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Date

May 3, 2019

Discogs Staff Ten Artists To Listen To On Cinco De Mayo

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Cinco de Mayo is a remembrance of the Mexican army’s victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. It’s only a minor holiday in Mexico, with banks and federal offices remaining open. However, in the United States, the holiday is widely regarded as an opportunity to shine a light on the rich culture of Mexico. This can be problematic at times, as some choose a shallow interpretation of what constitutes Mexican culture. We hope to eschew that with this list of deeply impactful musicians with connections to Mexico.

Take a dive into the cultural richness of Mexico by listening to these 10 highly-influential Mexican musicians:

Chavela Vargas

Chavela Vargas

Objectively speaking, Chavela Vargas is a goddess. She dressed as a man, smoked cigars, carried pistols, and had an affair with Frida Kahlo. She is most famous for her rancheras (songs about women typically sung by drunk men) – she did not change the gender pronouns and sang them openly to women. She is known not only for her powerful voice and intense performances but also for her bombastic persona and unapologetic sexuality.
Listen

Selena

Selena

Selena was known as the queen of Tejana music and the Mexican Madonna. Her huge success and popularity spanned both English and Spanish speaking audiences, and blazed a trail for other Latin artists. As Rios de la Luz puts it, “Even with her tragic departure, she is still an icon. She radiates power and what it means to be a xingona (a badass)”. Plus Bidi Bidi Bom Bom has been stuck in our heads for at least twenty years.
Listen

Lila Downs

Lila Downs

Lila Downs uses her incredible three-octave voice to sing in English, Spanish, and the native Mixteco, Zapoteco, Maya and Náhatl languages while weaving together blues, jazz, soul, cumbia, rock, rap and klezmer music. She’s an amazing artist as well as a powerful social activist.
Listen

Holy Mountain

Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain: Original Soundtrack

Jodorowsky was born in Chile to Jewish-Ukrainian parents and split his time between Paris and Mexico City. His movie The Holy Mountain, a “surreal masterpiece”, definitely freaks us out and so does the soundtrack. The soundtrack was released on vinyl with the following description: “The unreleased soundtrack to the most fantastic transcendental spiritual cinematic explosion of our time? The lost Don Cherry album? The missing Jazz Composers Orchestra album featuring Charlie Haden, Carla Bley and Frank Lowe? The Elephant’s Memory soundtrack follow-up to Midnight Cowboy? The lost soundtrack album secretly funded and A&R’d by John Lennon and Yoko Ono? The music to the film that George Harrison was sacked from because he didn’t want us to see his butthole?”
Listen

Rodrigo Y Gabriella

Rodrigo y Gabriella

You’ve heard of dueling pianos, but how about dueling guitars? Not that I would necessarily call Rodrigo y Gabriella’s intensely woven guitar melodies dueling, but their style does take inspiration from a marriage of the ragtime tradition (the historical version, not the modern top-40 regurgitation practiced in some American bars) and Spanish flamenco musicianship. Purely instrumental and fully engrossing, these two masters of guitar from Mexico City infuse latin culture into beautiful arrangements.
Listen

Carla Morrison

Carla Morrison

Carla Morrison has won two Latin Grammys and when she has concerts in Mexico, 60,000 fans sing along to her songs. The New Yorker describes her voice as “Patsy Cline plus Morrissey in Spanish” which is not a bad way to put it.
Listen

La Noche Del Los Hippies

La Noche Del Los Hippies Compilation

Like much of the world, Mexico had its own garage/surf and rock n’ roll scene in the 60’s, getting a little more trippy and psychedelic in the 70’s. If you’re interested in digging into that whole scene, take our recommendation and check out the Mexico-specific comp La Noche Del Los Hippies or Los Nuggetz – 60’s Punk, Pop and Psychedelic from Latin America.
Listen

Los Vinylators

Las Vinylators

Bringing it all back for a revival, the all-girl garage band Las Vinylators came out with this pretty excellent record a couple of years ago, although their whereabouts today are unknown.
Listen

Los João

Los João

Irony is still cool, right? Despite naming themselves after Brazilian musician João Gilberto (and featuring an image of waving gringos), Los João is in fact from Mexico, and their 1983 single Vamos A La Playa is a work of art and a passionate call to arms.
Listen

Murcof

Murcof

Murcof is an electronic musician and composer who combines “electronic minimalism with the orchestral drama of 20th century classical.” He was once a member of the Tijuana based Nortec Collective and he now lives in Spain.
Listen

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Mark Kimber Classic Album Sundays Stavanger Presents Neil Young ‘After The Gold Rush’

For our May 2019 session we celebrate Neil Young classic ‘After The Gold Rush’.

