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Retailers of Vinyl, CDs, DVDs etc. through Amazon, Ebay, Discogs, iHaveit, MusicStack and CD & LP. A friend of Help Musicians UK.

Date

June 24, 2019

Moon_Ray Discogs Database In Review: Which Country Has The Most Expensive Music?

It’s nearing the middle of the year, and we’re seeing the seasons in full swing via the number of submissions to the Discogs Database. Submissions are down, but total contributions were actually not as low as in previous years, buoyed by a stable number of release edits, as well as increases in artist edits and release videos.

One thing that never seems to go down is the price some people are willing to pay for rare music. We recently updated our list of the Top 100 Most Expensive Records ever sold on the Discogs Marketplace, and following the suggestions of Discogger Madang in the article comments, we started diving in a little deeper into our marketplace data to reveal the most expensive US, UK, German, French, and Italian releases ever sold (keep your eyes peeled for more breakdowns in the coming weeks).

After looking at all those lists I asked myself…

Which Country Has The Most Expensive Music?

Discogs charges an 8% fee on the sale price of any item sold in our marketplace, and the maximum fee for any single item is $150 USD, no matter how expensive it is. That means that for any item sold for $1,875 USD or more, the fee is always the same. Let’s call these items “Very Expensive Items.”

Taking all the Very Expensive Items — 459 in total over the marketplace’s 14 years — I looked at the release country and the year of release for every VEI to see if there were any significant patterns.

Unsurprisingly, the majority of VEIs come from the US, followed by the UK. This pattern matches that of the total number of releases in the database by country. Japan comes in at number three for VEIs, which is interesting because there are more German and French releases in the database than Japanese releases. That said, the proportion of US VEIs compared to total US releases in the database is higher than that of Japan.

This could be due to the fact that there are many, many items released both in the US and other countries (i.e. with more than one release country), which might skew the data set. It could also be due to a higher concentration of cashed up collectors — we’re not completely sure! Let me know in the comments why you think this might be the case.

Breaking down the distribution of VEIs by year of release gives some more color to the picture. The oldest is from 1934, the newest from 2016, but 72% were released between 1960 and 1980.

Older stuff is more likely to be rare and therefore more valuable, but there doesn’t seem to be a direct correlation between age and the price of VEIs. Is this just old rich collectors reliving the glory days of their youth? There are so many potential variables here, it could be any number of things. Let us know what you think the main cause or any other contributing factors may be in the comments!

Overview Of Database Contributions

Total Contributions for May 2019

Daily Submissions

Daily Submissions for May 2019

Top Contributors

Top Contributors for May 2019

Updates To The Submission Guidelines

There are no new updates to the Submission Guidelines from April 2019.

Want to learn more about how Discogs is built?
Ready to submit a new Release to Discogs?
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The post Discogs Database In Review: Which Country Has The Most Expensive Music? appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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James Ferraro and Dälek added to OUT.FEST 2019 line-up

via The Wire: Home http://bit.ly/2IIS9ER

Alex Ross Monk’s ATLAS, Davis’s Central Park Five

Earth Songs. The New Yorker, July 1, 2019.

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Goldmine1 Let’s cut some vinyl! A tour of Little Elephant Lathe Cuts

Owner Rob Courtney gave Goldmine a tour of Little Elephant Lathe Cuts where he walked us through his company’s process of getting a vinyl record pressed and into your hands.

The post Let’s cut some vinyl! A tour of Little Elephant Lathe Cuts appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Fritz Novotny has died

via The Wire: Home http://bit.ly/2Ybo9qf

“A soul is a little more difficult to get out. People’s souls are very mysterious — but the…

via The Real Mick Rock http://bit.ly/31Ua02T

falsepriest Why Do Music Books Matter, And What Do They Have To Do With Discogs?

Music is an experience. It’s a vehicle to another dimension. It pokes and pulls at you right in the feelings. Why would you read about music, when you can listen to it?

In his 33⅓ book on Big Star’s Radio City, Bruce Eaton posits that the scarcity of information surrounding the band actually helped him enjoy the music more. Without being distracted by trivia about the band, their personalities, or explanations of songs, the only meaning he gleaned from a track came from the music and lyrics. Anything more than that is static interference.

