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Date

May 13, 2019

Goldmine1 The latest reviews of Power Pop releases

The latest reviews for the Power Pop Plus blog by John M. Borack — releases from Brad Marino to Van Duren.

The post The latest reviews of Power Pop releases appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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“My heroes were not photographers—they were crazy poets like the French Symbolists, the English…

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

jfl On ClassicsToday: Vienna Philharmonic’ Mahler’s 8th at the Konzerthaus

Vienna Aroused: Mahler’s Eighth Still Does the TrickMay 12, 2019 by Jens F. LaursonVienna, May 11, 2019; Vienna Konzerthaus—Even in times of inflationary Mahler performances, a Mahler Eighth is something special. It was notable from the moment you set foot into the Vienna Konzerthaus on this past Saturday afternoon. The mood was different. A little tense, a little hushed in anti…  Continue

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Music Freelance A guide to Vaughan Williams’s Symphony No. 1 ‘A Sea Symphony’

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Vaughan Williams discovers Walt Whitman and studies with Maurice Ravel, who both influence his first great orchestral works. This continuously choral symphony sets words from Walt Whitman’s Sea Drift and Passage to India, abridged by the composer. The four movements relate to an expanded classical symphonic design of opening Allegro, slow movement, Scherzo, and Finale. Their titles are: ‘A Song for All Seas, All Ships’, ‘On the Beach at Night Alone’, ‘The Waves’, and ‘The Explorers’.

 

Premiere: October 1910
Leeds Town Hall
Leeds Festival Chorus/Orchestra

On 12 October 1910, his 38th birthday, Ralph Vaughan Williams (VW) stepped onto the podium in Leeds Town Hall to conduct the Leeds Festival Chorus and Orchestra in the first performance of his Sea Symphony. The journey towards the self-knowledge to achieve this epic masterwork had been long and unpredictable. VW had been no prodigy, and his childhood musical progress seems to have owed as much to application as to natural facility.

At Trinity College, Cambridge, he read history while also studying at the Royal College of Music in London – first with Charles Wood, then with Charles Stanford. ‘Stanford was a great teacher,’ he later wrote. ‘But I believe I was unteachable.’

Marriage to the reserved and beautiful Adeline Fisher was followed by many years of musical apprenticeship in London where, despite a family allowance that meant he did not need to earn a living, VW worked conscientiously as a church organist and choral conductor.

 

 

Influences

Much energy was also going into collecting English folksongs. He was beginning to sense how the melodic qualities of this treasure house of material could generate the possibility of larger orchestral forms, and a musical voice of uncanny vividness began to emerge in In the Fen Country  (1904) and the fetchingly beautiful Norfolk Rhapsody No. 1 (1906). Other factors were coming together, too. Toward the Unknown Region  (1907) was the first product of a life-changing encounter with the verse of Walt Whitman and its tone of aspirational, mind-expanding spiritual adventure. Meanwhile, the wistful regretfulness of Whitman’s polar opposite among poets, AE Housman, inspired another major achievement: the chamber song-cycle On Wenlock Edge (1909).

By now the 30-something composer, still sensing a need to learn, had taken himself to Berlin to study with Max Bruch, then to Paris. There, Maurice Ravel gave his English pupil’s music what Vaughan Williams later liked to describe as some ‘French polish’. Ravel’s teaching amounted to a lot more than ‘polish’: it was the decisive element that finally set VW’s imagination free to roam on the largest scale. He recalled  how the French master-composer showed him ‘how to orchestrate in points of colour rather than in lines’.

 

 

A Sea Symphony had begun life as The Ocean in 1903. So the six years of its creation charted the composer’s parallel journey of self-discovery – by way of the first movement’s broad choral and orchestral strokes (a sturdy tribute to Stanford and Parry), and towards the spiritual immensities searched out with shimmering, Ravel-inspired mastery in the symphony’s finale, ‘The Explorers’. The unforgettable setting of Whitman’s invocation to ‘Steer for the deep waters only’ made its own point: here was a composer now fully equipped to do so.

 

Recommended recording:

Isobel Bailie (soprano), John Cameron (baritone)

London Philharmonic Orchestra/ Adrian Boult

Decca 473 2412 (5 discs)

 

 

 

 

 

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