The ’60s were barely over and the ’70s just starting when Neil Young recorded a requiem for the era. The mournful title track to his third album, After the Gold Rush (which was released on Sept. 19, 1970), is ostensibly an ode to the environment, but viewed from other angles, deeper implications surface.

It’s also the end of an early chapter in Young’s career. After breaking from Buffalo Springfield and releasing his debut solo album in 1968, the singer-songwriter would begin what would become the first of many career left turns. On 1969’s Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, he plugged in and scraped away at the scabs with the young Crazy Horse.


Read more: The Story Of Neil Young ‘After The Gold Rush’

But by the following year, when he was set to make a follow-up LP, he had fired them (but retained a few songs they had already laid down) and retreated to his basement in Topanga, Calif., where he started recording tracks for the follow-up record, a 360-degree turn into acoustic country and folk music with a group of musicians whose approach was a bit more delicate.

Rubbing against the plugged-in numbers left over from the Crazy Horse sessions, the new songs — which featured 18-year-old Nils Lofgren on guitar and piano, an instrument he was mostly unfamiliar with — helped create a ragged and almost disjointed record that’s never quite sure if it’s electric or acoustic, part of the ’60s or part of the ’70s.

And it’s a brilliant juxtaposition, one that gives After the Gold Rush a feeling of frustration and resignation. It’s a romantic album too — the soft “Only Love Can Break Your Heart” is a highlight — but the sting of “Southern Man,” which immediately follows in the track listing, tempers the mood.

Join us to experience the album as never before.

Stavanger

Time and Date: 25th May 1:00pm – 3:00pm

Venue

Kunsthall Stavanger, Madlaveien 33, 4009 Stavanger, Norway

Tickets

50 NOK on the door

Presenter

Tarjei Nygård

Audio Menu supplied by Spaceworld Soundgarden

Turntable – Electrocompaniet Ecg-1 Platespiller – Sort, Pre-Amp – Electrocompany Ecp2 Riaa, Amp – Electrocompany EC4.8 Preamplifier, Mono Block – Electrocompany AW600 Nemo Monoblock, Loudspeakers – Electrocompaniet The Nordic Tone Model 1 Gulvstående Høyttaler

The post Classic Album Sundays Stavanger Presents Neil Young ‘After The Gold Rush’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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Amy Beach

Donald Macleod follows Amy Beach’s quest to create a uniquely American sound in her music.

Amy Beach was born in the 19th century and, like all women composers of her generation, she found her path to greatness strewn with obstacles. This week, Donald Macleod charts her struggle to take control of her own destiny and become one of America’s most cherished cultural figures; a composer who helped lead her nation into the mainstream of classical music. Famed conductor, Leopold Stokowski noted that her symphony was “full of real music, without any pretence or effects but just real, sincere, simple and deep music.” In her search to develop her individual voice as a composer, Donald discusses the impact of her religious beliefs, her marriage and the places which shaped her work: her first tour of Europe, and the MacDowell Colony, where she composed most of her later works.