This makes sense to a point, but obviously even he didn’t stick to that argument for long, having written a book on that album. Anyone who picked up a biography about a rock god, subscribed to a weekly music rag, or lost hours perusing liner notes knows exactly why reading about music can be just as valuable as listening to it. I have a feeling you might be one of us.

Because music is such a transcendent experience, you always want more. You want to know what went down in the studio that led to that genius guitar lick, what was going on in the songwriter’s life that yielded such dark lyrics, what makes our musical heroes seem so other.

Without the stories behind the music, it’s harder to understand the nuances of the music itself, the context of certain albums, ideas or themes some artists center their entire careers on. For better or worse, as a society, it’s rare that we let things speak for themselves. It’s human nature to want the gritty details.

Bookogs database

As much as the internet has done for us (we wouldn’t both be here at this very moment without it — so thanks for that, internet!), it hasn’t done a whole lot for longform writing, deep thought, or teasing out ideas into fully developed conclusions. This type of thought and writing still seems to be reserved for print.

Music criticism can help reveal details in the music that we may have missed or put that swelling feeling you get when your favorite track comes on into words. It arms you for arguments with differing musical opinions. Or maybe it even introduces you to an album you hadn’t quite reached for yet. Magazines are able to anchor releases to a very particular time and space in music history. Genre compendiums introduce us to new worlds of music — or solidify and celebrate our love for a subculture.

This is where Bookogs comes in. Bookogs is working on cataloging as many music biographies, memoirs, lyric collections, photography books, magazines — any and all printed volumes with music at their core — as possible, then connecting them to the artists they’re associated with on Discogs. “Bibliophonic” is our week-long submission drive for all music books. It’s a call to arms for music fans and collectors. Add your music books to Bookogs!

For this submission drive, we’re aiming to get 1,000 music books added to Bookogs. Get involved and watch your name ascend the leaderboard as you get what’s on your shelves into the database, track the progress on the goal, and check out the latest music book additions. You can also keep up with us as we publish daily articles about how music books helped build the Discogs database, what it’s like to write a biography on one of rock’s biggest bands, the changing role of music magazines in a post-Spotify world, and more.

What Does This Have To Do With Discogs?

We’re all here because we’re passionate about music and the physical experience of stuff, right? We’re also concerned with cataloging, tracing, and preserving music history, giving proper credit to the artists, collaborators, and people whose names aren’t at the top of the bill — whose names might even be buried several hundred pages in — and building on the release data warehoused in the Discogs Database.

If you’re a big music fan, your collection probably doesn’t end with records. It probably includes many music books (as well as film and posters, but that’s a story for another time). By bringing the books about your favorite bands and artists into the Discogs Database, we want to close the loop for music fanatics, add another dimension of music data, and thread it all together with narrative.

Your submissions can make the difference. Get your music books off the shelves and into the database, and help music fans like you discover more about the artists they love!

Submit music books for the Bibliophonic drive

The post Why Do Music Books Matter, And What Do They Have To Do With Discogs? appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Freya Parr Ukrainian baritone Andrei Kymach wins BBC Cardiff Singer of the World 2019

Rating: 
0

Andrei Kymach was crowned BBC Cardiff Singer of the World 2019 at the competition final on Saturday at St David’s Hall, Cardiff. He beat over 400 singers from across the globe to win the Main Prize, which includes £20,000 as well as the Cardiff trophy. 

BBC Music Magazine spoke to Kymach just minutes after he left the stage following his win. ‘I’m very excited about it,’ he said. ‘It was a very good atmosphere and I felt the audience supported me a lot’. 

 


Winner Andrei Kymach

The Ukrainian baritone, 31, sang arias by Bizet, Rachmaninov and Donizetti to win the title, alongside the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ariane Matiakh and Ewa Strusińska. ‘I chose music to describe the different colours in my voice,’ said Kymach. ‘I wanted to sing an aria from Rachmaninov’s Aleko, which is all about love and pain.’

