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Date

April 25, 2019

Jeffrey Lee Puckett The Most Epic Marvel Music Moments

Fanboys and girls worldwide are losing their minds as Avengers: Endgame arrives in theaters, wrapping up the most ambitious, sprawling, and successful storyline in movie history. That bastard Thanos has got to go down, even though some of his ideas, frankly, aren’t half bad.

Over the course of the 22 movies that comprise the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there has consistently been expert, and even thrilling, use of familiar music.

The Guardians of the Galaxy: Awesome Mix Vol. 1 reached No. 1 on the Billboard charts for a reason, namely because it’s awesome, but that awesomeness has everything to do with how director James Gunn used those songs in the movie.

To celebrate Endgame, here’s a list of epic moments where Marvel met music, and everyone left happy. It probably doesn’t have your favorite moment because no list is perfect, but Discogs has given me the Internet version of the Infinity Gauntlet: absolute listicle power.

So like Loki said in the first Avengers movie, “Kneel before me. I said, ‘KNEEEEEEEEEEEEELLLLLL!!!!’”

Thor: Ragnarok

1. God Of Thunder

The MCU is filled with dozens of great scenes, but one of the most glorious is Thor’s comeback victory against Hela, his sister — and, oh yeah, goddess of death.

2017’s Thor: Ragnarok is one of the MCU’s finest movies, in part because it offers such a complete version of Thor, a god who is equal parts hero and beach bro. As Hela is absolutely punishing Thor, who’s already down to one eye and without his hammer, he summons his power over lightning and … cue Immigrant Song.

This is the equivalent of movies and music making babies together with fierce, sweaty intent. People came out of their damn seats in the theater as Led Zeppelin’s paean to the Norse gods roared, and a slow-motion Thor rode sheets of lightning into battle.

There are a lot of versions of Zeppelin III, but anyone serious about both sound quality and collectibility should go for an original UK press or the Canadian red label, which has a lot of fans.

Guardians Of The Galaxy In Infinity War

2. Meet The Guardians

Here’s the thing a lot of people don’t understand: The Spinners’ The Rubberband Man is one of history’s greatest songs. Everything about it is perfection, from singer Philippé Wynne’s typically incredible vocal to how the gleeful bass line sounds as if it were played on an actual giant rubber band.

Also, who is this Rubberband Man? How did he learn to inspire true happiness by using his toes — and nose! — to play music on rubber bands? He’s truly a hero for our times and just the kind of guy that Peter Quill would actually believe is a real hero. After all, he thinks Footloose is history’s best movie.

That’s why it was the ideal song to use as the Guardians of the Galaxy were introduced in 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War. The Guardians have the MCU’s most clearly fleshed-out characters, and this brief scene is not only fun but shows how much Gamora has embraced Quill’s throwback worldview.

Guardians Of The Galaxy

3. A Truly Awesome Mix

Guardians of the Galaxy was a turning point in the MCU, proving that a Marvel movie could be genuinely funny, which is different from just having a few good jokes. It was the first soundtrack featuring previously-released songs to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Top 200, and we can thank Redbone for that.

The opening credit sequence, with Quill/Star-Lord stealing what turns out to be an Infinity Stone, establishes the tone of the movie and Quill’s personality, all to the tune of Come and Get Your Love. I would argue that this isn’t Gunn’s best song choice — we’ll get to that in a second — but maybe his most important.

The soundtrack is well worth having for anyone who doesn’t already have a decent stash of 1970s music.

Iron Man

4. Stark Contrast

AC/DC is the MCU’s most prominent rocker, and Back In Black was the first sound heard as the MCU arrived in all its glory with 2008’s Iron Man, blasting over the film’s opening scene and establishing Tony Stark’s screw-it-all attitude.

But that can’t touch the scene in 2012’s The Avengers when Iron Man arrives to confront Loki, in the process overriding the Quinjet’s PA to crank Shoot to Thrill as he drills Loki with repulsor rays. This is apparently Tony’s favorite AC/DC song as he also used it to announce his entrance in 2010’s Iron Man 2.

The soundtrack of songs from The Avengers is eminently forgettable but Shoot to Thrill is included on the Iron Man 2 all AC/DC soundtrack, which serves as a nice best-of and is the only MCU soundtrack dedicated to a single band.

Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2

5. More Awesomeness

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 isn’t as good as the first, but that opening fight scene sure was promising. As the rest of the Guardians battle an enormous space creature, tiny Groot is preoccupied with getting his jamz on and chooses Electric Light Orchestra’s Mr. Blue Sky, a song that only gets better with time.

The juxtaposition of tiny Groot’s awkward dancing to a Jeff Lynne classic against the insane violence happening all around him is the Guardians in a nutshell. There are a ton of good songs on the soundtrack, which is still affordable.

