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Date

May 7, 2019

Music Freelance A guide to Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9

Rating: 
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Premiere:

Kärnthnerthor Theatre, Vienna, 7 May 1824

The Ninth was Beethoven's first symphony for more than a decade, though at least one of its elements had originated much earlier: a letter written as far back as 1793 advised of the composer's intention to set Friedrich Schiller's 'Ode to Joy', while a tiny sketch dated to 1798 makes use of some of its words. Similar fragments of the text were worked on during 1812 in connection with a piece that would become the Namensfeier Overture.

The earliest sketch containing music that would actually appear in the Ninth dates from 1815, when the opening idea of the scherzo occurs as a fugue subject. A commission for a new symphony from the Philharmonic Society in London in 1817 provided further impetus; pages dated to this period contain ideas that were later worked up into the first movement. More serious work was done in 1822 with a sketch outlining the melody to which the opening of Schiller's Ode would eventually be sung. 

 

 

Such examples are typical of the processes by which Beethoven arrived at his completed compositions. They also make clear that the highly original conception of the Ninth – not only in terms of the surprising intervention of vocal forces to transform the finale of the work virtually into a cantata, but also in the sheer vastness of the whole, in which Beethoven expanded the time-scale of the symphony beyond that even of the Eroica – was arrived at only after much consideration.

 

 

Wider impact: 

If the originality of Beethoven's conception scarcely needs stressing, nor does its impact on later composers. Symphonists from Mendelssohn to Mahler, Shostakovich and Britten learned that the inclusion of a text could direct the listener's attention towards a programmatic or philosophical intention. Wagner, too, saw the combination of notes and words in the Ninth as seminal to his own conception of music drama, and for that reason celebrated the laying of the foundation stone of his new theatre at Bayreuth in 1872 with a performance of it under his own baton.

In wider and indeed the widest circles, the Ninth Symphony continues to make an unprecedented impact. To whatever extent one thinks it appropriate that the main idea of the finale has become celebrated in our day as the anthem of the European Union, or (far more dubiously) as the musical accompaniment to the marketing of a whole range of commercial products, consciousness of this fragment of Beethoven's epic creation could scarcely be more widespread. It reflects the fact that the rich and complex humanism of this symphony, and indeed of the entire Beethovenian heritage, has never been so widely valued – as well, perhaps, as so needed – as it is at the present time.  

 

 

 

Recommended recording: 

Benefiting (as many recent recordings do) from Jonathan Del Mar's edition of the score, one of the finest modern versions of the Ninth Symphony finds conductor Osmo Vänskä and his Minnesota Orchestra on their tautest 

form in a 2006 account, notable for its keen focus on detail, its intelligent and sensitive handling of tempo relationships, and its overall organic integrity. 

Juntunen, Karnéus, Norman, Davies; Minnesota Chorale & Orchestra/Vänskä

BIS BISSACD 1616

 

 

 

Words by George Hall. This article first appeared in the December 2015 issue of BBC Music Magazine.

 

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loquearde Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For March 2019

We are madly in love with how the last ranks are shaping. Last month, we had the chance to meet The Sonics. And no, they weren’t the band you already knew. Fascinating how unearthing old records can also help to unearth the history and graphic material related to the bands who created those. With this precedent in mind, we couldn’t be any more excited to reveal that this month’s chart has also introduced to us a band we never saw before in any of our Top 30s.

The band in question is Cherry Five and most likely won’t ring the bell for most of you. But if we mention that Cherry Five was the seed to Italian psych-rockers Goblin, then a lot of you would likely know who we’re talking about. Yes, the legendary band behind some of the most iconic giallo films directed by Dario Argento weren’t called Goblin from the very beginning.

It didn’t take us long to find about a website compiling information about Italian progressive rock bands called Italian Prog where we could find more information about Cherry Five:

Though the LP cover notes only list two musicians’ names, singer Tony Tartarini (previously known as Toni Gionta and former singer with L’Uovo di Colombo) and drummer Carlo Bordini (that also played in a duo Rustichelli & Bordini), the group also included three members of Goblin, keyboard wizard Claudio Simonetti, guitarist Morante and bass player Pignatelli, with the first two of them being credited as composers for all the album tracks.

A genuine rarity, due to the Goblin connection and the small number of copies pressed, Cherry Five album was pressed in 1975, as demonstrated by the date on the label, but released in January 1976. By the way the recording dates on the cover are false, it had been recorded in 1974, not 1975.

