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Date

June 18, 2020

BoSound An Interview with Fumimasa of Japan’s Deadstock Records

I’ve seen more people from overseas travel to Japan to buy records in the last few years (maybe many as half of the customers have been non-locals at record shops in Tokyo pre-COVID-19). You may then be wondering why people travel to this small island country just for records?

One of the reasons might be that Japan has many unique and rich music styles such as city pop and jazz, which have been pretty popular across the world as well as in the Discogs marketplace for a while. But there’s another big reason. Japanese record stores and sellers have a reputation for strict grading and professionalism that is recognized globally.

In this post, we’d like to introduce one of our great Discogs sellers from Japan: Fumimasa from Deadstock Records.

Our Crate Minds series showcases some of the best sellers on Discogs. You’ll meet the people behind the crates (virtual and otherwise), get some insights into the life of a record seller, and learn tips on selling records from the best in the biz.

Discogs: Tell us who you are and how long you have been a Discogs user.

Fumimasa: My name is Fumimasa and I am the owner of Deadstock Records. I have lived in Tokyo for around 20 years. As you may know, Tokyo is one of the biggest cities for record stores in the world. When I moved to Shibuya, the area was the center of record stores in Tokyo back in 2000, and I was digging records every day and night. At that time, there were about 60 record stores in the small area, and I often saw many young people walking with a plastic bag from various record stores there.

Anyway, I collected many kinds of records in hip-hop, jazz, heavy metal, techno, house, noise, ambient, and so on. I bought more than 100 copies of vinyl records every month in those days.

I’ve been selling on Discogs for around nine years. I’ve sold a lot of my records on Discogs and appreciate it a lot!

D: How did you get into selling records?

F: I collected around 5,000 copies of vinyl and CDs for three or four years starting in 2000. Eventually, my room couldn’t hold any more records. Then, I sold a few records to some record stores … I didn’t have much money at that time too, actually. For a while, I brought some vinyl to various record shops and got some money. That was the start of my selling experience. One day, I started listing records and CDs on a Japanese auction in 2004. Gradually, I was running out of my records for sale, so I traveled to the United Kingdom to purchase vinyl records in 2005. It was quite fun but made a huge deficit as well … At that time, I didn’t know how I could make profits from records because I had no professional experiences selling vinyl. But, I have learned it by trial and error since then.

D: What is your favorite record store and why?

F: Disk Union! I have visited the store since I was 17. I don’t think that there are any shops that can compete with their quality and quantity. Whenever I go there, there is something I’d like to buy.

D: Do you have a story that you’d like to share about record-selling? Please tell us!

F: I have a foreign customer on Discogs and got to know him through his orders. After several orders, when he visited Japan, I had an opportunity to meet him. At the meeting, he purchased some of my recommended items. Now, we are good friends and are working on a secret project!

D: Do you have a favorite record of all-time?

F: It must be something from Electric Wizard’s LPs like Witchcult Today, Black Masses, and Time to Die. They are the ultimate rock band for me. No rock bands could be cooler and heavier than them!



D: What is the most valuable item you’ve ever sold?

F: I think that it should be Angus MacLise ‘s Trance and was sold out in 30 seconds after I listed! It was really quick, haha.

D: What does your personal collection look like?

F: Actually, I don’t really have many records and CDs in my collection now. I already sold many of my personal collection and it should be under 100 copies in it now. Other than Electric Wizard LPs, I still keep Porter Ricks’ Symbiotics, Steve Vai’s Flex-Able, Simon Baker’s Too Slow, Allenko Brotherhood Ensemble’s  Dance Of Loa, etc. These records are what I’d like to listen to eternally.

D: What has been your best record find?

Keiji Haino – Watashi Dake? (1981)

F: I think this is the most amazing record from Japan. This record made me get into Japanese underground music.

D: What is your number one tip for buyers and/or sellers on Discogs?

F: Sellers need to grade conditions carefully. When I started listing on Discogs, some customers told me that my grading wasn’t accurate. Sellers should differentiate each condition clearly: NM, VG+, VG, G, and so on.

If your customers complain about your grading, unfortunately, you should be honest and responsible … Possible solutions could be sending another, cleaner record or providing compensation to them. I have tried to cope with such a problem honestly.

D: Our favorite pickup from Deadstock Records:

If you enjoyed this interview and feel like it’s time to buy some records, you can check Fumimasa’s shop here.
––––

The post An Interview with Fumimasa of Japan’s Deadstock Records appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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via IFTTT

BoSound An Interview with Fumimasa of Japan’s Deadstock Records

I’ve seen more people from overseas travel to Japan to buy records in the last few years (maybe many as half of the customers have been non-locals at record shops in Tokyo pre-COVID-19). You may then be wondering why people travel to this small island country just for records?

