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November 7, 2019

Dave Thompson Book Reviews – Radio Stars, Cold Chillin’ Records, Boston Counterculture

Good Personality: The Ultimate Guide to Radio Stars by Steve Wright (Steve Wright Books) Of all the bands thrust upwards by the British punk movement, few were raised as unexpectedly as Radio Stars.   Punk, after all, was all about …

The post Book Reviews – Radio Stars, Cold Chillin’ Records, Boston Counterculture appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Dave Thompson Book Reviews – Radio Stars, Cold Chillin’ Records, Boston Counterculture

Good Personality: The Ultimate Guide to Radio Stars by Steve Wright (Steve Wright Books) Of all the bands thrust upwards by the British punk movement, few were raised as unexpectedly as Radio Stars.   Punk, after all, was all about …

The post Book Reviews – Radio Stars, Cold Chillin’ Records, Boston Counterculture appeared first on Goldmine Magazine.

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Antonín Dvořák

Donald Macleod explores the life, music and perseverance of Antonín Dvořák.

Antonín Dvořák was no spring chicken when he found success as a composer. He was in his early thirties before he made his mark in his native Czech Republic, despite composing from a young age. Donald Macleod follows Dvořák as he attempts to win over successive audiences: from Prague to Vienna, England to America, before eventually returning to Prague and to the opera stage. Who did he need to impress in order to achieve the success he craved?

Donald Macleod introduces us to Dvořák as he struggles to carve his path as a composer. We’ll meet his influential friends who championed his work, including Brahms, the conductor Hans Richter and the virtuoso violinist Joseph Joachim. Dvořák’s ambition eventually took him to America, but as well as inspiring many of his best-known works, found him embroiled in arguments about the nature of American music and struggling with homesickness. Donald considers what drove Dvořák to tirelessly persevere, particularly with the operatic genre, when his other works were so well received by audiences at home and abroad.

Music featured:
Slavonic Dances, Op 46 (Dumka)
In Nature’s Realm, Op 91
Symphony No 3 in E flat major, Op 10
Písně Milostné, Op 83
Serenade, Op 44
Piano Trio in F minor, Op 65
Moravian Duets, Op 32 (How small the field of Slavíkov is & Water and Tears)
Symphonic Variations, Op 78
String Quartet No 10 in E flat major, Op 51
Violin Concerto in A minor, Op 53
Czech Suite, Op 39
Stabat Mater, Op 58
Svatá Ludmila, Op 71
Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88
Requiem, Op 89 (Hostias)
Piano Trio in E minor, Op 90 (Dumky)
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op 104
Violin Sonatina in G, Op 100
Biblical Songs, op 99
String Quartet No 12 in F major, Op 96 (American)
Symphony No 9, Op 95 (From the New World)
Vanda (Overture)
The King and the Charcoal Burner (Act 11, scene 7)
Dimitrij (Act 4, scene 3)
The Noon Witch, Op 196
Rusalka (Act 3)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Cerian Arianrhod for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Antonín Dvořák https://ift.tt/2ClwfDg

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

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With my longtime friend John Varvatos at his CBGB store for the…

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Mark Kimber Songbyrd Radio Episode 80: Classic Albums By Women featuring Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy

Classic Album Sundays founder Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy joined our D.C. host Joe Lapan on his most recent episode of Songbyrd Radio to discuss our very first book, Classic Albums By Women. If you missed the broadcast you can stream the full show below.


Read: Preview: Classic Albums By Women

 

The post Songbyrd Radio Episode 80: Classic Albums By Women featuring Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy appeared first on Classic Album Sundays.

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December issue on sale now!

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Kirsten Stoller Discogs Database Guidelines Now Available in Spanish

For the first time ever, the full Discogs Database Guidelines are available in Spanish!

The Discogs Database Submission Guidelines are the backbone of Discogs; the product of almost 20 years of community-driven discussion about the best way to catalog all of the music in the world.  The Database Guidelines include over 30,000 words detailing precisely how music data should be documented on Discogs. 

With over 11.5 million releases cataloged and more than 6 million artists documented on the Discogs database, our international discography continues to grow. Discogs hopes the Database Guidelines translations will better support our international community, and further aide the Discogs’ vision of building the biggest and most comprehensive music database in the world.

No one is more familiar with the lingo and complexity of music cataloging quite like Discogs database contributors. Translations for the Discogs Database Guidelines are 100% crowdsourced from the Discogs contributor community. Over a dozen Spanish contributors helped with the Database Guidelines translation.  A special thank you to Jevo, macaumetal, Martin_H_Unzonwaxsessions, mcymd, and Sergio_Reyes who each contributed a significant amount of time toward this translation effort.

List of top Spanish translators

The Discogs Community Translation Team is currently working to complete German translations, along with continuing to improve French and Spanish translations. If you have feedback about any Discogs translations, please let us know in the Discogs Internationalization (i18n) GroupDiscogs Community Members interested in getting involved with the translation effort can join the Discogs Community Translation Team

The post Discogs Database Guidelines Now Available in Spanish appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Music Freelance An introduction to Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 15

Rating: 
0

Symphony No. 15 Op. 141 (1971)

Premiered: Moscow 1972

Shostakovich wrote his final symphony while planning an opera on Chekhov’s ‘The Black Monk’, which concerns a man who surrenders to delusions of grandeur. Was this a memorial to the hubristic delusions of the Soviet Empire? Though it evokes a childhood world, it’s a nursery twitching with sinister puppets.

