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Retailers of Vinyl, CDs, DVDs etc. through Amazon, Ebay, Discogs, iHaveit, MusicStack and CD & LP. A friend of Help Musicians UK.

Date

July 11, 2019

SoLil Crate Minds: Meet Discogs Record Seller Andy of AndyGrayRecords

In our Crate Minds series, we put the spotlight on the people behind the Discogs accounts. Whether running a brick-and-mortar shop, selling from a storage space or from their living room, there is one thing all sellers have in common: An incredible passion for music. We spoke with Discogs record seller Andy Gray of AndyGrayRecords to hear his story!

What’s your name and role?
My name is Andy and I do everything! My typical working day is from about 10am till 1 or 2 am, I look after an elderly relative in between subbing/listing releases. I’m also the cook of the house, my girlfriend is the breadwinner, so I get the evening meal ready for her coming home and we have a couple of hours in front of the TV in the evening before I go back to Discogs! My Discogs username AndyGrayRecords is based on my real name and the fact I like records.

When did you start selling records on Discogs?
Since I rejoined in October 2011.

How did you get into selling records?
I’ve always sold them, right from pre-internet times. Used to swap them in school. And then when I grew up I used to advertise in Record Collector and then once the internet started I used Gemm, Amazon and Ebay. At the time there was no Discogs marketplace but I used Discogs as a resource. Then I had a few years off. I was actually doing volunteer work in an Oxfam shop and they had to close due to persistent burglary and rising insurance premiums – so for a small donation I took away their whole stock of vinyl. So I went straight to Discogs as I felt like I owed you something back.

Do you have a physical record shop, or do you sell online only? Where are you based?
No, I’m just online. I have a website although at the moment it just points to Discogs. I’m based in East Anglia. Lowestoft to be precise, which is the most easterly town in England. I’m just a mile from the coast.

Discogs record seller, Andy Gray Records' shelves of vinyl records

What is your specialty?
I’m not sure! I would probably say 7″ records – I have a constant stock of over 4,000 no matter how many I sell, I always have more to list. I try and add images and runout info to them all, and over the years have built up a good knowledge of pressing plants and mastering engineers.

What would you say is your favorite record in stock right now, and why this one?
Current favourite record is by a band called City of Thieves. I have followed them since their early days when they were called Four Wheel Drive. I know two of the band members, Ben and Jamie, who also run Teambeats: they do corporate team bonding whereby they get a bunch of people with no/little musical experience and they give them an instrument. They then teach them parts of a song and within a few hours they have them able to play the song.

And what was the most memorable item you ever sold?
Probably Avalon ‎– “Going Thru / Gypsy Secrets”. It’s not the most expensive record, but I only paid 10p for it so it represents the best value!

Can you tell us what your own record collection looks like?
I have a couple hundred LPs and a handful of singles. I had about 500 or so in my early twenties. When I left home I just had a room in a shared house, so my collection mostly stayed at my mum’s house. And then when I got married I still didn’t really have room for anymore than about 50 records. Then my mum downsized and moved and I had nowhere for my records (this was pre-internet days) so I just gave them to a friend. I wish I still had them now!

Do you have a personal holy grail record?
I don’t really have one, but I wouldn’t say no to a copy of  Keith Cross & Peter Ross ‎– “Bored Civilians”.


And your favorite Record Shop?
Sound It Out in Stockton: Great staff and they kept the flag flying when all other shops were closing.

What is the funniest thing that has happened to you when selling records?
In the UK there used to be a chain of shops called Andy’s Records…the owner was also called Andy Gray – he now runs the BGO label – so anyway he has bought records off me two or three times, he actually lives in the same county as me. He started off by selling ex-jukebox records on a market stall in the 1960s.

What would be your number one tip for buyers on Discogs?
I have several… I think the main one is to read the feedback, the seller terms and the item description. Secondly I think if you find a good seller you should stick with them, they may not always have what you want but I’m sure they’ll always have something for you and lastly don’t be afraid to buy a VG record.

And for Discogs record sellers?
Be honest. Grade as though you were the buyer. Ask yourself if you’d be happy with that grade if you had bought it if the answer is no then go down a grade. Check label images and runouts, make sure you list the exact pressing!

Anything else you’d like us to know?
I’m registered as self-employed with the taxman – my sole income comes from selling records and it mostly gets reinvested in more records. When I buy a job lot of records I have found that only 30-40% are already on Discogs, there’s so much out there that needs cataloguing!