The Defenders

6. Small Screen Themes

Television theme songs about crimefighters will never get any better than Henry Mancini’s theme for Peter Gunn, a hyper-cool slice of detective noir that has been obsessively covered by everyone from Jimi Hendrix to The Art of Noise.

But composers working with characters from Marvel’s supergroup of loners, The Defenders, have delivered some quality themes — and sparked a growing collectible market for the 7″ singles released by Marvel and Netflix.

Sean Callery’s Jessica Jones Main Title, Trevor Morris’ Iron Fist Main Titles, John Paesano’s Main Title from Daredevil, and Luke Cage’s double shot of Method Man’s Bulletproof Love and Faith Evans’ Mesmerized all capture the flavor of their respective heroes. But Callery’s dark, slinky instrumental is especially good.

Spider-Man cartoon

7. Animated Antics

The Ramones’ Blitzkrieg Bop makes an effective appearance in 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming, reuniting one of New York’s most iconic bands with its old stomping grounds. It works. It really does!

But is it better than The Ramones’ cover of the 1960s Spidey cartoon theme, even though that has nothing to do with MCU canon? No. No, it isn’t.

This was a marriage made in heaven, and maybe one day it’ll find its way into the MCU. For now though, you can only find it on Saturday Morning Cartoons’ Greatest Hits, an MCA compilation loaded with artists such as Matthew Sweet, Helmet, and Butthole Surfers. The vinyl is getting pricey, so maybe it’s worth grabbing before a CGI Joey actually does show up in a Spider-Man movie.

Ghost Rider

8. Suicidal Fandom

And finally, a song that is completely unrelated to MCU canon but absolutely cuts to the heart of what it means to be a fan.

In 1977, a Jersey band called Suicide released its self-titled debut album, a starkly riveting piece of electronic art punk. The music of Alan Vega and Martin Rev now sounds both primal and prescient. They led off their introduction to the world with Ghost Rider, a song about Marvel’s Johnny Blaze.

The song is insane — almost as insane as the Nic Cage Ghost Rider movies — and any fan of terrifying proto-punk minimalism needs this record, because the entire album is nuts. But unless you’re blessed with deep pockets, you’re stuck with a reissue because a first pressing starts at $100.

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
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Jeffrey Lee Puckett The Most Epic Marvel Music Moments

Fanboys and girls worldwide are losing their minds as Avengers: Endgame arrives in theaters, wrapping up the most ambitious, sprawling, and successful storyline in movie history. That bastard Thanos has got to go down, even though some of his ideas, frankly, aren’t half bad.

Over the course of the 22 movies that comprise the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there has consistently been expert, and even thrilling, use of familiar music.

The Guardians of the Galaxy: Awesome Mix Vol. 1 reached No. 1 on the Billboard charts for a reason, namely because it’s awesome, but that awesomeness has everything to do with how director James Gunn used those songs in the movie.

To celebrate Endgame, here’s a list of epic moments where Marvel met music, and everyone left happy. It probably doesn’t have your favorite moment because no list is perfect, but Discogs has given me the Internet version of the Infinity Gauntlet: absolute listicle power.

So like Loki said in the first Avengers movie, “Kneel before me. I said, ‘KNEEEEEEEEEEEEELLLLLL!!!!’”

Thor: Ragnarok

1. God Of Thunder

The MCU is filled with dozens of great scenes, but one of the most glorious is Thor’s comeback victory against Hela, his sister — and, oh yeah, goddess of death.

2017’s Thor: Ragnarok is one of the MCU’s finest movies, in part because it offers such a complete version of Thor, a god who is equal parts hero and beach bro. As Hela is absolutely punishing Thor, who’s already down to one eye and without his hammer, he summons his power over lightning and … cue Immigrant Song.

This is the equivalent of movies and music making babies together with fierce, sweaty intent. People came out of their damn seats in the theater as Led Zeppelin’s paean to the Norse gods roared, and a slow-motion Thor rode sheets of lightning into battle.

There are a lot of versions of Zeppelin III, but anyone serious about both sound quality and collectibility should go for an original UK press or the Canadian red label, which has a lot of fans.

Guardians Of The Galaxy In Infinity War

2. Meet The Guardians

Here’s the thing a lot of people don’t understand: The Spinners’ The Rubberband Man is one of history’s greatest songs. Everything about it is perfection, from singer Philippé Wynne’s typically incredible vocal to how the gleeful bass line sounds as if it were played on an actual giant rubber band.

Also, who is this Rubberband Man? How did he learn to inspire true happiness by using his toes — and nose! — to play music on rubber bands? He’s truly a hero for our times and just the kind of guy that Peter Quill would actually believe is a real hero. After all, he thinks Footloose is history’s best movie.