One of the reasons might be that Japan has many unique and rich music styles such as city pop and jazz, which have been pretty popular across the world as well as in the Discogs marketplace for a while. But there’s another big reason. Japanese record stores and sellers have a reputation for strict grading and professionalism that is recognized globally.

In this post, we’d like to introduce one of our great Discogs sellers from Japan: Fumimasa from Deadstock Records.

Our Crate Minds series showcases some of the best sellers on Discogs. You’ll meet the people behind the crates (virtual and otherwise), get some insights into the life of a record seller, and learn tips on selling records from the best in the biz.

Discogs: Tell us who you are and how long you have been a Discogs user.

Fumimasa: My name is Fumimasa and I am the owner of Deadstock Records. I have lived in Tokyo for around 20 years. As you may know, Tokyo is one of the biggest cities for record stores in the world. When I moved to Shibuya, the area was the center of record stores in Tokyo back in 2000, and I was digging records every day and night. At that time, there were about 60 record stores in the small area, and I often saw many young people walking with a plastic bag from various record stores there.

Anyway, I collected many kinds of records in hip-hop, jazz, heavy metal, techno, house, noise, ambient, and so on. I bought more than 100 copies of vinyl records every month in those days.

I’ve been selling on Discogs for around nine years. I’ve sold a lot of my records on Discogs and appreciate it a lot!

D: How did you get into selling records?

F: I collected around 5,000 copies of vinyl and CDs for three or four years starting in 2000. Eventually, my room couldn’t hold any more records. Then, I sold a few records to some record stores … I didn’t have much money at that time too, actually. For a while, I brought some vinyl to various record shops and got some money. That was the start of my selling experience. One day, I started listing records and CDs on a Japanese auction in 2004. Gradually, I was running out of my records for sale, so I traveled to the United Kingdom to purchase vinyl records in 2005. It was quite fun but made a huge deficit as well … At that time, I didn’t know how I could make profits from records because I had no professional experiences selling vinyl. But, I have learned it by trial and error since then.

D: What is your favorite record store and why?

F: Disk Union! I have visited the store since I was 17. I don’t think that there are any shops that can compete with their quality and quantity. Whenever I go there, there is something I’d like to buy.

D: Do you have a story that you’d like to share about record-selling? Please tell us!

F: I have a foreign customer on Discogs and got to know him through his orders. After several orders, when he visited Japan, I had an opportunity to meet him. At the meeting, he purchased some of my recommended items. Now, we are good friends and are working on a secret project!

D: Do you have a favorite record of all-time?

F: It must be something from Electric Wizard’s LPs like Witchcult Today, Black Masses, and Time to Die. They are the ultimate rock band for me. No rock bands could be cooler and heavier than them!



D: What is the most valuable item you’ve ever sold?

F: I think that it should be Angus MacLise ‘s Trance and was sold out in 30 seconds after I listed! It was really quick, haha.

D: What does your personal collection look like?

F: Actually, I don’t really have many records and CDs in my collection now. I already sold many of my personal collection and it should be under 100 copies in it now. Other than Electric Wizard LPs, I still keep Porter Ricks’ Symbiotics, Steve Vai’s Flex-Able, Simon Baker’s Too Slow, Allenko Brotherhood Ensemble’s  Dance Of Loa, etc. These records are what I’d like to listen to eternally.

D: What has been your best record find?

Keiji Haino – Watashi Dake? (1981)

F: I think this is the most amazing record from Japan. This record made me get into Japanese underground music.

D: What is your number one tip for buyers and/or sellers on Discogs?

F: Sellers need to grade conditions carefully. When I started listing on Discogs, some customers told me that my grading wasn’t accurate. Sellers should differentiate each condition clearly: NM, VG+, VG, G, and so on.

If your customers complain about your grading, unfortunately, you should be honest and responsible … Possible solutions could be sending another, cleaner record or providing compensation to them. I have tried to cope with such a problem honestly.

D: Our favorite pickup from Deadstock Records:

If you enjoyed this interview and feel like it’s time to buy some records, you can check Fumimasa’s shop here.
––––

The post An Interview with Fumimasa of Japan’s Deadstock Records appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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via IFTTT

Nicole Raney The Discogs Top 50 Best-Selling Records of April 2020

What are folks buying on Discogs?