Obviously, there’s much more we can talk about in our latest Top 30. Coincidences happen here, and it turns out our number 2 was also released by a psychedelic rock band called Apple. But this copy was sold for a really high price and just the artwork of An Apple A Day is well worth your time.

In the rest of the top 30 most expensive items sold in March, there’s a bit of something for everyone! Always great to see in there beloved artists like Guided By Voices, The Grateful Dead, David Bowie, The Beatles, Pet Shop Boys, The Cramps, Bad Brains, The Who…all of them properly mixed with more obscure records. We feel like we’re talking too much, so we’ll let our Top 30 do the rest of the talking. Scroll down to see which records were sold for big bucks in March 2019 on Discogs:

  1. Sonny Clark - Cool Struttin'

    Sonny Clark – Cool Struttin’

    Sold for $1348.00 Label: Blue Note
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: US
    Released: 1958
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop

  2. Sabbat - Sabbat

    Sabbat – Sabbat

    Sold for $1348.00 Label: Evil Records
    Format: 7″, Ltd
    Country: Japan
    Released: 1985
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Black Metal

  3. Guided By Voices - Propeller

    Guided By Voices – Propeller

    Sold for $1350.00 Label: Rockathon, Old Age / No Age
    Format: LP, Album, Ltd, Num, W/Lbl
    Country: US
    Released: 1992
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Indie Rock, Lo-Fi

  4. Wooden Horse - II

    Wooden Horse – II

    Sold for $1363.00 Label: York Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1973
    Genres: Rock, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk Rock

  5. Grateful Dead* - Europe '72: The Complete Recordings

    Grateful Dead* – Europe ’72: The Complete Recordings

    Sold for $1400.00 Label: Grateful Dead Records, Rhino Records (2)
    Format: 73xHDCD + Box, Ltd
    Country: US
    Released: 2011
    Genres: Rock, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk Rock, Rock & Roll, Psychedelic Rock, Country Rock

  6. Mayhem - Deathcrush

    Mayhem – Deathcrush

    Sold for $1404.00 Label: Posercorpse Music
    Format: 12″, EP, Ltd
    Country: Norway
    Released: 1987
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Black Metal

  7. Bobby Boyd Congress - Bobby Boyd Congress

    Bobby Boyd Congress – Bobby Boyd Congress

    Sold for $1460.00 Label: Okapi Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: France
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Jazz, Funk / Soul
    Styles: Funk

  8. Tomorrow's People - Open Soul

    Tomorrow’s People – Open Soul

    Sold for $1460.00 Label: Stage Productions
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul, Funk, Disco

  9. David Bowie - The Man Who Sold The World

    David Bowie – The Man Who Sold The World

    Sold for $1493.00 Label: Mercury
    Format: LP, Album, M/Print
    Country: UK
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Classic Rock, Glam

  10. Doug Hammond & David Durrah - Reflections In The Sea Of Nurnen

    Doug Hammond & David Durrah – Reflections In The Sea Of Nurnen

    Sold for $1500.00 Label: Tribe (3)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1975
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Soul-Jazz

  11. Eminem - Infinite

    Eminem – Infinite

    Sold for $1500.00 Label: Web Entertainment
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1996
    Genres: Hip Hop
    Styles: Hardcore Hip-Hop, Boom Bap

  12. The Beatles - Please Please Me

    The Beatles – Please Please Me

    Sold for $1558.00 Label: Parlophone
    Format: LP, Album, Mono, Gol
    Country: UK
    Released: 1963
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Beat, Rock & Roll

  13. Pet Shop Boys - Electric

    Pet Shop Boys – Electric

    Sold for $1578.00 Label: The Vinyl Factory, x2 (2)
    Format: Box, Album, Ltd + 12″, Ora + 12″, Yel + 12″, Pin +
    Country: UK
    Released: 2013
    Genres: Electronic, Pop
    Styles: Synth-pop, House

  14. Black Spirit (4) - Black Velvet

    Black Spirit (4) – Black Velvet

    Sold for $1599.00 Label: Krios
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Genres: Funk / Soul

  15. Sangie Davis* And L. Perry* / Devon Irons & Doc Alimantado* - Words / Vampire

    Sangie Davis* And L. Perry* / Devon Irons & Doc Alimantado* – Words / Vampire

    Sold for $1623.00 Label: Black Art
    Format: 12″
    Country: Jamaica
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Reggae
    Styles: Roots Reggae

