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Date

July 24, 2019

Goldmine1 Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September

Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September 20 from Rhino Records.

The post Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Goldmine1 Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September

Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September 20 from Rhino Records.

The post Ramones ‘It’s Alive’ 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition available in September appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Mark Kimber Rocky Mountain Audio Fest 2019: Talk Talk ‘The Colour Of Spring’

Few bands have reinvented themselves as successfully as Talk Talk did in the middle of the 1980s. Following a string of international chart hits, including ’84’s iconic ‘It’s My Life’ and ‘Such A Shame’, Mark Hollis, Lee Harris, and Paul Webb bid a hasty retreat from the melodramatic synth pop for which they had become known. By the middle of the decade, the electronic juggernaut of the new wave was buckling under the pressure of guitar-based indie rock, exemplified in Britain by the likes of The Smiths and Primal Scream. Bored of the increasingly image-obsessed and overtly-commodified pop landscape, and perhaps a little frustrated by their lack of major UK success, Hollis had found the perfect opportunity to divert Talk Talk’s trajectory towards far more oblique and mysterious territory.

The Colour Of Spring was indeed a significant departure from the band’s earlier, neon-lit aesthetic. The shimmering, hyper-real surfaces of yesteryear were replaced by strikingly organic visions of beauty, as Talk Talk ditched the synthesisers in favour of a far more traditional, yet no less moving amalgamation of guitar, piano and organ. Hollis drew influence from sources as unlikely as Otis Redding and Burt Bacharach, but the band’s 1986 single ‘Life’s What You Make It’ was most inspired by the front-man’s favourite band; the German krautrock powerhouse CAN. It was a cyclical, psychedelic whirlwind over a scorched desert terrain, which nonetheless became the band’s biggest ever UK commercial success and gave Talk Talk the financial security that would later allow them to venture further off the beaten path with Spirit Of Eden.


Read: Rocky Mountain Audio Fest 2019: Steely Dan ‘Aja’

Talk Talk’s pivot to improvisation was not yet complete during the writing process for The Colour Of Spring, but its growing influence on the band’s creative approach was already showing. Between the more conventional songs, such as the dance-floor-primed ‘Living In Another World’, free-flowing compositions such as the piano and organ-driven ‘April 5th’ hint at the deeply meditative style to which Talk Talk would later become synonymous. The transition is perhaps most explicit in the way Hollis uses his voice: a vapour trail in a darkened room, drifting and shape-shifting before melting into the ether. Whilst his lyrics retain their tantalising intrigue they feel less important than before, as if the front-man has allowed his ego to be subsumed by the rich sonic mirage.

With Spirit of Eden rightly lauded as the band’s brooding minimalist masterpiece, it was perhaps inevitable that The Colour Of Spring would become perhaps the most overlooked album in Talk Talk’s impressive discography. But for many who had written off the band as lacklustre outcasts with no charisma, Talk Talk’s third album was integral to both winning back their attention and convincing them of the latent potential in their increasingly sublime music. Hollis would spend the rest of his relatively short career rewarding this reconciliation and challenging preconceptions, defying an industry that craves conformation and marketability by producing intelligent albums which urged us to consider life and music beyond the boundaries set before us.

Owen Jones


Read: Classic Album Sundays at Rocky Mountain Audio Fest 2019

Listen to our mini playlist celebrating The Colour Of Spring below via Spotify.


 

The post Rocky Mountain Audio Fest 2019: Talk Talk ‘The Colour Of Spring’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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Unknown Dip Your Ears, No. 246 (Accordion-Journey: Teodoro Anzellotti in Satie)


Erik Satie, Keyboard Works arr. for Accordion
Teodoro Anzellotti
(Winter & Winter)

Transcriptions and adaptations of music for accordion are not that hard to find; it’s an instrument that lends itself to grabbing music written for other – especially keyboard – instruments and it hasn’t that much original classical music in the repertoire to fall back on. But there are few accordion

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Mute share The Normal’s contribution to its box of John Cage 4’33” takes

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Mute share The Normal’s contribution to its box of John Cage 4’33” takes

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Discogs Staff Crate Diggers Profile: BreweryTown Beats

With only a few days to go until Crate Diggers New York, we shine the spotlight on BreweryTown Beats – located in the heart of Philadelphia and specializing in funk, soul, and hip-hop. We spoke with owner Max Ochester about running a brick and mortar record store, Philly jazz and what we can expect to find in his crates during Crate Diggers NYC on Saturday, July 27.