 
Find yourself a gem from AndyGrayRecords and follow them here:
Discogs | Website | Facebook | Twitter

The post Crate Minds: Meet Discogs Record Seller Andy of AndyGrayRecords appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Morton Feldman box set forthcoming

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“What the fuck was I going to do with my life? Be an academic like my parents wanted me to be?…

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Charles T. Downey À mon chevet: My Struggle, Book 6

À mon chevet is a series of posts featuring a quote from whatever book is on my nightstand at the moment.

For my own part, the transgressional was associated with an enormous sense of freedom on the one hand, and enormous shame on the other, played out in a rather unsophisticated fashion in a few too many beers followed by a couple of hours of undesirable yet delightfully unfettered behavior as

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Music Freelance BBC Music Magazine Quiz: Potatoes

Rating: 
0

1) Which Italian composer was nicknamed Il Prete Rosso (‘The Red Priest’) due to the colour of his hair?

 

2) How did Dvořák subtitle his Ninth Symphony, written while he was director of New York’s National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892-5?

 

3) For whose coronation at Westminster Abbey in 1902 did Hubert Parry compose the choral anthem ‘I Was Glad’, a work that has been sung at British coronations ever since?

 

4) On which British island, complete with its own opera house, is the expulsion of German forces in 1944 marked each May by the Liberation International Music Festival?

 

5) Played here by mezzo Joyce DiDonato, name the girl who, married to Albert, drives the infatuated eponymous hero to suicide in Massenet’s Werther.

 

6) Can you name the BBC Radio 3 programme that, hosted by early music specialist David Munrow from 1971-6, was known and loved for its accessible approach to a wide range of music?

 

7) Which 1907 opera by Rimsky-Korsakov ends when Tsar Dodon is killed by the very creature he had obtained to protect him?

 

8) Which famous artist designed the sets and costumes for the first ever production of Satie’s Parade (1917), Falla’s Three-cornered hat (1919) and Stravinky’s Pulcinella (1920)?

 

9) Founded in 1926 as a publication for dance band musicians, which British journal went on to cover rock and pop music until its closure in 2000?

 

10) Now it’s time for the fun bit. Taking one or two words from each answer so far, what is the theme that links this month’s quiz?

 

Answers

1) Vivaldi
2) ‘From the New World’
3) King Edward VII
4) Jersey
5) Charlotte
6) Pied Piper
7) The Golden Cockerel
8) Pablo Picasso
9) Melody Maker
10) Potatoes

 

How did you score?

8 – 10 out of 10: My spud-ness! Your knowledge is far from rösti

5-7 out of 10: Your score is a chip off the old block

1-4 out of 10: Your knowledge is a little mashed

0 out of 10: Pomme de poor

 

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Mark Kimber Classic Album Sundays Los Angeles Presents AIR ‘Moon Safari’

We are very pleased to announce the return of CAS Los Angeles at In Sheep’s Clothing!

Joining Zach in regular rotation for all future hosting duties will be Kegan Simons, Lauren Levy, and Bryan Ling.

For the July session Bryan will be presenting Air’s iconic “Moon Safari”.

Please join us as Bryan tells us the story of this legendary recording after which we’ll listen to the album in full on our world class soundsystem.

Los Angeles

Time and Date: Sunday July 21st 2019 12:00pm – 3:00pm

Venue

In Sheep’s Clothing, 710 East 4th Place, Los Angeles, CA 90013

Tickets

Available Here

Presenter

Bryan Ling

Audio Menu

Klipsch Klipschorn AK6 Loudspeakers, Audio Note M5 Tube Phono Preamplifier, Audio Note Jinro Shochu Tube Amplifier, Condesa Carmen Rotary Mixer, Garrard 301 Turntables restored by Woodsong Audio, in Vinylista Plinths with Auditorium 23 Hommage Mats, Tonearms, Headshells & Cartridges by Thomas Schick.

The post Classic Album Sundays Los Angeles Presents AIR ‘Moon Safari’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

We were getting in at the beginning: the first public airing of a new foursome of recognisable talents with a set of specially composed material. After saxophonist Mark Lockheart’s unnecessarily apologetic introduction we were swept away on an engaging tide of contemporary jazz-rock. Within minutes it was apparent that this project has the capacity to gel into something that definitely exceeds the sum of its parts. From the free-form opening of ‘Efflorescence’, with Dave Smith’s clattering percussion and Elliot Galvin’s scattershot synth, to the rollicking old-school groove of ‘Mingle Tingle’, this was a textbook exposition of improvisatory playing turning tightly constructed music into pure fun.

