan mentions that his biggest dream is to go to Iceland to see Sigur Rós.

This speaks more than I can about the universal appeal of Sigur Rós, a band singing in Icelandic and with the ability to affect listeners worldwide. Just like Mogwai, they’ve been around for more than two decades with unwaning popularity.

Sigur Rós most expensive record

This box set containing three of their best albums and some juicy extras is selling for as much as €550 (about $618).

Swans

Commanded by Michael Gira, Swans has been around over 35 years in one form or another. Their style has always been hard to pigeonhole; some of their releases could be labeled as industrial, others as art rock, and most of them definitely fit within the boundaries of post rock. What remains clear throughout their body of work is how fierce and in-your-face they are. 

Swans’ most expensive record

While we could find a copy of a different release that was selling for a bit more, this limited edition box set of Love Of Life sells for as much as $450 and has higher prices than other records on average.

And So I Watch You From Afar

As I mentioned in the introduction, post rock is a very flexible genre. While some artists within the genre approach it from a minimalistic angle, bands like Neurosis, Deafheaven, and And So I Watch You From Afar are really close or even part of the metal scene.

And So I Watch You From Afar’s most expensive record

The limited edition of their 2009 eponymous record slaps hard, and it can be yours for up to €299.99 (about $337).

Earth

We’re venturing into “dronier” territory. Earth is one of those cult bands well-known int the Discogs community. Their first record, Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version (1992, Sub Pop), set the template for many atmospheric and esoteric rock albums to come. The band is still active nowadays, and they keep releasing amazing albums every few years, so don’t sleep on them!

Earth’s most expensive record

You know the catalog of a band has been properly treated when prices stay generally low. That’s the case with Earth, but we still found this promo cassette for sale for $250.

Explosions In The Sky

This Texas band has been around for 20 years now, and they have become inseparable from the genre. They’ve released some classic post rock albums, such as the earth-shattering The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place (2003, Temporary Residence Limited) and the exhilaratingly beautiful All Of A Sudden I Miss Everyone (2007, Temporary Residence Limited). You can’t go wrong with Explosions In The Sky.

Explosions In The Sky’s most expensive record

If you want to own this edition of their first album, start saving up €799 (about $898).

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

I felt like it would be apropos to wrap up this list with the Canadian collective Godspeed You! Black Emperor The’ve always been the darlings of both critics and fans. Their sheer intensity and cinematic quality are unparalleled, their album covers extremely iconic, and they are surrounded by enough mystery to always keep things interesting.

After lying dormant for almost 10 years, they returned to the stage and the studio in 2012, and delivered the sublime ‘Allelujah! Don’t Bend Ascend (Constellation).

Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s most expensive record

We already told the most expensive GY!BE release in this blog post, but there are only 33 copies of the band’s first cassette, and none has ever been sold on Discogs.

The post 10 Expensive Post Rock Records appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Over 500 leading musicians from across the jazz, folk and electronic scenes have signed an open letter to The Guardian in protest at recently announced cuts to specialist programming on BBC Radio 3. The changes to the schedule were announced in early March and include the “resting” of Jazz Now (which has been on-air just under three years) and Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz, while the genre-hopping Music Planet moves to a midnight slot. But it is the reduction of vital crossover/experimental show Late Junction, from three nightly slots a week to just one, that’s particularly angered many musicians and music fans.

Former Mercury Prize judge/broadcaster Jude Rogers and Luke Turner, founder of online music magazine The Quietus, coordinated the open letter to Radio 3 controller Alan Davey, questioning the decision to drastically reduce the station’s niche music programmes, which goes against the grain of its public services commitments. High-profile musicians who have signed the letter include Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Norma Waterson, Shirley Collins, Tommy Smith OBE, Orphy Robinson MBE, Claire Martin OBE, Cleveland Watkiss MBE, Shabaka Hutchings, Nikki Yeoh, Dennis Rollins, Elliot Galvin and many more.

