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October 2019

Goldmine1 Billy Vera’s ‘The Specialty Records Story’ to be released by BMG Books in November

RPM Series volume chronicles Little Richard, Sam Cooke and others with Billy Vera’s ‘The Specialty Records Story’ to be released by BMG Books on November 5.

The post Billy Vera’s ‘The Specialty Records Story’ to be released by BMG Books in November appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Goldmine1 Heart’z Ann and Nancy Wilson talk about this year’s “Love Alive” tour

HEART–ANN and NANCY WILSON–triumphantly returned to the road this year for their first tour in more than three years and the trendsetting, multiple-platinum Rock & Roll Hall of Fame legends talk about it in a new Q&A.

The post Heart’z Ann and Nancy Wilson talk about this year’s “Love Alive” tour appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Roy Montgomery’s Scenes From The South Island reissued

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English Heritage blue plaque for Ronnie Scott’s jazz club

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Music Freelance BBC launches Seven Worlds, One Planet soundtrack and videos on Spotify

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In conjunction with David Attenborough’s new documentary series Seven Worlds, One Planet, BBC Studios and Spotify have launched a collection of exclusive content, including a playlist of the soundtrack for the series by Hans Zimmer and Jacob Shea.

Seven new videos not seen in the documentaries have been released on Spotify. They feature wildlife stories from around the globe, and Zimmer’s and Shea's original soundtrack can be found alongside these.

Their music responds to 20 animals and natural phenomena featured in the documentaries, including albatrosses facing extinction, the Northern Lights and Golden snub-nosed monkeys.

 

Attenborough’s new series explores the contrasting environments of the seven continents of the world and how they each foster their own distinctive ecosystem. The first episode aired on 27 October and new episodes can be caught on Sundays at 6.15pm GMT on BBC One and BBC iPlayer.

The new content is available to both Spotify Premium and Free users from today (31 October) in addition to a podcast hosted by BBC presenter Emily Knight and featuring series producers and members of the camera crew.

‘We’re constantly looking for fresh, innovative ways of storytelling, and these videos along with Hans Zimmer’s stunning soundtrack will help to bring the story of the seven different continents to life for a whole new generation,’ says Jasmine Dawson from BBC Studios.

Both the Zimmer/Shea soundtrack and the seven videos accompanying the documentary can be found here.

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Mark Kimber The Story of Nina Simone ‘Black Gold’

Recorded in 1969 and released in 1970, Black Gold was one of the final albums released before Nina Simone’s time in the United States came to an abrupt end. The recording captures a performance given at New York’s Philharmonic Hall, in front of a sold-out crowd. Simone had released numerous live albums during the ‘60s, most of which were recorded in New York City at Midtown venues such as Carnegie Hall and The Town Hall. This concert found Simone at the very peak of both her fame and political passion, reflected in the incredible quality of the performance and her inspired choice of material.

Black Gold features a mixture of traditional folk songs, original compositions, and cover versions upon which Simone puts her own spin. She opens the performance with ‘Black Is the Colour of My True Love’s Hair’ a song with roots in Scotland, where it was first played as a ballad with lyrics referencing the River Clyde. It later found its way to the Appalachian Mountains and was reworked by musicians such as John Jacob Niles, who transformed the traditional melody into a new tune played in the modal manner. The song had since been covered extensively by artists including Jo Stafford and Joan Baez, and eventually found its way into the standard repertoire of Simone, who revitalised the song’s mainstream popularity.

This is swiftly followed by arguably Simone’s most widely beloved song ‘Aint Got No – I Got Life’. It had originally been released just a year prior to the performance, in 1968, as a single from her album ‘Nuff Said, and was an instant success charting at number 2 in the UK and number 1 in the Netherlands. The song appealed greatly to a younger audience and was in fact a medley of two numbers taken from the Broadway musical Hair. Its infectiously upbeat attitude marked it as one of the most joyous moments in Simone’s discography – a radical statement of self-love and acceptance which was predictably co-opted by countless advertising agencies. Her soaring and rapid rendition on Black Gold is buoyed by the rhythm section’s vibrant energy, bristling with a percussive movement that only heightens the song’s life-affirming message.

The rhythmic thrust continues on ‘Westwind’, a song which Simone learned from her friend, the South African singer Miriam Makeba. Nicknamed “Mama Africa”, she was a fellow civil rights activist and a United Nations goodwill ambassador who had used her fame as a singer, songwriter, and actress to fight the apartheid regime in her country. It was Makeba’s belief that activism and popular culture could support one another when the two were entwined, and she held friendships with Marlon Brando, Lauren Bacall, Louis Armstrong, and Ray Charles during her time in the US..

Simone’s sharp and dry sense of humour on Black Gold creates a contrast which imbues its most melancholy moments with an even greater potency. ‘Who Knows Where the Time Goes’ is perhaps the most viscerally moving song of the entire performance, possessing a simplicity and universality which resounds with incredible power. Inspired by another folk composition (this time written by Sandy Denny of the British band the Strawbs), she performs the song with a sparse arrangement accentuated by flourishes of late-night jazz from her piano.

But Black Gold is especially notable for its performance of one of SImone’s finest civil rights anthems, ‘To Be Young Gifted And Black’. Recorded and released in 1969 it was written in collaboration with the composer and multi-instrumentalist Weldon Irvine, in memory of Simone’s late friend Lorraine Hansberry – author of the play A Raisin in the Sun. She was admired by fellow creatives and activists, such as James Baldwin and Martin Luther King Jr., as one of the most insightful writers on the experience of African Americans in modern society, and became the godmother to Simone’s daughter Lisa. Simone is joined on stage by a chorus of singers, reinforcing the song’s message of communal uprising and the elevation of marginalised black talent. Her forthright introduction explains that “It is not addressed to white people – it does not put you down in any way, it simply ignores you… For my people need all the inspiration and love they can get.” Simone’s performance of the song ranks among her finest, reaching moments of ecstatic release which rival the joyous energy of a gospel choir, its inspirational message hammered home with an insatiable passion. Many decades later it remains a touchstone of soul, hip hop, R&B, and the entire post civil-rights diaspora.