  16. Anno Domini (2) - On This New Day

    Anno Domini (2) – On This New Day

    Sold for $1634.00 Label: Deram
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Folk Rock, Prog Rock

  17. Cliff Jordan* - Cliff Craft

    Cliff Jordan* – Cliff Craft

    Sold for $1642.00 Label: Blue Note
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: US
    Released: 1957
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop

  18. Paul McCartney And Wings* - Wings 1971-73

    Paul McCartney And Wings* – Wings 1971-73

    Sold for $1644.00 Label: MPL (2), Capitol Records, UMe
    Format: 7xCD, Comp, Dlx, Ltd, Num, RE, RM + 3xDVD-V + Blu-
    Country: N/A
    Released: 2018
    Genres: Rock, Pop
    Styles: Pop Rock, Rock & Roll

  19. David Bowie - Space Oddity

    David Bowie – Space Oddity

    Sold for $1776.00 Label: Philips, Philips
    Format: 7″, Single, Mono, Sol
    Country: UK
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Classic Rock

  20. The Show Boys - Run With A Knife

    The Show Boys – Run With A Knife

    Sold for $1948.00 Label: Not On Label (The Show Boys Self-released)
    Format: 7″, W/Lbl
    Country: Jamaica
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Reggae
    Styles: Reggae

  21. Celest Hardie - You're Gone / That's Why I Cried

    Celest Hardie – You’re Gone / That’s Why I Cried

    Sold for $1948.00 Label: Reynolds Records
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1972
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Rhythm & Blues

  22. The 7th Avenue Aviators* - You Should ‘O Held On / Boy Next Door

    The 7th Avenue Aviators* – You Should ‘O Held On / Boy Next Door

    Sold for $2000.00 Label: Congress
    Format: 7″, Single, Promo
    Country: US
    Released: 1965
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  23. Bad Brains - Pay To Cum!

    Bad Brains – Pay To Cum!

    Sold for $2000.00 Label: Bad Brain Records
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1980
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hardcore, Punk

  24. Bee Vee and The Honey Bee - I'm Lost Without Your Love

    Bee Vee and The Honey Bee – I’m Lost Without Your Love

    Sold for $2250.00 Label: Sting (6)
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Gospel, Soul, Disco

  25. The Cramps - Songs The Lord Taught Us

    The Cramps – Songs The Lord Taught Us

    Sold for $2368.00 Label: Illegal Records (2)
    Format: LP, Album, TP, Dif
    Country: UK
    Released: 1980
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk, Psychobilly, Garage Rock

  26. The Who - My Generation

    The Who – My Generation

    Sold for $2471.00 Label: Decca
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Japan
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Mod, Beat

  27. The Dirty Filthy Mud* - The Forest Of Black

    The Dirty Filthy Mud* – The Forest Of Black

    Sold for $2500.00 Label: Worex
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1968
    Genres: Electronic, Rock
    Styles: Psychedelic Rock

  28. Bob & Fred, Baha Strings - I'll Be On My Way (Part 1)

    Bob & Fred, Baha Strings – I’ll Be On My Way (Part 1)

    Sold for $2500.00 Label: Big Mack
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1966
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  29. Apple (4) - An Apple A Day

    Apple (4) – An Apple A Day

    Sold for $3651.00 Label: Page One
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Psychedelic Rock, Pop Rock

  30. Cherry Five - Cherry Five

    Cherry Five – Cherry Five

    Sold for $3932.00 Label: Cinevox
    Format: LP, Album, Gat
    Country: Italy
    Released: 1975
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Prog Rock

The post Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For March 2019 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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A Leg Up For Lauren – this Thursday, May 9th at The Bowery Electric. Be there for the auction (and…

via The Real Mick Rock http://bit.ly/2YfjIud

spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

After last year’s swelter, Cheltenham Festival offered a more temperate climate for 2019’s week of jazz – a genre where cool is always welcome. There was a cool new venue too – a Gilles Peterson curated pop-up (pop-down?) nightclub in a department store basement offering a hipster counterpoint to mainstage big names including Gregory Porter, Incognito and Jamie Cullum. Overall it seemed that, along with a wider UK jazz audience, the town was turning out for the occasion. 

Three jazz big guns featured on Saturday to slightly mixed results, with John Surman’s appearance with the Brass Project disappointingly light on the saxophonist’s own playing. John Warren’s hour-long composition ‘Traveller’s Tale’ felt monochromatic, lacking in variety of tone, though Chris Laurence’s bass made a notably lively contribution. Over in the Big Top Abdullah Ibrahim once again proved that, like a skilled homeopath, he dispenses the minimum of his own playing needed to satisfy an audience. Apart from occasional interjections and an occasional linking segue, he left his band Ekaya to carry the gig.