An online petition has been started to stop the cuts to Late Junction – click here to sign

Mike Flynn

 

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Over 500 leading musicians from across the jazz, folk and electronic scenes have signed an open letter to The Guardian in protest at recently announced cuts to specialist programming on BBC Radio 3. The changes to the schedule were announced in early March and include the “resting” of Jazz Now (which has been on-air just under three years) and Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz, while the genre-hopping Music Planet moves to a midnight slot. But it is the reduction of vital crossover/experimental show Late Junction, from three nightly slots a week to just one, that’s particularly angered many musicians and music fans.

Former Mercury Prize judge/broadcaster Jude Rogers and Luke Turner, founder of online music magazine The Quietus, coordinated the open letter to Radio 3 controller Alan Davey, questioning the decision to drastically reduce the station’s niche music programmes, which goes against the grain of its public services commitments. High-profile musicians who have signed the letter include Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Norma Waterson, Shirley Collins, Tommy Smith OBE, Orphy Robinson MBE, Claire Martin OBE, Cleveland Watkiss MBE, Shabaka Hutchings, Nikki Yeoh, Dennis Rollins, Elliot Galvin and many more.

An online petition has been started to stop the cuts to Late Junction – click here to sign

Mike Flynn

 

from News https://ift.tt/2YdXbyu
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Over 500 leading musicians from across the jazz, folk and electronic scenes have signed an open letter to The Guardian in protest at recently announced cuts to specialist programming on BBC Radio 3. The changes to the schedule were announced in early March and include the “resting” of Jazz Now (which has been on-air just under three years) and Geoffrey Smith’s Jazz, while the genre-hopping Music Planet moves to a midnight slot. But it is the reduction from three nights to one a week of vital crossover/experimental show Late Junction, that’s particularly angered many musicians and music fans.

Former Mercury Prize judge/broadcaster Jude Rogers and Luke Turner, founder of online music magazine The Quietus, coordinated the open letter to Radio 3 controller Alan Davey, questioning the decision to drastically reduce the station’s niche music programmes, which goes against the grain of its public services commitments. High-profile musicians who have signed the letter include Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel, Norma Waterson, Shirley Collins, Tommy Smith OBE, Orphy Robinson MBE, Claire Martin OBE, Cleveland Watkiss MBE, Shabaka Hutchings, Nikki Yeoh, Dennis Rollins, Elliot Galvin and many more.

An online petition has been started to stop the cuts to Late Junction – click here to sign

Mike Flynn

 

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Freya Parr The best recordings of Vaughan Williams’s Pastoral Symphony

Rating: 
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The best recording

 

London Symphony Orchestra/André Previn
RCA 88875126952

André Previn was principal conductor of the LSO for most of the 1970s, and during that period they made many wonderful recordings together. This A Pastoral Symphony was among the best of them, and it continues to set a high bar for other interpretations to aspire to.

The LSO was packed with outstanding section leaders at the time, and the quality of the solo playing eclipses that on any other recording. Violinist John Georgiadis, clarinettist Gervase de Peyer and flautist William Bennett all make telling contributions, as do the oboe and viola soloists, while the important horn and trumpet solos in the second movement are plangently expressive.

Previn’s shaping of the Pastoral has an organic, naturally unravelling quality that is deeply satisfying, and invites repeated listening. The dip and swell of VW’s string writing in the opening movement is sentiently registered, its uneasy dynamic surges unsettling the listener without grandstanding or over-emphasis.

 

 

The third movement has a grungy, glowering demeanour owing much to the LSO’s unshakable corporate virtuosity and Previn’s rhythmic trenchancy. Again, though, Previn deftly avoids overstatement – the physical threat carried in the music is palpable, but there is no unnecessary pummelling. The jittery fugal coda is incisively delivered, and for once seems more than a quizzical afterthought.

Heather Harper is an ideally steady, heartfelt soloist in the finale, her ‘distant’ placing (VW’s stipulation) not so distant that she is audibly in a different acoustic. The inherent sadness of the movement is mitigated by the dignified beauty of the LSO’s playing, shaped by Previn with unfailing sensitivity and insight. Together they find a moving positivity at the symphony’s conclusion, more stirringly articulated than in any other version.

The classic analogue sound is another telling factor in Previn’s favour. No other CD version of the Pastoral holds Vaughan Williams’s subtly intertwining textures so clearly in focus, and there is a tonal richness and plenitude which often seems absent in digital recordings.