That’s why it was the ideal song to use as the Guardians of the Galaxy were introduced in 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War. The Guardians have the MCU’s most clearly fleshed-out characters, and this brief scene is not only fun but shows how much Gamora has embraced Quill’s throwback worldview.

Guardians Of The Galaxy

3. A Truly Awesome Mix

Guardians of the Galaxy was a turning point in the MCU, proving that a Marvel movie could be genuinely funny, which is different from just having a few good jokes. It was the first soundtrack featuring previously-released songs to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Top 200, and we can thank Redbone for that.

The opening credit sequence, with Quill/Star-Lord stealing what turns out to be an Infinity Stone, establishes the tone of the movie and Quill’s personality, all to the tune of Come and Get Your Love. I would argue that this isn’t Gunn’s best song choice — we’ll get to that in a second — but maybe his most important.

The soundtrack is well worth having for anyone who doesn’t already have a decent stash of 1970s music.

Iron Man

4. Stark Contrast

AC/DC is the MCU’s most prominent rocker, and Back In Black was the first sound heard as the MCU arrived in all its glory with 2008’s Iron Man, blasting over the film’s opening scene and establishing Tony Stark’s screw-it-all attitude.

But that can’t touch the scene in 2012’s The Avengers when Iron Man arrives to confront Loki, in the process overriding the Quinjet’s PA to crank Shoot to Thrill as he drills Loki with repulsor rays. This is apparently Tony’s favorite AC/DC song as he also used it to announce his entrance in 2010’s Iron Man 2.

The soundtrack of songs from The Avengers is eminently forgettable but Shoot to Thrill is included on the Iron Man 2 all AC/DC soundtrack, which serves as a nice best-of and is the only MCU soundtrack dedicated to a single band.

Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2

5. More Awesomeness

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 isn’t as good as the first, but that opening fight scene sure was promising. As the rest of the Guardians battle an enormous space creature, tiny Groot is preoccupied with getting his jamz on and chooses Electric Light Orchestra’s Mr. Blue Sky, a song that only gets better with time.

The juxtaposition of tiny Groot’s awkward dancing to a Jeff Lynne classic against the insane violence happening all around him is the Guardians in a nutshell. There are a ton of good songs on the soundtrack, which is still affordable.

The Defenders

6. Small Screen Themes

Television theme songs about crimefighters will never get any better than Henry Mancini’s theme for Peter Gunn, a hyper-cool slice of detective noir that has been obsessively covered by everyone from Jimi Hendrix to The Art of Noise.

But composers working with characters from Marvel’s supergroup of loners, The Defenders, have delivered some quality themes — and sparked a growing collectible market for the 7″ singles released by Marvel and Netflix.

Sean Callery’s Jessica Jones Main Title, Trevor Morris’ Iron Fist Main Titles, John Paesano’s Main Title from Daredevil, and Luke Cage’s double shot of Method Man’s Bulletproof Love and Faith Evans’ Mesmerized all capture the flavor of their respective heroes. But Callery’s dark, slinky instrumental is especially good.

Spider-Man cartoon

7. Animated Antics

The Ramones’ Blitzkrieg Bop makes an effective appearance in 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming, reuniting one of New York’s most iconic bands with its old stomping grounds. It works. It really does!

But is it better than The Ramones’ cover of the 1960s Spidey cartoon theme, even though that has nothing to do with MCU canon? No. No, it isn’t.

This was a marriage made in heaven, and maybe one day it’ll find its way into the MCU. For now though, you can only find it on Saturday Morning Cartoons’ Greatest Hits, an MCA compilation loaded with artists such as Matthew Sweet, Helmet, and Butthole Surfers. The vinyl is getting pricey, so maybe it’s worth grabbing before a CGI Joey actually does show up in a Spider-Man movie.

Ghost Rider

8. Suicidal Fandom

And finally, a song that is completely unrelated to MCU canon but absolutely cuts to the heart of what it means to be a fan.

In 1977, a Jersey band called Suicide released its self-titled debut album, a starkly riveting piece of electronic art punk. The music of Alan Vega and Martin Rev now sounds both primal and prescient. They led off their introduction to the world with Ghost Rider, a song about Marvel’s Johnny Blaze.

The song is insane — almost as insane as the Nic Cage Ghost Rider movies — and any fan of terrifying proto-punk minimalism needs this record, because the entire album is nuts. But unless you’re blessed with deep pockets, you’re stuck with a reissue because a first pressing starts at $100.

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
Don’t miss a beat!
Subscribe to Discogs Newsletters for music news, contests, exclusive vinyl & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account here.
––––

The post The Most Epic Marvel Music Moments appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Afghan Stars light up the BBC

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Sean Cannon Inside Vinyl Me, Please’s Exclusive Jazzhead Club

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Over the last year, Vinyl Me, Please has ratcheted up its game for rabid record collectors. Whether it’s the ever-increasing number of exclusive variants, the addition of their Classics subscription track, or introducing the world to mostly-unheard gems, they’re flexing these days.