Given the cresting wave of electronic dance derived jazz right now this was a determinedly retro-facing project, referencing the music’s rock-informed heyday (albeit the later, more sophisticated No Wave style of John Zorn, inspiration for the tune ‘Jay Zee’). One highlight was the delicious ‘Gangster Rat’, a tribute to Bristolian hero Banksy, with Tom Herbert’s thunking precision on his incongruously tiny violin bass guitar locked into Smith’s expressive backbeat. Crouched behind his keyboards Elliot Galvin grabbed at the groove, then mashed it as Lockheart’s insistent tenor took control once again. Smiles abounded on stage and throughout the Fringe’s enthusiastic audience.

By contrast ‘Sixteen’ had a kind of psychedelic fluidity within which the four players let themselves roll along. It had the unhurried easiness of the 1960s West Coast, unison phrasing slipping in and out of focus, with Smith’s cross rhythms and cymbal washes smoothing the sense of flow. By contrast ‘Mingle Tingle’’s four-bar riff had a danceable urgency, the swirling Hammond keyboards over four-to-the-floor drumming recalling Brian Auger.

From Loose Tubes to Polar Bear and beyond, Lockheart’s capacity to be ahead of the jazz curve is undeniable. In this quartet his combination of lyrical economy and harmonic creativity has found three improvisatory soul mates who clearly know how to make the most of his compositions in their own terms. With their fiery music and obvious sense of fun there’s every chance that this band will coalesce into something very successful.

Tony Benjamin (story and photos)

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Freya Parr Six of the best choral arrangements of spirituals

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'My Soul’s Been Anchored in the Lord' arr. Moses Hogan

New Orleans-born composer and arranger Moses Hogan was renowned for his arrangements of Negro spirituals, publishing over 70 such works, many of which were compiled in the 2002 Oxford Book of Spirituals. Hogan’s arrangement of 'My Soul's Been Anchored in the Lord' makes use of deliciously varied vocals. The range of the bass voices is established very early on, following an electric and grabbing introduction.

The changes in texture are captivating: the majestic full-choir contrasts with bold solo bass passages, and this balanced handling of vocal parts continues throughout. Just when you think you know where the song is going, a wonderful antiphonal section breaks out between the female and male voices. The sopranos’ starring moment in the last phrase is the cherry on top of the cake. 

 

 

'Ezekiel Saw de Wheel' arr. William Dawson

Telling the story of the Old Testament prophet Ezekiel's divine vision, this song has been recorded by many well-known American singers, including baritone Paul Robeson and blues singer John Lee Hooker. This was one of Dawson's final arrangements of his career, following a handful of original compositions.

This particular arrangement is a true tour de force, which will stretch the capabilities of most choirs. The brilliance of this arrangement is the cyclical nature and multi-layered writing, which means you can feel the ‘wheel’ turning in the air with the sound. This is particularly noticeable towards the end of the piece when the entire ensemble sings the title lyrics. The solo alto line is particularly striking, establishing itself with a soulfulness to complement the full-bodied sound of the choir. 

 

 

'You Must Have that True Religion' arr. Roland Carter

This is considered core repertoire for historically black college university (HBCU) choral ensembles. The beauty of any great spiritual is the ability to not just have one type of texture throughout, but various sections that take the listener on a musical journey. This arrangement does exactly that.

The lyrics emphasise the honesty and truth to a religion that one should possess to earn the ultimate prize in heaven. The entire ensemble states this at first, then a soprano soloist above the group, ending with a wonderfully contrapuntal section. The men in this section traditionally start slower, singing ‘true religion, true religion, true religion’, which increases in speed until it sounds like a locomotive engine building up steam.

 

 

'I Know I’ve Been Changed' arr. Damon Dandridge

This is another example of an arrangement made up of many different choral configurations of the main theme. With soloists, separate sections for men and women and call-and-response reverberating throughout the main choir, there is a constant change in texture throughout. These multiple sections allow the listener to feel as though they have travelled with the choir on a musical journey and have, in fact, been changed – just as the title suggests. Damon Dandridge, like Roland Carter (above) works with choirs in historically black college universities in the US.

 

 

'I’ll Stand' arr. Raymond Wise

This is a wildly athletic spiritual which takes precision and clarity to pull off.  This spiritual is asking whether you will stand for your Jesus or Religion. Its brilliance lies in the speed at which the two-note motif travels throughout the chorus. It’s a real crowd-pleaser.

Raymond Wise is a professor of African American studies and director of the African American Choral Ensemble at Indiana University Bloomington, having begun his musical career at the age of three, singing gospel music with his family singing group 'The Wise Singers'. He is also an ordained priest and has recorded a huge amount of African American music with various ensembles.