Music featured:
Pastorale, Op 151
Romance, Op 23
Symphony in E minor, Op 32 (Gaelic) (Alla sicilana & Lento)
Evening Hymn, Op 125 No 2
From Grandmother’s Garden, Op 97
The Year’s at the Spring, Op 44 No 1
Valse Caprice, Op 4
Canticle of the Sun, Op 123
Though I take the wings of morning, Op 152
Trio for violin, cello and piano, Op 150
Ah, love, but a day, Op 44 No 2
A Prelude, Op 71 No 1
When far from her, Op 2 No 2
Come, ah come, Op 48 No 1
Nunc Dimittis, Op 8 No 1
Peace I leave with you, Op 8 No 3
Violin Sonata in A minor, Op 34
Symphony in E minor, Op 32 (Gaelic) (Allegro di molto)
Autumn Song, Op 56 No 1
Prelude Op 81
Der Totenkranz, Op 73 No 2
The Candy Lion, Op 75 No 1
Piano Concerto in C sharp minor, Op 45
On a Hill
Je demande à l’oiseau, Op 51 No 4
A Hermit Thrush at Eve, Op 92 No 1
A Hermit Thrush at Morn, Op 92 No 2
Quartet for Strings, Op 89
Ambache
Trois morceaux caractéristiques, Op 28

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Amy Beach https://bbc.in/2VEnUpL

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://bbc.in/2vwHS8q

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spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

 JazzArt Katowice

If many contemporary jazz festivals opt for maximum numbers, gigs-wise, then this well curated event in Katowice, an elegant city in the Silesian region of Poland, keeps the figures under control. Over its four-day term, there are no more than five concerts every 24 hours, which means that timetable clashes and the general audience fatigue that can afflict bigger events are not to be feared. JazzArt breathes. The use of venues such as bookshops and museums, as well as concert halls, such as the large scale Miasta Ogrodow, adds to the overall negotiability within the excitement generated by a programme of national and international artists.

The performance that sums this up more than any other is Erik Friedlander’s imaginative project Block Ice & Propane. Known for his work with John Zorn and Fred Hersch, and solo albums such as 1998’s Topaz, Friedlander appears solo in a calm yet stimulating context. He tells the story of his family’s road trips across America during his childhood that were captured by a series of captivating black-and-white portraits by his father Lee, a professional photographer who packed wife and children into a camper van for the epic journeys. The result is a charming, often candid evocation of a memorable ritual that is vividly brought to life by the images, and Friedlander’s jaunty storytelling and articulate composing. His melodies move from languorous whole notes to agitated eighth-note flurries that capture the intimacy and tension of life at close quarters on the freeways.

Though contending with recurrent tuning issues Friedlander gives a good narrative arc to the set that concludes with a reprise of Eric Dolphy’s ‘Serene’. On the previous evening he was heard as part of the Franco-American quartet Reverso, an interesting band that largely fulfils its mission statement of blending jazz and classical music. Trombonist Ryan Keberle and pianist Frank Woeste prove to be good soloists in a programme of understated harmonies and hard rhythmic edges that also highlights Friedlander’s comping skills in the company of a small group that often punches above its weight.

Spanish double-bassist Giulia Valle, a mainstay of the Barcelona scene for over two decades, more or less accomplishes the same with a trio comprising younger players, pianist Tom Amat and drummer Adri Claremunt, who also feature in her septet. A writer who is able to combine a populist touch with artistic finesse, Valle has a firm grip on the music of the Americas in the widest sense, from jazz to tango to calypso, and the danceable themes are enhanced by her own potent improvisations and smart exchanges with Amat, who also creates ghostly effects on a keyboard. Sadly, Claremunt’s drumming is crash-bang-loud on occasion, drowning out the finer points of the arrangements, which, in the exposed setting of a trio, is problematic, to say the least.

Austria’s Zsamm, on the other hand, is more than happy to bring the noise. Maija Osojnik’s active volcano of electronics and vocals and Patrick Wurzwallner’s equally seismic drums are a culture shock for seated punters who are nonetheless mostly responsive. Punkish, brutish and banshee-like in resonance they have a touch of The Creatures about them, though there is much more improvisation in their aesthetic. As for Norwegian singer Marja Mortensson she has a bracing, at times tempestuous energy that is deeply rooted in the Sami tradition of ‘joik’, a kind of praise song to a person, place or animal. The singer’s nasal timbre is striking, especially as it cast against the soft folds of Daniel Herskedal’s tuba and bass trumpet. The music often has a quality of poignant lament that finds favour with an audience for whom the language barrier is no obstacle at all. Without an avalanche of gigs for listeners to contend with maybe concentration levels are that much higher.