By contrast the opening witty deconstruction of ‘Mack The Knife’ established that Joshua Redman (top) was out to enjoy himself. He powered through a set that ranged from smoking funk-bopper ‘Tailchase’ to the lusher balladry of ‘Never Let Me Go’ before welcoming Soweto Kinch for an unannounced guest spot. The two ripped into some hard-bopping blues, trading solos with proper competitive vigour to the great amusement of impressive bass man Reuben Rogers.

TD Soweto Kinch 10

The festival’s ‘Trios With A Twist’ theme also included Kinch’s own gig opening things at the Parabola Theatre, associate curator Tony Dudley-Evans’ favoured venue for more adventurous music. SUNLIGHT (above) pitched the saxophonist and MC together with astounding Swiss vocal artist Andreas Schaerer and Finnish guitarist Kalle Kalima. What ensued was remarkable: a largely improvised stream of musical consciousness loosely woven around Kinch’s rap-style lyrics, musically shifting from free jazz to hip-hop and prog to schmaltz. What unified it was the vocalist’s phenomenal range, incorporating scat, vocal experimentation and beatboxing into a flexible sonic vocabulary that shapeshifted into whatever the music called for.

Hermia Ceccaldi Darrifourcq gave a third impressive ‘twisted trio’ gig with the additional curveball that illness brought dep saxophonist Quentin Biardeau into the band’s strongly original (and highly combative) set. Slamming into the relentlessly physical monotone of ‘Someone Burned The Pie’, drummer Sylvain Darrifoucq and cellist Valentin Ceccaldi created a furious post-industrial onslaught that rarely let up. One number even included an alarm clock, and by the end half the audience were exhilarated, half exasperated… but all were wide awake.

TD Julia Campiche 05

More subtle, yet equally impressive, Swiss harpist Julie Campiche’s (above) UK debut revealed a unique voice both in her electronically processed instrument and the style of her playing. Her quartet steered their way through the lengthy ‘Onkalo/To The Holy Land’ suite with remarkable empathy, managing extended electronic spells and shifting rhythmic forms with seamless precision.

Anticipation for the Rymden (below) concert in the Jazz Arena had been high and not disappointed by the Scandinavian supertrio of EST rhythm section Dan Berglund and Magnus Öström with Norwegian renegade Bugge Wesseltoft. Their music was highly textured, rarely sounding like a conventional piano trio, with effortless shifts of gear and mood that fed moments of coordinated technical brilliance few others could hope to emulate.

TD Rymden 16

But for sheer entertainment Cuban pianist Omar Sosa’s tireless grin and exuberant exploration of Afro-Cuban style with singer/violinist Yilian Cañizares and percussionist Gustavo Palacios was incomparable. Whether pounding rich montuno, sweeping a romantic ballad or even dancing energetically with the vocalist his music lifted the spirits and brought the audience to their feet long before their triumphant finish was drowned in huge applause.

Tony Benjamin

Photos by Tim Dickeson

from News http://bit.ly/2VqNPC8
via IFTTT

spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

After last year’s swelter, Cheltenham Festival offered a more temperate climate for 2019’s week of jazz – a genre where cool is always welcome. There was a cool new venue too – a Gilles Peterson curated pop-up (pop-down?) nightclub in a department store basement offering a hipster counterpoint to mainstage big names including Gregory Porter, Incognito and Jamie Cullum. Overall it seemed that, along with a wider UK jazz audience, the town was turning out for the occasion. 

Three jazz big guns featured on Saturday to slightly mixed results, with John Surman’s appearance with the Brass Project disappointingly light on the saxophonist’s own playing. John Warren’s hour-long composition ‘Traveller’s Tale’ felt monochromatic, lacking in variety of tone, though Chris Laurence’s bass made a notably lively contribution. Over in the Big Top Abdullah Ibrahim once again proved that, like a skilled homeopath, he dispenses the minimum of his own playing needed to satisfy an audience. Apart from occasional interjections and an occasional linking segue, he left his band Ekaya to carry the gig.

By contrast the opening witty deconstruction of ‘Mack The Knife’ established that Joshua Redman (top) was out to enjoy himself. He powered through a set that ranged from smoking funk-bopper ‘Tailchase’ to the lusher balladry of ‘Never Let Me Go’ before welcoming Soweto Kinch for an unannounced guest spot. The two ripped into some hard-bopping blues, trading solos with proper competitive vigour to the great amusement of impressive bass man Reuben Rogers.