Nujabes’ Modal Soul was No. 1 in March but got beat out by The Strokes’ new album in April. Other recent releases in the best-selling records of April 2020 include Dua Lipa’s Future Nostalgia, The Chats’ High Risk Behaviour, Andrew Weatherall’s Pamela #1, Waxahatchee’s Saint Cloud, Thundercat’s It Is What It Is, and the new(ish) Slow Rush from Tame Impala, which has been on the Discogs’ top-selling list since its release in February.

Unfortunately, we lost two amazing artists at the beginning of 2020 — Bill Withers on March 30 and John Prine on April 7 — which might explain the increase in sales of Prine’s Tree of Forgiveness, his final studio album, and Withers’ Just As I Am, Still Bill, and Live At Carnegie Hall reissues.

We also saw a spike in more classics, from David Bowie to The Smiths. And once again, Tracy Chapman’s self-titled album (who has been hanging out on this list for a while) makes an appearance at No. 46.

What are we listening to? After seeing its reissue in the Top 50, we dove into Buena Vista Social Club’s debut album, which helped popularize traditional Cuban music when it was first released in 1997.

Let us know what you’re spinning.


Portishead - Dummy album cover

#16. Portishead – Dummy

LP, Album, RE, 180

Unknown Artist - MYEDITS001 album cover

#20. Unknown Artist – MYEDITS001

12″, S/Sided, Ltd, W/Lbl

Tame Impala - The Slow Rush album cover

#21. Tame Impala – The Slow Rush

LP, Red + LP, Blu + Album, Ltd, 180

Frank Ocean - channel ORANGE album cover

#23. Frank Ocean – channel ORANGE

2xLP, Album, Promo, Unofficial, Ora

Amy Winehouse - The Collection album cover

#26. Amy Winehouse – The Collection

Box, Comp, Dlx, Ltd, Num + 2xLP, Album, RE, Gat +

Frank Ocean - Blond album cover

#27. Frank Ocean – Blond

2xLP, Album, Promo, Unofficial, Cle

Bill Withers - Still Bill album cover

#28. Bill Withers – Still Bill

LP, Album, RE, RM, 180

Alice In Chains - Dirt album cover

#30. Alice In Chains – Dirt

LP, Album, RE, RM, 180

Knxwledge - 1988 album cover

#43. Knxwledge – 1988

LP, Album, W/Lbl

Nirvana - Nevermind album cover

#47. Nirvana – Nevermind

LP, Album, RE, 180

Joy Division - Unknown Pleasures album cover

#50. Joy Division – Unknown Pleasures

LP, Album, Ltd, RE, RP, Red
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What a fun time we had that day!! Throwback to some behind the scenes footage from my shoot with…

via The Real Mick Rock https://ift.tt/3fBbdCh

What a fun time we had that day!! Throwback to some behind the scenes footage from my shoot with…

via The Real Mick Rock https://ift.tt/3fBbdCh

What a fun time we had that day!! Throwback to some behind the scenes footage from my shoot with…

via The Real Mick Rock https://ift.tt/3fBbdCh

Missing sounds of New York. By Alan Licht

via The Wire: Home https://ift.tt/2Nca08t

Morgan Enos Neil Young’s Long-Lost Homegrown Is His Most Empathetic Breakup Album

Neil Young began writing songs from a me-first perspective and has spent his long career growing out of it. His first Buffalo Springfield track as a 21-year-old began with the disgruntled complaint “Hey, who’s that stomping all over my face?” Meanwhile, the closing track on Young’s 2019 album Colorado is a two-way street: “I know you ask all the same questions I do.” Somewhere in between, in the ashes of a blown-up relationship on an album that would be shelved for 45 years, he sang a line that rang true: “You lose your love when you say the word mine.”

As a lone-wolf type with a documentarian streak, Young has sometimes been mired in mine. His most impactful songs of the 1970s were oftentimes his most self-absorbed. “I’m a pauper in a naked disguise / A millionaire through a businessman’s eyes,” he proclaimed on 1973’s “Don’t Be Denied.” “I need a crowd of people but I can’t face them day-to-day,” he admitted on 1974’s “On The Beach.” What was going on back then? His relationship with Carrie Snodgress, a Hollywood actress and the mother of his first child, Zeke Young, was falling apart.

While in the eye of the storm, Young made deeply personal music that hasn’t been fully heard until now. Today (June 19), he belatedly released Homegrown, which was recorded in Nashville and Los Angeles in 1974 and 1975 before being abandoned and disassembled for other releases. (Some of its songs appeared in different forms on 1977’s American Stars ‘n Bars, and Decade, and 1980’s Hawks & Doves.)