VASILY PETRENKO: ‘The final symphony is so fascinating, so controversial. I’ve known musicologists who were close to him in his last years, and say he was actually very optimistic. He’d gone through a great fear of death and come out the other side. Most of the symphony was dreamed up in hospital, and written down at home. It’s a little like Prokofiev’s Seventh Symphony, about childhood; he said it was a “toy shop”, but what a macabre one!

We hear hospital equipment, electric shock treatment, vulgarity and satire; he brings in serialism, a vast array of quotations – everything from Rossini’s William Tell to Mahler’s Fourth Symphony – which come across like the crazy voices in your head when you are delirious.

And then comes the music from Götterdammerung: in Russian the title is translated as “Death of the Gods”, not “Twilight of the Gods”, and it could also be translated as “Condemnation of the Gods”. What did he mean? He left us no clues, but wrote to his friend Isaak Glikman: “I don’t myself quite know why the quotations are there, but I could not, could not, not include them.”

‘I feel he is recording a half-conscious state. The web of quotes from his own pieces is complex; they are reversed and converted, and he keeps coming back to his Symphony No. 4. Near the end we sense the world rippling and dissolving – there’s an understanding that it’s time to go. In the twitching ending are we hearing the death of all illusions?’

 

 

Vasily Petrenko is, like Shostakovich, a son of Leningrad/St Petersburg, and grew up singing the composer’s songs in its Capella Boys Music School.

In 1997 he won first prize in the Shostakovich Choral Conducting Competition and was made chief conductor of the St Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra, during which time he took on the principal conductorship of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic.

On his arrival in the city in 2006, at just 30, he launched a project with Naxos to record all Shostakovich’s 15 symphonies. The series has drawn international acclaim and, as the final instalment is released, he looks back on his nine-year journey.

‘To work with an orchestra on one composer for so many years has meant we could build a style, an approach to his language,’ he says. ‘At first, it felt like an exhilarating challenge: there are huge demands. Now, we are of one mind.’ 

 

 

Petrenko, born a year after the composer’s death, grew up in the Soviet Union. A beneficiary of its uniquely rigorous teaching system, he witnessed its dissolution when he was 15, the re-writing of history books, and even the emergence of a nostalgia for that dark era. He’s in touch with those who remember Shostakovich, and the times through which he lived, but has experienced the Western view of this controversial figure.

‘When I conduct these symphonies in Russia, there’s still an unspoken understanding of the songs, the messages. We talk more about the composer’s personal life. When I conduct in the West, it’s important to give the historical context. There’s still so much we don’t know; the family destroyed many letters when Shostakovich died. The State would probably have requisitioned them anyway.’ 

 

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Music Freelance An introduction to Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 15

Rating: 
0

Symphony No. 15 Op. 141 (1971)

Premiered: Moscow 1972

Shostakovich wrote his final symphony while planning an opera on Chekhov’s ‘The Black Monk’, which concerns a man who surrenders to delusions of grandeur. Was this a memorial to the hubristic delusions of the Soviet Empire? Though it evokes a childhood world, it’s a nursery twitching with sinister puppets.

VASILY PETRENKO: ‘The final symphony is so fascinating, so controversial. I’ve known musicologists who were close to him in his last years, and say he was actually very optimistic. He’d gone through a great fear of death and come out the other side. Most of the symphony was dreamed up in hospital, and written down at home. It’s a little like Prokofiev’s Seventh Symphony, about childhood; he said it was a “toy shop”, but what a macabre one!

We hear hospital equipment, electric shock treatment, vulgarity and satire; he brings in serialism, a vast array of quotations – everything from Rossini’s William Tell to Mahler’s Fourth Symphony – which come across like the crazy voices in your head when you are delirious.

And then comes the music from Götterdammerung: in Russian the title is translated as “Death of the Gods”, not “Twilight of the Gods”, and it could also be translated as “Condemnation of the Gods”. What did he mean? He left us no clues, but wrote to his friend Isaak Glikman: “I don’t myself quite know why the quotations are there, but I could not, could not, not include them.”

‘I feel he is recording a half-conscious state. The web of quotes from his own pieces is complex; they are reversed and converted, and he keeps coming back to his Symphony No. 4. Near the end we sense the world rippling and dissolving – there’s an understanding that it’s time to go. In the twitching ending are we hearing the death of all illusions?’

 

 

Vasily Petrenko is, like Shostakovich, a son of Leningrad/St Petersburg, and grew up singing the composer’s songs in its Capella Boys Music School.

In 1997 he won first prize in the Shostakovich Choral Conducting Competition and was made chief conductor of the St Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra, during which time he took on the principal conductorship of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic.

On his arrival in the city in 2006, at just 30, he launched a project with Naxos to record all Shostakovich’s 15 symphonies. The series has drawn international acclaim and, as the final instalment is released, he looks back on his nine-year journey.

‘To work with an orchestra on one composer for so many years has meant we could build a style, an approach to his language,’ he says. ‘At first, it felt like an exhilarating challenge: there are huge demands. Now, we are of one mind.’ 

 

 

Petrenko, born a year after the composer’s death, grew up in the Soviet Union. A beneficiary of its uniquely rigorous teaching system, he witnessed its dissolution when he was 15, the re-writing of history books, and even the emergence of a nostalgia for that dark era. He’s in touch with those who remember Shostakovich, and the times through which he lived, but has experienced the Western view of this controversial figure.

‘When I conduct these symphonies in Russia, there’s still an unspoken understanding of the songs, the messages. We talk more about the composer’s personal life. When I conduct in the West, it’s important to give the historical context. There’s still so much we don’t know; the family destroyed many letters when Shostakovich died. The State would probably have requisitioned them anyway.’ 

 

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