TD Soweto Kinch 10

The festival’s ‘Trios With A Twist’ theme also included Kinch’s own gig opening things at the Parabola Theatre, associate curator Tony Dudley-Evans’ favoured venue for more adventurous music. SUNLIGHT (above) pitched the saxophonist and MC together with astounding Swiss vocal artist Andreas Schaerer and Finnish guitarist Kalle Kalima. What ensued was remarkable: a largely improvised stream of musical consciousness loosely woven around Kinch’s rap-style lyrics, musically shifting from free jazz to hip-hop and prog to schmaltz. What unified it was the vocalist’s phenomenal range, incorporating scat, vocal experimentation and beatboxing into a flexible sonic vocabulary that shapeshifted into whatever the music called for.

Hermia Ceccaldi Darrifourcq gave a third impressive ‘twisted trio’ gig with the additional curveball that illness brought dep saxophonist Quentin Biardeau into the band’s strongly original (and highly combative) set. Slamming into the relentlessly physical monotone of ‘Someone Burned The Pie’, drummer Sylvain Darrifoucq and cellist Valentin Ceccaldi created a furious post-industrial onslaught that rarely let up. One number even included an alarm clock, and by the end half the audience were exhilarated, half exasperated… but all were wide awake.

TD Julia Campiche 05

More subtle, yet equally impressive, Swiss harpist Julie Campiche’s (above) UK debut revealed a unique voice both in her electronically processed instrument and the style of her playing. Her quartet steered their way through the lengthy ‘Onkalo/To The Holy Land’ suite with remarkable empathy, managing extended electronic spells and shifting rhythmic forms with seamless precision.

Anticipation for the Rymden (below) concert in the Jazz Arena had been high and not disappointed by the Scandinavian supertrio of EST rhythm section Dan Berglund and Magnus Öström with Norwegian renegade Bugge Wesseltoft. Their music was highly textured, rarely sounding like a conventional piano trio, with effortless shifts of gear and mood that fed moments of coordinated technical brilliance few others could hope to emulate.

TD Rymden 16

But for sheer entertainment Cuban pianist Omar Sosa’s tireless grin and exuberant exploration of Afro-Cuban style with singer/violinist Yilian Cañizares and percussionist Gustavo Palacios was incomparable. Whether pounding rich montuno, sweeping a romantic ballad or even dancing energetically with the vocalist his music lifted the spirits and brought the audience to their feet long before their triumphant finish was drowned in huge applause.

Tony Benjamin

Photos by Tim Dickeson

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CAS Classic Album Sundays Los Angeles Presents Neil Young ‘After the Gold Rush’

We are very pleased to announce the return of CAS Los Angeles at In Sheep’s Clothing!

Joining Zach in regular rotation for all future hosting duties will be Kegan Simons, Lauren Levy, and Bryan Ling.

For the May session Kegan will be presenting Neil Young’s iconic After the Gold Rush.

Please join us as Kegan tells us the story of this legendary recording after which we’ll listen to the album in full on our world class soundsystem.


Read more: The Story Of Neil Young ‘After The Gold Rush’

Join us to experience this album as never before.

Los Angeles

Date and Time: Sunday May 19 2019 4:00PM – 7:00PM PDT

Venue

In Sheep’s Clothing, 710 E 4th Pl, Los Angeles, CA 90013

Tickets

$15 in advance 

Presenter

Kegan Simons

Audio Menu

The post Classic Album Sundays Los Angeles Presents Neil Young ‘After the Gold Rush’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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Freya Parr Free Download: Pianist Charles Owen plays Brahms

'An imagination and warmth of playing, perfectly captured by recording engineers'

This week's free download is the second of Brahms's Six Klavierstücke, the Intermezzo in A – Allegro temeramente, performed by pianist Charles Owen and recorded on the Avie label. It was the Instrumental Choice in the February issue of BBC Music Magazine.

DOWNLOAD INSTRUCTIONS:

If you'd like to enjoy our free weekly download simply log in or sign up to our website.

Once you've done that, return to this page and you'll be able to see a 'Download Now' button on the picture above – simply click on it to download your free track.

If you experience any technical problems please email support@classical-music.com. Please reference 'Classical Music Free Download', and include details of the system you are using and your location. If you are unsure of what details to include please take a screenshot of this page.

read more

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