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Date

April 9, 2019

Hear Anna Homler in collaboration

via The Wire: Home http://bit.ly/2WYGgii

Gallery: Anne Bean: Self Etc

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Freya Parr A guide to Vaughan Williams’s Symphony No. 4

Rating: 
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After the pastoral serenity of the previous decade’s work, the rage and violence in parts of the Fourth comes as a surprise to many. 

One of the most striking features of Vaughan Williams’s life-work story is his seemingly limitless capacity for creative renewal. Just when everybody thought they had him safely pigeonholed, he would unleash another lightning-bolt from the blue.

 

Reception

When the Fourth Symphony appeared, in 1934, it made broadsheet headlines. Had the composer of the Tallis Fantasia and The Lark Ascending suddenly become a modernist – in his sixties? Where had all this rage, violence and sullen brooding come from – these garish, acerbic colours and vicious dissonances?

This reaction shows, however, that a lot of people hadn’t been paying very close attention to what the composer had been doing of late. Way back in the 1920s, in such seemingly Arcadian works as A Pastoral Symphony and Flos Campi, he had experimented with non-tonal harmonies, with new ways of creating and employing dissonance.

 

 

Then in the Blake-inspired ballet – or, rather, ‘Masque for Dancing’ – Job (1927-30), the portrayal of evil, suffering and alienation had elicited all sorts of new devices: complex, free-floating polyphony; bitter parody (unctuous saxophone, sneering ‘blasphemous’ chant parodies on brass); ‘demonic’ obsessive repeated rhythms, grotesquely scored.

From this it was a short step to the gritty, ultimately enigmatic Piano Concerto (1931), which so impressed the arch-modernist Béla Bartók. And, by another step, to the Fourth Symphony, in which it sometimes sounds as though Blake’s Satan has won after all, and that it is the putative Christian Quietism of the earlier Mass in G minor that has finally been flung out of Heaven.

 


BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra perform Vaughan Williams's Symphony No. 4 under Andrew Manze at the 2012 BBC Proms

 

Influences

Vaughan Williams was not a composer who was interested in innovation for its own sake. If he strove for the new, it was because he had something new to say, which required new means with which to say it. The fact that Vaughan Williams’s musical language became noticeably more turbulent and hard-edged as Europe entered the 1930s struck some listeners fairly quickly. The appearance of the anti-war cantata Dona nobis pacem (‘Grant us peace’) in 1936 was surely ample confirmation.

Deep in his prophetic soul, Vaughan Williams had sensed what was coming, and was making no secret of it. Was it warning, protest, or an explosion of fury and despair from one who had hoped that humanity might have learned its lesson from the ‘War to End All Wars’ – whose horrors he had experienced at first hand?

 

 

But there may have been other influences. One friend thought she heard in the Fourth Symphony a direct expression of Vaughan Williams’s terrible temper – the composer didn’t argue. There were reasons why that volcano might have been building up.

Vaughan Williams was devoted to his wife, Adeline, but there were huge strains in the relationship: Adeline was more or less crippled with arthritis for much of it, and her husband was scrupulously attentive. Emotional and sexual frustration, coupled with what some psychologists call ‘carer’s rage’, may also have found a safety valve in these big 1930s works. Whatever the case, there were soon to be immense changes.

 

 

Premiere

Composed: 1931-4
Premiere: 10 April 1935, Queen’s Hall, London, BBC Symphony Orchestra/Adrian Boult

The new mood of the Fourth took many people by surprise. Apparently, it was a newspaper review of a new work by a European modernist that set Vaughan Williams’s imagination firing. Thus he experimented with complex rhythmic counterpoint, non-tonal harmonies and intricate working-out of two four-note motifs that at times comes close to serialism.

Yes, there is a great deal of violent, desolate and sarcastic music in this symphony, but what makes it really remarkable is how alive the music sounds. It’s as though a magnificent predatory beast, long kept caged or leashed, has at least been allowed its freedom.

 

Recommended recording

BBC Symphony Orchestra/Vaughan Williams
Dutton CDAX8011 

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Dave Thompson Vinyl Reviews: The Zombies, Gary Numan, Massive Attack, Jewel

From The Zombies’ ‘Complete Studio Recordings’ to Gary Numan’s vinyl reissue of ‘I, Assassin,’ Spin Cycle is packed this month.

The post Vinyl Reviews: The Zombies, Gary Numan, Massive Attack, Jewel appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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NeahkahnieGold Record Store Day Releases Worth A Fortune

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Love it or leave it, Record Store Day has undoubtedly become a cultural phenomenon. Hardcore collectors and casual enthusiasts alike get an opportunity to dig for hard to come by and potentially lucrative limited-edition records. Though many releases are ‘limited’, they are often printed in the thousands of copies, which tends to inhibit large increases in value. However, there are a few rare Record Store Day releases that have increased astronomically in price and are now worth a small fortune. Some are due to being secret small-batch Easter eggs, many due to high demand, others almost unexplainably so.