“They’re a little too real,” Young told Cameron Crowe and Rolling Stone at the time. “I think I’d be too embarrassed to put them out.” When long-time fans commune with unheard gems like “Separate Ways,” “Try” and “Kansas,” they’ll be glad he did.

Back then, it was a tie as to whether Young would release Homegrown or Tonight’s the Night, a tottering wake for his deceased colleagues Danny Whitten and Bruce Berry. So he put each album on one side of a reel of tape and played them back-to-back for a few besotted buddies, including members of the Band. “It was late at night,” Young remembered in Jimmy McDonough’s 2002 biography Shakey. “We were all pretty f—ed up, listenin’ to tapes, on the edge.”

When Tonight’s The Night came on, “[Rick Danko] freaked,” Crazy Horse drummer Ralph Molina said in the book. “He said, ‘If you guys don’t release the f—in’ album, you’re crazy.’” And that’s what happened: Tonight’s The Night was released in 1975 to critical acclaim yet consternation from Young’s manager Elliot Roberts and label Warner Bros. Until 2020, Homegrown has mostly existed in fans’ imaginations along with fellow unreleased Young albums that have been discussed in hushed tones for years like Chrome Dreams, Toast, and Oceanside-Countryside.

Beyond the “what-if” factor surrounding its release, Homegrown contains a lot of insight into Young’s emotional state. Take “Separate Ways,” which is in a similar lane as 1974’s “Motion Pictures (For Carrie)” but with a subtle difference. In that song, the “you” doesn’t appear until the end. (That song was written “before I knew — when I could sense,” Young explained in Shakey.) But in “Separate Ways,” Snodgress is an equal participant. “The light shone from your eyes,” Young sings at the top, devastatingly adding “It isn’t gone / It will soon come back again.”

“Try,” which follows, is surprisingly conciliatory, especially in comparison with later put-downs like “Stupid Girl” from 1975’s Zuma. With guest vocalist Emmylou Harris abetting him, along with pedal steel player Ben Keith, bassist Tim Drummond, and drummer Levon Helm, Young sings of wanting to right the ship. He even works in a private reference to Snodgress’s troubled mother, Carolyn, who regularly feigned suicide for attention and had recently passed away due to complications from alcoholism.

“She had this saying when she had a couple of drinks — ‘Shit, Mary, I can’t dance,’” Snodgress remembered in Shakey. During the wake at Carolyn’s favorite Chicago watering hole, Young scrawled the phrase into the back of her funeral book; later, he worked it into “Try” as a miniature tribute to her late mother. (“It was such an appropriate elegy,” Snogress reflected.)

The pindrop acoustic ballad “Kansas” also addresses Snodgress directly. “I feel like I just woke up from a bad dream / And it’s so good to have you sleeping by my side,” he sings as if stepping into a clearing from the chaos: “We can go gliding through the air / Far from the jeers and lies.” Once again, Young doesn’t sound embittered or lashing out; he sounds sweet and reciprocal. As on “Try,” the perturbing details of their breakup — as laid out in Shakey — didn’t seem to make it into the lyrics.

Not all of Homegrown is ripped straight from real-life drama. The title track, which has been floating around for decades, is a lighthearted love song to cannabis; “Florida” is a dosed-sounding monologue backed by a rubbed wine glass; and “We Don’t Smoke It No More” is an extemporaneous-sounding 12-bar blues that breaks the tension. A handful of outtakes from its sessions, like “Homefires,” “Barefoot Floors,” and “Love/Art Blues,” remain unheard outside of covers and live recordings.

Regardless, the 12 songs that did make it onto Homegrown paint a slightly different picture than is established about this period in Young’s life. For all the bad vibes surrounding this doomed relationship, these songs (the scathing “Vacancy” aside) show that he didn’t always process it negatively or cynically. “The way Zeke turned out, Carrie must’ve done a lot of stuff right,” Young pointed out in Shakey despite all the “hell” his son had to endure due to their discord. “She must’ve, because the fact is, he turned out pretty f—in’ good.”

Later on, Young released 1978’s Comes A Time, 1992’s Harvest Moon, 2000’s Silver & Gold, and 2005’s Prairie Wind, all richly sentimental albums about the passage of time and the preciousness of family bonds. And now we know that Homegrown, the lost link between all four, was where that door to Young’s heart was opened.



Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
Don’t miss a beat!
Subscribe to Discogs Newsletters for music news, contests, exclusive vinyl & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account.
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