 

 

'I Just Come from the Fountain' arr. André Thomas

The title and lyrics of this spiritual refer to a fountain of life-sustaining holy water, with a section that rhythmically repeats ‘been drinking’. Again, it’s a very antiphonal work, with interactions between the bass and treble voices, which creates a really great effect. Audiences can almost see the sound bouncing back and forth around the ensemble. André Thomas is a current professor of music at Florida State University, and is a published author as well as a conductor and composer, having written Way Over in Beulah Lan': Understanding and Performing the Negro Spiritual.

 

This article was written by Eric Conway, director of the Morgan State Unviersity Choir. Details of their upcoming performances can be found here.

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Freya Parr Six of the best choral arrangements of spirituals

Rating: 
0

'My Soul’s Been Anchored in the Lord' arr. Moses Hogan

New Orleans-born composer and arranger Moses Hogan was renowned for his arrangements of Negro spirituals, publishing over 70 such works, many of which were compiled in the 2002 Oxford Book of Spirituals. Hogan’s arrangement of 'My Soul's Been Anchored in the Lord' makes use of deliciously varied vocals. The range of the bass voices is established very early on, following an electric and grabbing introduction.

The changes in texture are captivating: the majestic full-choir contrasts with bold solo bass passages, and this balanced handling of vocal parts continues throughout. Just when you think you know where the song is going, a wonderful antiphonal section breaks out between the female and male voices. The sopranos’ starring moment in the last phrase is the cherry on top of the cake. 

 

 

'Ezekiel Saw de Wheel' arr. William Dawson

Telling the story of the Old Testament prophet Ezekiel's divine vision, this song has been recorded by many well-known American singers, including baritone Paul Robeson and blues singer John Lee Hooker. This was one of Dawson's final arrangements of his career, following a handful of original compositions.

This particular arrangement is a true tour de force, which will stretch the capabilities of most choirs. The brilliance of this arrangement is the cyclical nature and multi-layered writing, which means you can feel the ‘wheel’ turning in the air with the sound. This is particularly noticeable towards the end of the piece when the entire ensemble sings the title lyrics. The solo alto line is particularly striking, establishing itself with a soulfulness to complement the full-bodied sound of the choir. 

 

 

'You Must Have that True Religion' arr. Roland Carter

This is considered core repertoire for historically black college university (HBCU) choral ensembles. The beauty of any great spiritual is the ability to not just have one type of texture throughout, but various sections that take the listener on a musical journey. This arrangement does exactly that.

The lyrics emphasise the honesty and truth to a religion that one should possess to earn the ultimate prize in heaven. The entire ensemble states this at first, then a soprano soloist above the group, ending with a wonderfully contrapuntal section. The men in this section traditionally start slower, singing ‘true religion, true religion, true religion’, which increases in speed until it sounds like a locomotive engine building up steam.

 

 

'I Know I’ve Been Changed' arr. Damon Dandridge

This is another example of an arrangement made up of many different choral configurations of the main theme. With soloists, separate sections for men and women and call-and-response reverberating throughout the main choir, there is a constant change in texture throughout. These multiple sections allow the listener to feel as though they have travelled with the choir on a musical journey and have, in fact, been changed – just as the title suggests. Damon Dandridge, like Roland Carter (above) works with choirs in historically black college universities in the US.

 

 

'I’ll Stand' arr. Raymond Wise

This is a wildly athletic spiritual which takes precision and clarity to pull off.  This spiritual is asking whether you will stand for your Jesus or Religion. Its brilliance lies in the speed at which the two-note motif travels throughout the chorus. It’s a real crowd-pleaser.

Raymond Wise is a professor of African American studies and director of the African American Choral Ensemble at Indiana University Bloomington, having begun his musical career at the age of three, singing gospel music with his family singing group 'The Wise Singers'. He is also an ordained priest and has recorded a huge amount of African American music with various ensembles.

 

 

'I Just Come from the Fountain' arr. André Thomas

The title and lyrics of this spiritual refer to a fountain of life-sustaining holy water, with a section that rhythmically repeats ‘been drinking’. Again, it’s a very antiphonal work, with interactions between the bass and treble voices, which creates a really great effect. Audiences can almost see the sound bouncing back and forth around the ensemble. André Thomas is a current professor of music at Florida State University, and is a published author as well as a conductor and composer, having written Way Over in Beulah Lan': Understanding and Performing the Negro Spiritual.

 

This article was written by Eric Conway, director of the Morgan State Unviersity Choir. Details of their upcoming performances can be found here.

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