Granted, some of you might not agree with my classification of a fortune, but the last time this collector dropped more than $200 on a release was never, and not from lack of wanting. Also, side note on my methodology; it was haphazard and I may have missed some expensive Record Store Day releases – feel free to help me out in the comments. However, I did take the liberty of excluding Black Friday Record Store Day releases and Record Store Day test pressings. Guess that makes me somewhat of a purist.

With all that being said, let’s take a peek at some of the most expensive Record Store Day releases, as measured by their median sale value on the Discogs Marketplace. Many of these high-priced Record Store Day releases are currently on sale for much more than the median on the Discogs Marketplace, indicating that they can and will continue to go up in value. For those that have yet to be sold on Discogs, I have listed the lowest current for sale price in the Discogs Marketplace.

Boards Of Canada ‎– ------ / ------ / ------ / XXXXXX / ------ / ------

Boards Of Canada ‎– —— / —— / —— / XXXXXX / —— / ——

Median Sale Price: $2,500.00
RSD 2013
Notes: A rare promotional record with only 4 copies claimed of 6 known to be in existence. These were secretly placed in the racks of Other Music (RIP) in NYC and other stores on Record Store Day 2013.

PM ‎– Sweet Thrash album cover

PM* ‎– Sweet Thrash

Median Sale Price: $938.60
RSD 2015
Notes: Paul McCartney self-released and signed this secret easter egg. The first wave of records appeared in select shops in the UK on April 6-7, 2015. A handful of shops in the US received a single copy and were instructed to not advertise it or include it with the rest of the RSD releases, but to hide it under the Paul McCartney section on Record Store Day. Each side contains a different unreleased alternate mix of “Hope For The Future”. Limited to 100 copies worldwide.

Cake ‎– Vinyl Box Set

Cake ‎– Vinyl Box Set

Median Sale Price: $631.38
RSD 2014
Notes: This impressive collection of 8 records was slated for release during RSD 2013, then delayed to RSD 2014. The Cake Vinyl Box Set was released in a limited batch of 900 copies, with additional copies made available the following week via the Cake web store. This is the highest-priced box set in the list, but as a rule of thumb, box sets tend to retain or gain value more reliably than single releases.

David Bowie ‎– Starman

David Bowie ‎– Starman

Median Sale Price: $380.91
RSD 2012
Notes: Heads up – this isn’t the last David Bowie picture disc you’re going to see on this list. The RSD 2012 release of David Bowie’s Starman was limited to 2,000 copies worldwide.

(The) Melvins* ‎– (A) Senile Animal

(The) Melvins* ‎– (A) Senile Animal

Median Sale Price: $350.00
RSD 2010
Notes: The very rare orange version of this original box set was limited to 35 copies. Sold in store and online by Vacation Vinyl in Los Angeles, CA (edit: they are not closed as I previously stated, just moved spaces. Thanks for the tip WalterYetman). Each box is hand numbered, -1 to -35, contains a belt buckle and ‘Your Disease Spread Quick’ comic book signed, numbered and doodled by Tom Neely.

Captain Murphy ‎– Duality

Captain Murphy ‎– Duality

Median Sale Price: $309.29
RSD 2013
Notes: This one is a stretch, as it was primarily distributed via an online flash sale, but they did release 100 into the wild on Record Store Day 2013 so it’s squeaking on to this list. Duality a killer album by Flying Lotus’s moniker Captain Murphy that is unlikely to ever be officially released again due to the amount of controversial, hard to credit, samples on the album. There are allegedly 1,000 copies of the Duality vinyl worldwide.

LCD Soundsystem ‎– The Long Goodbye: LCD Soundsystem Live At Madison Square Garden

LCD Soundsystem ‎– The Long Goodbye: LCD Soundsystem Live At Madison Square Garden

Median Sale Price: $237.50
RSD 2014
Notes: Remember when LCD Soundsystem claimed they were retiring? Yeah, us too. Murphy left us with this recording of his ‘final’ concert at Madison Square Garden. 3+ hours of pure LCD Soundsytem gold, mixed by the man himself, limited to just 3,000 copies.

David Bowie ‎– 1984

David Bowie ‎– 1984

Median Sale Price: $236.62
RSD 2014
Notes: Heed my words – people love David Bowie picture discs. This causes them to skyrocket in value, according to that one economics class I took. Something about high demand and a limited supply of 4,000 copies causes this Record Store Day release to be worth more than $200 on the Discogs Marketplace.

Jack White ‎– Sixteen Saltines

Jack White ‎– Sixteen Saltines

Median Sale Price: $230.00
RSD 2012
Notes: Sold exclusively at Third Man Records store and Rolling Record store on Record Store Day 2012.