Tell us about BreweryTown Beats, its background and those involved.

Beats opened in late 2014 in the Brewerytown section of Philadelphia and over the past 5 years and one change of location, we have grown from a single employee to three full/part-time employees. We have a beautiful storefront with a healthy number of items on Discogs and more recently we have been venturing into reissuing rare and unreleased Philadelphia records.

What do you specialize in?

Nothing other than GOOD music. All the employees have a deep knowledge of one or many aspects of Philadelphia music but also all music in general. We are known as a “funk, soul, hip-hop & jazz” store but we strive to include all genres of music. Just quality tunes at cheap prices.

Front exterior of BreweryTown Beats in Philadelphia

What are some of your favorite records on your shelves right now and why these?

This is a good day to ask this question. We just bought a modest in number but big in quality record collection off of the daughter of Philly jazz pianist James “Sid” Simmons. Sid played with Grover Washington Jr for several years as a touring pianist but before that he played on some of my favorite Philly records including but not limited to Byard Lanacaster / J.R. Mitchell’s – Live At Macalester College 72.

What memories stand out from the past 5 years of Beats?

There are so many but over and over again memories are being made at the several live events we host in the shop. Things like the monthly Vinyl Tap 215 – a group of like-minded vinyl obsessed friends who get together every first Saturday for an all-vinyl DJ session, sharing music, food, stories, and love.

When did you first start selling on Discogs?

In 2014, right about when the store opened. At first, it was just to move some of the pricier items to keep the doors open but now it is a full-on operation and we are looking to keep pushing the numbers in the coming months.

What would be your number one tip for buyers on Discogs?

There’s a few. Firstly, support your local record shop – if we can’t keep our doors open then we can’t get the collections that come through and in turn provide a consistent quality product. Secondly, deal direct with your seller – don’t use Paypal Claims or negative feedback as the go-to. Most sellers will be glad to work directly with the buyer to resolve any issues. Lastly, some things are sold in the store, it just happens – it’s part of the game these days.

And for Discogs record sellers?

Grade fairly, communicate often, and provide a good product. It’s that simple.

What does your own record collection looks like?

For the past two years, I have been collecting strictly Philadelphia music, all genres and conditions. I have hundreds if not thousands of Philly 12”s, Gospel records, lounge records, outsider folk-rock LP’s – anything that has a Philly address, phone number or studio I am all over it.

Anything unexpected turn up?

At this point nothing is unexpected, I’ve had too many instances where the average collection turns up something dope. Most notably the Ron Everette LP that was sleeveless in a pile of 30 records brought to us in a moldy, dirty suitcase. After all that the record was still in VG condition. I recently upgraded to another VG copy, this time however it had a cover!

logo of BreweryTown Beats in Philadelphia, PA

What can we expect to find at your table during the fair?

Lots of funk, soul, jazz and hard-to-find LP’s. Rare Philly stuff on both LP & 45. Just solid tunes for the people to enjoy.

Will you be digging at Crate Diggers yourself? Anything in particular that you’re hoping to find?

I ALWAYS dig, it doesn’t matter where I go and this will be no exception. I have several labels / artists I am looking for and would pick up if I saw them. For example, I need three more Black Jazz records to complete the label.. Anyone got any of those?

Anything else you’d like us to know?

Besides releasing the previously Unreleased 1973 Sounds Of Liberation LP we have their first “Self-Titled” record remastered and submitted for an October release, we are also working on a Philly soul LP that is extremely rare and one of the best soul records I have heard to date. Hopefully getting that back just before Christmas. Check us on IG for the latest info too @BrewerytownBeats.

Don’t sleep on the free record fair, Crate Diggers NYC, happening this weekend at Playstation Theater. More information about the fair and the after-party can be found here.


post for crate diggers nyc 2019

The post Crate Diggers Profile: BreweryTown Beats appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Moscow’s fifth Fields Festival happens next month

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Goldmine1 Peter Frampton gives his farewell to the road

Peter Frampton opens up about his ‘goodbye tour’ and newly recorded material by The Peter Frampton Band.

The post Peter Frampton gives his farewell to the road appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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