Kevin Le Gendre

from News http://bit.ly/2ZLR0CG
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spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

 JazzArt Katowice

If many contemporary jazz festivals opt for maximum numbers, gigs-wise, then this well curated event in Katowice, an elegant city in the Silesian region of Poland, keeps the figures under control. Over its four-day term, there are no more than five concerts every 24 hours, which means that timetable clashes and the general audience fatigue that can afflict bigger events are not to be feared. JazzArt breathes. The use of venues such as bookshops and museums, as well as concert halls, such as the large scale Miasta Ogrodow, adds to the overall negotiability within the excitement generated by a programme of national and international artists.

The performance that sums this up more than any other is Erik Friedlander’s imaginative project Block Ice & Propane. Known for his work with John Zorn and Fred Hersch, and solo albums such as 1998’s Topaz, Friedlander appears solo in a calm yet stimulating context. He tells the story of his family’s road trips across America during his childhood that were captured by a series of captivating black-and-white portraits by his father Lee, a professional photographer who packed wife and children into a camper van for the epic journeys. The result is a charming, often candid evocation of a memorable ritual that is vividly brought to life by the images, and Friedlander’s jaunty storytelling and articulate composing. His melodies move from languorous whole notes to agitated eighth-note flurries that capture the intimacy and tension of life at close quarters on the freeways.

Though contending with recurrent tuning issues Friedlander gives a good narrative arc to the set that concludes with a reprise of Eric Dolphy’s ‘Serene’. On the previous evening he was heard as part of the Franco-American quartet Reverso, an interesting band that largely fulfils its mission statement of blending jazz and classical music. Trombonist Ryan Keberle and pianist Frank Woeste prove to be good soloists in a programme of understated harmonies and hard rhythmic edges that also highlights Friedlander’s comping skills in the company of a small group that often punches above its weight.

Spanish double-bassist Giulia Valle, a mainstay of the Barcelona scene for over two decades, more or less accomplishes the same with a trio comprising younger players, pianist Tom Amat and drummer Adri Claremunt, who also feature in her septet. A writer who is able to combine a populist touch with artistic finesse, Valle has a firm grip on the music of the Americas in the widest sense, from jazz to tango to calypso, and the danceable themes are enhanced by her own potent improvisations and smart exchanges with Amat, who also creates ghostly effects on a keyboard. Sadly, Claremunt’s drumming is crash-bang-loud on occasion, drowning out the finer points of the arrangements, which, in the exposed setting of a trio, is problematic, to say the least.

Austria’s Zsamm, on the other hand, is more than happy to bring the noise. Maija Osojnik’s active volcano of electronics and vocals and Patrick Wurzwallner’s equally seismic drums are a culture shock for seated punters who are nonetheless mostly responsive. Punkish, brutish and banshee-like in resonance they have a touch of The Creatures about them, though there is much more improvisation in their aesthetic. As for Norwegian singer Marja Mortensson she has a bracing, at times tempestuous energy that is deeply rooted in the Sami tradition of ‘joik’, a kind of praise song to a person, place or animal. The singer’s nasal timbre is striking, especially as it cast against the soft folds of Daniel Herskedal’s tuba and bass trumpet. The music often has a quality of poignant lament that finds favour with an audience for whom the language barrier is no obstacle at all. Without an avalanche of gigs for listeners to contend with maybe concentration levels are that much higher.

Kevin Le Gendre

from News http://bit.ly/2ZLR0CG
via IFTTT

Discogs Staff DJs Bringing Their Gems To Crate Diggers Brighton

Our largest Crate Diggers Record Fair to date, Crate Diggers Brighton, is coming up May 11! The Brighton Centre will be home for a day to record sellers and collectors from all over the UK – and a few from mainland Europe. It’s all about thanking the Discogs community and celebrating record culture together, so as always entrance to the record fair is free (starting at 10AM). You can expect more than 100 tables of crates to dig through, craft beers, and DJ sets by Mr. Thing, Nick The Record, and DJ Format. The cool thing is that the records you hear these DJs spin will be for sale! Ahead of the event, we asked them about their best digging finds and what they will be bringing to Brighton next week.

DJ Format

DJ Format

First record you bought?