Red Hot Chili Peppers ‎– Stadium Arcadium

Red Hot Chili Peppers ‎– Stadium Arcadium

Median Sale Price: $200.00
RSD 2012
Notes: Record Store Day 2012 Reissue limited to 2,000 copies of the 2006 Red Hot Chili Peppers album, Stadium Arcadium. Interestingly enough, these are supposedly leftover copies of the original run, which, if true, is an ingenious marketing ploy that definitely worked.

This is not an exhaustive list by any means and we may have missed a few valuable Record Sale Day releases. If you have any to add, feel free to drop them in the comments. Grazi and happy hunting during Record Store Day 2019!

Interested in joining the passionate community of music lovers at Discogs? Sign up for an account to track your Collection, start a Wantlist and shop for thousands of music releases in the Discogs Marketplace!

The post Record Store Day Releases Worth A Fortune appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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“When I showed Lou the contact sheets, he zeroed in on the transformer shot. I made the print…

via The Real Mick Rock http://bit.ly/2D5nOwV

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Don Was 4 web optimised 1000 CREDIT Gabi Porter

Don Was, the President of the iconic Blue Note Records, has been announced as the recipient of the PPL Lifetime Achievement Award at this year’s Jazz FM Awards. Set to take place on 30 April at Shoreditch Town Hall, the ceremony will honour a wide range of artists from the UK and US jazz scenes. Was, besides being a renowned record producer, has been credited with reviving Blue Note since being appointed its CEO in 2012, with successful signings including Gregory Porter, GoGo Penguin and Trombone Shorty. He’s also overseeing the label’s 80th anniversary this year, with celebrations including an extensive vinyl release programme and Swiss film-maker Sophie Huber’s cinematic tribute to the label’s legacy, with her film Beyond the Notes getting a cinematic release.

Commenting on the Lifetime Acievement Award, Don Was said: “I’m incredibly grateful to Jazz FM for recognizing me and Blue Note Records with its Lifetime Achievement Award. Jazz is what inspired me to become a musician many years ago, and it is incredibly rewarding and humbling to serve as the caretaker for this historic and hugely important label. It’s a responsibility I welcome and one that I take very seriously. This honour is especially meaningful coming from Jazz FM, who not only keeps the jazz legacy alive but carries the torch forward by recognizing and supporting the great jazz that is being created today .”

The award’s organisers have also confirmed that acclaimed British singer Beverley Knight will perform a tribute to iconic soul vocalist Aretha Franklin, who died in 2018. The awards will be hosted by Jazz FM presenters Chris Philips and Jez Nelson with the recipients of the PRS for Music Gold Award and Impact Award to be announced ahead of the ceremony.  

Nominees include jazz giants Wayne Shorter, Charles Lloyd and the late great John Coltrane (for his posthumously released best-selling Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album) alongside many names from the resurgent British jazz scene, including Sons of Kemet, Nubya GarciaEmma Jean-Thackray, Camilla George, Joe Armon-JonesMoses Boyd and Sarah Tandy, while live events such as Jazz Re:fest (Brighton edition) and The Cookers at Church of Sound, are also recognised.

For more details visit www.jazzfmawards.com 

The full list of nominees is as follows:

Breakthrough Act
 
Cassie Kinoshi
Emma-Jean Thackary
Sarah Tandy
 
The Digital Award with Oanda
 
Blue Lab Beats
Louis Cole
Moses Boyd – 1Xtra Residency
 
The Innovation Award with Mishcon de Reya
 
Orphy Robinson – Freedom Sessions at Vortex
Steam Down
Tomorrow’s Warriors
 
Instrumentalist of the Year
 
Camilla George
Jean Toussaint
Rob Luft
 
International Jazz Act of the Year with Lateralize
 
Jamie Branch
Makaya McCraven
Wayne Shorter
 
Soul Act of the Year
 
José James
Leon Bridges
Poppy Ajudha
 
Blues Act of the Year
 
Eric Bibb
Errol Linton
Roosevelt Collier
 
Vocalist of the Year
 
Cherise Adams-Burnett
Ian Shaw
Judi Jackson
 
UK Jazz Act of the Year (Public Vote) with Cambridge Audio
 
Jason Yarde
Joe Armon-Jones
Nubya Garcia
    
Album of the Year (Public Vote) with Arqiva
  
Charles Lloyd & The Marvels and Lucinda Williams – Vanished Gardens
Jean Toussaint Allstar 6Tet – Brother Raymond
John Coltrane – Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album
Sons of Kemet – Your Queen Is A Reptile
Various Artists – We Out Here
Wayne Shorter – Emanon
 
Live Experience of the Year (Public Vote)
 