Previn’s LSO cycle of the Vaughan Williams symphonies comes and goes in the CD catalogue, regularly finding itself deleted and then repackaged and reissued. It is, however, always available to download or stream. His Pastoral is a classic, the complete cycle an enduring cornerstone of the VW discography.

 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/2LhNnGbQINkuyCtZYI5k9M

 

 

 

Three other great recordings

 

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra/Kees Bakels
Naxos 8.550733

The Dutchman Kees Bakels was principal guest conductor of the Bournemouth Symphony when he made a near-complete cycle of the Vaughan Williams symphonies with the orchestra. Recorded in 1992, his Pastoral is a particularly fine interpretation, one of the most naturally flowing on disc. The recorded sound is a touch misty in tutti sections, but bass lines have a satisfying presence, and Patricia Rozario is a particularly evocative soprano soloist.

 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/44SRvvSqOR3NnuVkJi53S8

 

 

London Philharmonia Orchestra/Roger Norrington
Decca 458 3572

Roger Norrington’s 1997 Pastoral is among the quickest versions you’ll come across, bringing an added edginess to the opening movement in particular. Nowhere, though, is it superficial – both the second and fourth movements are full of expressivity and emotion, and the London Philharmonic’s excellent playing is captured in a resonant, rangy Decca recording. Norrington’s Pastoral is texturally leaner than Previn’s, and filled with flickering monochrome shadings suggesting the ghostly legacy of wartime conflict. Cumulatively it’s a notably moving experience, and as an interpretation has been seriously underrated.

 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/0Tl1LimYcDGph8R3Jre1ma

 

 

Hallé Orchestra/Mark Elder
Hallé CDHLL7540

Vaughan Williams was once a pupil of Ravel, and no version of the Pastoral makes that clearer than Mark Elder’s 2013 recording with the Hallé orchestra. The opening movement in particular has a sensuality reminiscent of Ravel’s ballet Daphnis et Chloé, but it has the necessary dark undercurrent too. The third movement feels slightly rushed and scrambled, but there is no doubting the depth of feeling in both Elder’s interpretation and the Hallé’s playing.

 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/6oh3zPBUxUYXxuKC2IfDKk

 

 

And one to avoid…

Adrian Boult was a great Vaughan Williams conductor, but his 1968 Pastoral with the New Philharmonia Orchestra is not his finest moment. Phrasing is often curiously glib and flat, and at times the deeper emotions of the music seem glided over. Rhythms are also relatively listless, and ensemble can be sloppy. The stereo recording has a greater range than his 1953 mono recording with the London Philharmonic, but that earlier version has a fire and vibrancy that the re-make cannot equal.

 

https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/0XrHBYma2wmmzz3dCxPuhz

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Alex Ross Miscellany

The formidable young composer/instrumentalist Tyshawn Sorey has a heavy schedule at the end of March. On the 28th, he will have a Portrait Concert at Miller Theatre in NYC, with performances by ICE and the JACK Quartet; on the 29th, he will appear at the Kennedy Center’s Direct Current festival; and on the 31st he will be back in NYC for a Zone Music Workshop with Chris Pitsiokos…. By design, no one is certain quite what will happen at the Yoko Ono evening at Disney Hall, part of the LA Phil’s season-long Fluxus series…. Also in LA, the revitalized Monday Evening Concerts presents Chaya Czernowin’s sensuously engulfing quartet-and-electronics piece HIDDEN with the JACK on March 25…. The Site of an Investigation, a new work for voice and orchestra by Jennifer Walshe, can be seen on YouTube, courtesy of New Music Dublin… The Boston-based vocal ensemble Blue Heron has undertaken a multi-season exploration of the complete output of Johannes Ockeghem; there’s much to explore on their website…. On Friday, March 22, the SEM Ensemble reprises their famous performance of Morton Feldman’s For Philip Guston at their Willow Place headquarters in Brooklyn. I wrote about SEM’s 1995 traversal for the New York Times…. On April 5, Marianne Schroeder, one of the greatest exponents of the brutally otherworldly music of Galina Ustvolskaya, will play the six sonatas at St. Peter’s in NYC, as part of the Blank Forms series.

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