I think the first record I owned was Complete Madness but I got it for Christmas when I was 10 years old. One of the first records I remember buying was Schoolly D’s first LP but I also used to buy a lot of hip hop 7″s around that time because they were very cheap, usually 50p or £1 in Woolworth’s. That was in the mid-late 80s when I was about 15.

Most unexpected find in recent years?

A few months ago I played a gig with Cut Chemist in London. On my way to meet him in Eldica Records the next day I stopped in a charity shop and found Soul Cure by The Power Pack (great album by UK library legend Nick Ingman). There’s no better way of getting everyone motivated for a day of digging than finding a record like first thing in the morning!

Record Shops or Record Fairs?

As long as I’m ‘physically’ digging through records, I’m at my happiest. Digging online doesn’t give me the same buzz, I like to look at the records in the flesh and touch them, turn over the cover and read the credits etc. The downside to so many record shops and record fairs nowadays is they seem to live & die by Discogs prices, often without bothering to take into account the fact that so many ‘chancers’ list records at ludicrous prices that nobody ever pays!

How do you use Discogs in your day to day digging?

Over the last 10 years it seems that Discogs has shaped the way that most of us ‘dig’, even though I don’t really consider it proper digging. It’s a great thing to be able to get instant access to a record that you would probably never otherwise find in a lifetime of digging in shops. I probably buy 75% of my records on Discogs nowadays so it’s a major part of my daily life… what a sad b*stard I’ve become haha!

Any treats in your record box for May 11’s Crate Diggers?

Absolutely! I’m certainly not a record dealer and don’t buy records to sell them but I’m pulling lots of records from my personal collection so they can find new homes and someone else can enjoy them. I have 2 copies of many records I own so I’m trying to be less of a hoarder and let go. Anything you hear me play in my DJ set that day will be for sale…mostly soul, funk, rock & jazz LPs but I’ll also have some interesting 7″s too, especially old hip hop 45s.

Nick The Record

Nick The Record

First record you bought?

Elvis Costello – Oliver’s Army and I remember singing it, doing the best gruff voice an 8 year old could muster for my class at school. No idea what the name of that class was.

Record Shops or Record Fairs?

Both, but fairs tend to win by a hair.

How do you use Discogs in your day to day digging?

When I’m out at shows or in shops I make sure to have my headphones with me & if I see something interesting I don’t know, or just want to remind myself how It sounds I’ll reach for Discogs & see if there is a video.

I often see people at record fairs these days with a big stack pulled aside & looking everything up on Discogs hoping for bargains. If you are stopping other potential buyers seeing the records it’s not cool. Sure pull out a stack & check 2 or 3 but not a whole stack. There is a very strong possibility that the seller already looked them up on Discogs.

Any treats in your record box for May 11’s Crate Diggers?

I’m writing this whilst in America on a buying & gigging trip so I’ll have plenty of fire in the boxes but not sure what yet.

Mr. Thing

Mr. Thing

First record you bought?  

Not very cool to a lot of people but I have to admit to it being “Kings Of The Wild Frontier” by Adam & The Ants. The total opposite of what I got into a year or so down the line!

Most unexpected find in recent years?

Found a super rare funk 45 at a car boot sale a few years ago that wasn’t in a sleeve and in a box of bad 80s pop 12”s, apparently was only sold locally at the time at gigs!

Record Shops or Record Fairs?

I love both equally, can’t walk past either without going in and I love the social aspect of buying and selling at both!

How do you use Discogs in your day to day digging?

Mainly to check if I haven’t got it already … but also to check on pressing variants/bootlegs and things like that, find it very useful in that regard!

Any treats in your record box for May 11’s Crate Diggers?

Definitely got some heavyweight titles I’ve been keeping back for the fair, but got a lot of cheaper titles and some solid classics as well, see you there!

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Brighton! Come digging with us and stay for the After Party: Jurassic 5 presents: The Fullee Love Collective, David Rodigan, General Levy, Zion Train, Jehst and the legendary Sister Sledge are ready to set the dance floor on fire!

Get your tickets for the after party now. Are you ready for an INCREDIBLE day?

The post DJs Bringing Their Gems To Crate Diggers Brighton appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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