Jason Moran: The Harlem Hellfighters – Tour
Jazz Re:Fest 2018: Brighton Edition
Makaya McCraven and Nubya Garcia – EFG London Jazz Festival
Orphy Robinson presents Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks – Tour
Steam Down featuring Kamasi Washington
The Cookers – Church of Sound

 – Mike Flynn

Photo by Gabi Porter

from News http://bit.ly/2Gb0iR6
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Don Was 4 web optimised 1000 CREDIT Gabi Porter

Don Was, the President of the iconic Blue Note Records, has been announced as the recipient of the PPL Lifetime Achievement Award at this year’s Jazz FM Awards. Set to take place on 30 April at Shoreditch Town Hall, the ceremony will honour a wide range of artists from the UK and US jazz scenes. Was, besides being a renowned record producer, has been credited with reviving Blue Note since being appointed its CEO in 2012, with successful signings including Gregory Porter, GoGo Penguin and Trombone Shorty. He’s also overseeing the label’s 80th anniversary this year, with celebrations including an extensive vinyl release programme and Swiss film-maker Sophie Huber’s cinematic tribute to the label’s legacy, with her film Beyond the Notes getting a cinematic release.

Commenting on the Lifetime Acievement Award, Don Was said: “I’m incredibly grateful to Jazz FM for recognizing me and Blue Note Records with its Lifetime Achievement Award. Jazz is what inspired me to become a musician many years ago, and it is incredibly rewarding and humbling to serve as the caretaker for this historic and hugely important label. It’s a responsibility I welcome and one that I take very seriously. This honour is especially meaningful coming from Jazz FM, who not only keeps the jazz legacy alive but carries the torch forward by recognizing and supporting the great jazz that is being created today .”

The award’s organisers have also confirmed that acclaimed British singer Beverley Knight will perform a tribute to iconic soul vocalist Aretha Franklin, who died in 2018. The awards will be hosted by Jazz FM presenters Chris Philips and Jez Nelson with the recipients of the PRS for Music Gold Award and Impact Award to be announced ahead of the ceremony.  

Nominees include jazz giants Wayne Shorter, Charles Lloyd and the late great John Coltrane (for his posthumously released best-selling Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album) alongside many names from the resurgent British jazz scene, including Sons of Kemet, Nubya GarciaEmma Jean-Thackray, Camilla George, Joe Armon-JonesMoses Boyd and Sarah Tandy, while live events such as Jazz Re:fest (Brighton edition) and The Cookers at Church of Sound, are also recognised.

For more details visit www.jazzfmawards.com 

The full list of nominees is as follows:

Breakthrough Act
 
Cassie Kinoshi
Emma-Jean Thackary
Sarah Tandy
 
The Digital Award with Oanda
 
Blue Lab Beats
Louis Cole
Moses Boyd – 1Xtra Residency
 
The Innovation Award with Mishcon de Reya
 
Orphy Robinson – Freedom Sessions at Vortex
Steam Down
Tomorrow’s Warriors
 
Instrumentalist of the Year
 
Camilla George
Jean Toussaint
Rob Luft
 
International Jazz Act of the Year with Lateralize
 
Jamie Branch
Makaya McCraven
Wayne Shorter
 
Soul Act of the Year
 
José James
Leon Bridges
Poppy Ajudha
 
Blues Act of the Year
 
Eric Bibb
Errol Linton
Roosevelt Collier
 
Vocalist of the Year
 
Cherise Adams-Burnett
Ian Shaw
Judi Jackson
 
UK Jazz Act of the Year (Public Vote) with Cambridge Audio
 
Jason Yarde
Joe Armon-Jones
Nubya Garcia
    
Album of the Year (Public Vote) with Arqiva
  
Charles Lloyd & The Marvels and Lucinda Williams – Vanished Gardens
Jean Toussaint Allstar 6Tet – Brother Raymond
John Coltrane – Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album
Sons of Kemet – Your Queen Is A Reptile
Various Artists – We Out Here
Wayne Shorter – Emanon
 
Live Experience of the Year (Public Vote)
 
Jason Moran: The Harlem Hellfighters – Tour
Jazz Re:Fest 2018: Brighton Edition
Makaya McCraven and Nubya Garcia – EFG London Jazz Festival
Orphy Robinson presents Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks – Tour
Steam Down featuring Kamasi Washington
The Cookers – Church of Sound

 – Mike Flynn

Photo by Gabi Porter

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jfl On ClassicsToday: Rachel Podger’s New Bach Recording

Rachel Podger Plays Bach’s—Wait For It—Cello Suites!

by Jens F. Laurson

When Rachel Podger recorded the Bach Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin—for the second time—in 2001, it was a subtle-yet-radiant effort; certainly one of the finest and most endearing recordings of these works and perhaps one of the first to meaningfully transcend the Historically Informed… Continue Reading

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