 


Andrei Kymach with the other finalists: (L-R) Patrick Guetti, Guadelupe Barrientos, Sooyeon Lee and Mingjie Lei

 

 

In a first for the competition, Kymach will also be offered a recital at the Queen Elizabeth Hall at London’s Southbank Centre as part of his prize.

 


Mingjie Lei, winner of the Song Prize

Kymach competed with four other finalists, including tenor Mingjie Lei, who was awarded the Song Prize earlier in the week. The Dame Joan Sutherland Audience Prize was won by Katie Bray from England, and was dedicated to the memory of Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the late baritone who won the competition back in 1989. 

 


Katie Bray, winner of the Dame Joan Sutherland Audience Prize
 

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falsepriest Why Do Music Books Matter, And What Do They Have To Do With Discogs?

Music is an experience. It’s a vehicle to another dimension. It pokes and pulls at you right in the feelings. Why would you read about music, when you can listen to it?

In his 33⅓ book on Big Star’s Radio City, Bruce Eaton posits that the scarcity of information surrounding the band actually helped him enjoy the music more. Without being distracted by trivia about the band, their personalities, or explanations of songs, the only meaning he gleaned from a track came from the music and lyrics. Anything more than that is static interference.

This makes sense to a point, but obviously even he didn’t stick to that argument for long, having written a book on that album. Anyone who picked up a biography about a rock god, subscribed to a weekly music rag, or lost hours perusing liner notes knows exactly why reading about music can be just as valuable as listening to it. I have a feeling you might be one of us.

Because music is such a transcendent experience, you always want more. You want to know what went down in the studio that led to that genius guitar lick, what was going on in the songwriter’s life that yielded such dark lyrics, what makes our musical heroes seem so other.

Without the stories behind the music, it’s harder to understand the nuances of the music itself, the context of certain albums, ideas or themes some artists center their entire careers on. For better or worse, as a society, it’s rare that we let things speak for themselves. It’s human nature to want the gritty details.

Bookogs database

As much as the internet has done for us (we wouldn’t both be here at this very moment without it — so thanks for that, internet!), it hasn’t done a whole lot for longform writing, deep thought, or teasing out ideas into fully developed conclusions. This type of thought and writing still seems to be reserved for print.

Music criticism can help reveal details in the music that we may have missed or put that swelling feeling you get when your favorite track comes on into words. It arms you for arguments with differing musical opinions. Or maybe it even introduces you to an album you hadn’t quite reached for yet. Magazines are able to anchor releases to a very particular time and space in music history. Genre compendiums introduce us to new worlds of music — or solidify and celebrate our love for a subculture.

This is where Bookogs comes in. Bookogs is working on cataloging as many music biographies, memoirs, lyric collections, photography books, magazines — any and all printed volumes with music at their core — as possible, then connecting them to the artists they’re associated with on Discogs. “Bibliophonic” is our week-long submission drive for all music books. It’s a call to arms for music fans and collectors. Add your music books to Bookogs!

For this submission drive, we’re aiming to get 1,000 music books added to Bookogs. Get involved and watch your name ascend the leaderboard as you get what’s on your shelves into the database, track the progress on the goal, and check out the latest music book additions. You can also keep up with us as we publish daily articles about how music books helped build the Discogs database, what it’s like to write a biography on one of rock’s biggest bands, the changing role of music magazines in a post-Spotify world, and more.

What Does This Have To Do With Discogs?

We’re all here because we’re passionate about music and the physical experience of stuff, right? We’re also concerned with cataloging, tracing, and preserving music history, giving proper credit to the artists, collaborators, and people whose names aren’t at the top of the bill — whose names might even be buried several hundred pages in — and building on the release data warehoused in the Discogs Database.

If you’re a big music fan, your collection probably doesn’t end with records. It probably includes many music books (as well as film and posters, but that’s a story for another time). By bringing the books about your favorite bands and artists into the Discogs Database, we want to close the loop for music fanatics, add another dimension of music data, and thread it all together with narrative.

Your submissions can make the difference. Get your music books off the shelves and into the database, and help music fans like you discover more about the artists they love!

Submit music books for the Bibliophonic drive

The post Why Do Music Books Matter, And What Do They Have To Do With Discogs? appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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