Black Gold offers a brief snapshot of Simone performing at a definitive moment in her career, and is a testament to her undoubtedly deserving the title “High Priestess of Soul”. The magisterial elegance of her music, both formidable and beautiful, is heard not only in the proficiency of her playing but the rapturous reception she receives from the crowd in attendance on that early autumn evening. It’s a reminder that her talent was backed up by a singular personality – one that was in equal parts difficult, divisive, bold, and uncompromising. Black Gold offers us the privilege to hear this persona in all its unvarnished, raw and powerful glory, keeping the restless spirit of an incredible woman alive in the hearts of those she inspired.

The post The Story of Nina Simone ‘Black Gold’ appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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Unknown Dip Your Ears, No. 257 (Rattle’s Bavarian Lied von der Erde)


Gustav Mahler, Das Lied von der Erde
Simon Rattle/Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra/
Magdalena Kožená (mezzo), Stuart Skelton (tenor)
(BR Klassik)

There’s a reason to eye musical nepotism critically. Mediocrity rears its head when relatives – usually spouses – ride on the coattails of their more talented counterparts. Just think Garanča/Chichon, Netrebko/Eyvazov, or Zukerman/Forsyth.

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CAS Jazzie B on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol 1’ Video

Classic Album Sundays founder and BBC Radio 6 Music host Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy is joined by elbow’s Guy Garvey to take a look at their brand new album Giants of All Sizes in the Elgar Room at Royal Albert Hall. 

Lead singer and lyricist Guy Garvey describes the album as “an angry, old blue lament which finds its salvation in family, friends, the band and new life.” It is a record that lyrically takes in moments of deep personal loss whilst reflecting its times by confronting head-on the spectres of injustice and division not just in the UK but across the world. It is a record that could only have been made in the 21st Century.

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We were honoured to be joined by Jazzie B OBE at The British Library to look back on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol.1’ as part of National Album Day 2019.
Classic Album Sundays founder and BBC Radio 6 Music host Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy is joined by elbow’s Guy Garvey to take a look at their brand new album Giants of All Sizes in the Elgar Room at Royal Albert Hall. 

Lead singer and lyricist Guy Garvey describes the album as “an angry, old blue lament which finds its salvation in family, friends, the band and new life.” It is a record that lyrically takes in moments of deep personal loss whilst reflecting its times by confronting head-on the spectres of injustice and division not just in the UK but across the world. It is a record that could only have been made in the 21st Century.

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Jazzie B revolutionised black British music when he founded the band Soul II Soul. Their debut 1989 album became an international phenomenon; its blend of soul, reggae and funk landing perfectly amid the exploding house music culture of that year. The global musical landscape was changed forever.


Read more: Soul II Soul’s Jazzie B’s Top Five Albums
Listen: Jazzie B on ‘Revolutionary Soul and Ska’

The post Jazzie B on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol 1’ Video appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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CAS Jazzie B on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol 1’ Podcast

Classic Album Sundays founder and BBC Radio 6 Music host Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy is joined by elbow’s Guy Garvey to take a look at their brand new album Giants of All Sizes in the Elgar Room at Royal Albert Hall. 

Lead singer and lyricist Guy Garvey describes the album as “an angry, old blue lament which finds its salvation in family, friends, the band and new life.” It is a record that lyrically takes in moments of deep personal loss whilst reflecting its times by confronting head-on the spectres of injustice and division not just in the UK but across the world. It is a record that could only have been made in the 21st Century.

","author":"Classic Album Sundays","embedDisabled":false,"duration":4642.51,"recordedAtTs":1571069096}],"playlistURL":null,"shareTemplates":{"twitter":{"popup":{"popup":"twitter;width=550,height=420","name":"twitter"},"url":"https://twitter.com/share?lang=en&text=%3CCLIPTITLE%3E&url=%3CCLIPURL%3E%3Futm_campaign%3Ddetailpage%26utm_content%3Dretweet%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_source%3Dtwitter"},"facebook":{"popup":{"popup":"facebook;width=626,height=436","name":"facebook"},"url":"https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=%3CCLIPURL%3E%3Futm_campaign%3Ddetailpage%26utm_content%3Dretweet%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_source%3Dfacebook"},"google":{"popup":{"popup":"googleplus;width=480,height=420","name":"googleplus"},"url":"https://plus.google.com/share?url=%3CCLIPURL%3E%3Futm_campaign%3Ddetailpage%26utm_content%3Dretweet%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_source%3Dfacebook%26utm_campaign%3Ddetailpage%26utm_content%3Dretweet%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_source%3Dgoogleplus"}},"pageId":"detail_page_7395627"}”>

We were honoured to be joined by Jazzie B OBE at The British Library to look back on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol.1’ as part of National Album Day 2019.

Jazzie B revolutionised black British music when he founded the band Soul II Soul. Their debut 1989 album became an international phenomenon; its blend of soul, reggae and funk landing perfectly amid the exploding house music culture of that year. The global musical landscape was changed forever.


Read more: Soul II Soul’s Jazzie B’s Top Five Albums
Listen: Jazzie B on ‘Revolutionary Soul and Ska’

The post Jazzie B on Soul II Soul ‘Club Classics Vol 1’ Podcast appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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