That said, it all pales in comparison to their latest large project: a seven-LP box set limited to 1,000 copies, celebrating the 80th anniversary of Blue Note Records. Curated by label president and famed producer Don Was, the box itself would be a big enough deal. Blue Note is one of the premier jazz labels, and Was hand picked some lesser-known classics to give a full accounting and appreciation of its history.

“Every one of these records kinda shows artists in transition, moving to something different than what they did the album before,” Was said. “And in retrospect you can see where it aims into where they were going next. But they are all snapshots, beautiful snapshots, of a significant moment of pushing the envelope and that’s what ties them all together.”

But simply showing off these snapshots wasn’t enough for VMP and Blue Note. They wanted to create an immersive experience that hearkened back to the “good old days” of what you might call musical communalism — while also using technology to foster camaraderie.

That starts with the box itself. Instead of announcing all the titles and shipping everything at once, the announcements are staggered, and the set arrives in three bi-weekly installments that explore different eras of jazz. The physical release is then accompanied by exclusive digital materials and a four-part podcast, which features Was discussing Blue Note’s catalog and its significance from both a historical and personal perspective.

“When he was a kid, he used to talk about driving across town literally just to hold a Blue Note record in his hands,” VMP’s head of music Cameron Schaefer told Billboard. “He didn’t have [money] to buy them… And it was actually incredibly inspiring for everyone that was sitting there. He really gave one of the best treatises on why someone should listen to jazz that I’ve ever heard. So I think that was cool for us as well.”

On top of all that, VMP created a closed Facebook group for the 1,000 lucky fans who purchased the box. The group isn’t just for promoting the box set or label, either. With hundreds of posts and comments since its creation three weeks ago, the group has become a digital watering hole for heads to show off their collections, introduce one another to unheralded bangers, and deepen their knowledge of the genre through discussion.

Vinyl Me Please Blue Note Anthology

“I’ve discovered some great albums and learned so damn much,” said a group member who wished to remain nameless. “Being able to meet people who are open to learning as much as they are educating has been huge for me. I can’t wait to see how much fun it is once all the records get here.”

While none of these pieces on their own are revolutionary — serialized box sets aren’t new, music podcasts are common, and Facebook groups are myriad — combining them to build a shared world for a small number of dedicated fans is something altogether unique. Fans clearly agreed, as sales exceeded wildest expectations.

“While we were cautiously optimistic that vinyl collectors would see the value in this type of product,” said VMP’s marketing director Matt Hessler, before admitting, “we were overwhelmed by the response and sold out of all 1,000 units in under three hours.”

The success both with sales and a community that is sui generis, Vinyl Me, Please has established a blueprint that might help move record collecting forward in its own small way amidst cultural entropy. “This first VMP Anthology release has proven that in a world increasingly moving towards streaming, there are still fans who will gladly invest in music and this industry on a deeper level,” Hessler said. “We are excited to honor that by curating more exciting VMP Anthology releases in the near future.”

The post Inside Vinyl Me, Please’s Exclusive Jazzhead Club appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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New 2018 Annual Report reveals Help Musicians UK is providing more support than ever before

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“Lou Reed was a true master of his art and one of the most…

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Goldmine1 David Bowie ‘The Mercury Demos’ available June 28

As part of the ongoing celebrations marking 50 years since David Bowie’s first hit, “Space Oddity,” and following the recent Spying Through A Keyhole and Clareville Grove Demoscollections, Parlophone is releasing a further set of recordings known as THE ‘MERCURY’ DEMOS.

The post David Bowie ‘The Mercury Demos’ available June 28 appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Goldmine1 The Prince Estate to release 15-track album, ‘Originals’

This June, The Prince Estate, in partnership with Warner Bros. Records and TIDAL, will release ‘Originals,’ a 15-track album featuring 14 previously unreleased recordings that illuminate the vital, behind-the-scenes role Prince played in other artists’ careers.

The post The Prince Estate to release 15-track album, ‘Originals’ appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

RibotWeb

Portugal’s premier experimental jazz bash, Jazz em Agosto, adopts a decidedly rebellious stance this year with a series of events pushing for protest and a manifesto of social change. Held between 1-11 August, within the grounds of Lisbon’s picturesque Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, among the sonic insurgents appearing at this year’s festival are Marc Ribot, who’ll be performing his ‘Songs of Resistance’ suite, plus Nicole Mitchell, Joey Baron, Tomas Fujiwara, Zeena Parkins, Ambrose Akinmusire, Ingrid Laubrock, Tom Rainey, Julien Desprez and Mary Halvorson.

Spencer Grady

For more details and ticket info visit www.gulbenkian.pt/jazzemagosto/en

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