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Composer of the Week

Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

Donald Macleod surveys one of the most famed Spanish composers of the Renaissance, Tomás Luis de Victoria.

Tomás Luis de Victoria has become the most famed Spanish composer of the Renaissance and ranks alongside Palestrina and Lassus as one of the greatest composers of the 16th century. He was a singer, organist, scholar, teacher, and a priest but it was in composition that he made his most significant impact. His motets, Offices for the Dead and music for Holy Week are admired for their great beauty and intensity and his musical talent thrust him into the orbit of Spain’s royal family and the most senior clerics in Rome. His devotion to God sat at the heart of his creative life; and he wrote, “there is not a single thing as useful as music, which, reaching our hearts soft but deeply, provides a clear benefit not only for our soul but also for our body.”

Music Featured:

O magnum mysterium
Ave Maria
Missa pro defunctis (Taedet animan meam)
Missa pro defunctis (excerpt)
Missa pro defunctis (excerpt)
Magnificat octavi toni
O Magnum Mysterium
Vadam et circuibo civitatem a 6
Ascendens Christus in altum
Super flumina Babylonis
Missa O magnum mysterium
Ave maris stella a 4
Gaude Maria
Nigra sum sed formosa
Ardens Est Cor Muem
Magnificat septimi toni
Lamentations for Maundy Thursday
Conditor alme siderum a 4
Aurea luce a 4
O Ildephonse
Pange Lingua ‘more hispano’ a 4
Victimae paschali Laudes a 8
Veni, Sancte Spiritus a 8
Missa pro Victoria a 9
Missa Surge Propera a 5 (Credo)
O quam gloriosum
O vos omnes
Missa pro defunctis (excerpt)
Versa est in luctum
Libera me (Absolution)
Missa Salve regina a 8
Alma Redemptoris Mater

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Luke Whitlock

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611) https://ift.tt/TsR6uA9

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Dvořák and America

Donald Macleod explores Dvořák’s American years and uncovers what he achieved during his time there.

Antonín Dvořák became the first Czech composer to achieve global fame. His gift for transforming the folk styles of his native Bohemia into richly Romantic classical music won him admirers far beyond his homeland. Consequently, Dvořák was approached to leave Europe and serve as director of the newly established National Conservatory of Music in America. His sponsors hoped he would help foster a new and distinctive American musical style, less reliant upon Germanic traditions. During his time in America, from 1892 – 1895, Dvořák composed many of his most celebrated works, including his 9th symphony and his cello concerto. Before leaving, he’d started work on his Cello Concerto, inspired by his yearning for the Bohemian countryside. Back at home, Dvořák also completed his String Quartet No 13 which some have seen to be his final work to have musical associations with America.

Dvořák’s had set out to encourage American musicians to look to their own traditions rather than simply following behind Europe. He may not have been entirely successful but he did encourage others in that aim, such as Harry T. Burleigh. Burleigh said of Dvořák that he’d assisted in changing attitudes of African American’s towards their own folk tradition, and most importantly, that Dvořák “was a man of the people”.

Music Featured:

Symphony No 9 in E minor, Op 95 “From the New World” (excerpt)
Piano Trio No 4 in E minor, Op 90 “Dumky” (Lento maestoso)
Carnival Overture, Op 92
Requiem, Op 89 (Introitus)
Symphony No 4 in D minor, Op 13 (excerpt)
Silent Woods, Op 68 No 5
Symphony No 8 in G, Op 88 (excerpt)
Requiem, Op 89 (Confutatis Maledictis)
Symphony No 6 in D, Op 60 (Scherzo: Furiant)
Symphony No 8 in G, Op 88 (Allegretto grazioso – Molto vivace)
Te Deum, Op 102
Southland Sketches (excerpt) – Harry T. Burleigh
Symphony No 9 in E minor, Op 95 “From the New World” (excerpt)
Sonatina for violin and piano, Op 100 (Larghetto)
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot – Arr. Harry T. Burleigh
Go Down Moses – Arr. Harry T. Burleigh
Symphony No 9 in E minor, Op 95 “From the New World” (Largo)
String Quintet, Op 97 “American” (excerpt)
Symphony No 9 in E minor, Op 95 “From the New World” (Allegro con fuoco)
Humoresques, Op 101 No.7 (excerpt)
Suite in A, Op 98B (Allegro)
String Quartet No 12 in F, Op 96 “The American” (Vivace)
Humoresques, Op 101 (excerpt)
Biblical Songs, Op 99 (excerpt)
Among the Fuchsias, from Five Songs of Laurence Hope – Harry T. Burleigh
Worth While, from Five Songs of Laurence Hope – Harry T. Burleigh
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op 104 (excerpt)
Lullaby, B194 – Dvořák Arr. J. Suk
String Quartet No 14, Op 105 (Molto vivace)
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op 104 (Adagio ma non troppo)
String Quartet No 13 in G, Op 106 (excerpt)
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op 104 (Finale)

Presented by Donald Macleod

Produced by Luke Whitlock

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Dvořák and America https://ift.tt/60hFRe5

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/WEc0hpq

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Handel and the Crown

Donald Macleod explores Handel’s crucial relationship with the British monarchy, and how he and the Georgian Kings helped forge a new sense of British culture and identity.

What could be more quintessentially British than a rousing chorus of Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus? Or his anthem Zadok the Priest, which has been performed at every British coronation since 1727? Yet, though the composer became was a naturalised British subject, he was born in Germany and kept his German accent all of his life. The same was true of the two Kings Handel served, George I and George II. This week, as we head towards a royal jubilee weekend, Donald Macleod explores Handel’s crucial relationship with the British monarchy, and how he and the Georgian Kings helped forge a new sense of British culture and identity.

Music Featured:

Messiah: Hallelujah Chorus
Agrippina, Act 2: “Pensieri, voi mi tormentate”
Handel: Concerto Grosso in B flat, Op 3 No 1
Rinaldo, Act 1: “Cara Sposa”
‘Utrecht’ Jubilate
Te Deum in D, ‘Queen Caroline’ (Mvts 1 & 2)
Water Music (excerpt)
Radamisto, Act 2: “Ombra caro di mia sposa”
I will magnify thee
Overture to Admeto
Riccardo primo, re d’Inghilterra, Act 2 ‘T’amo si’
My Heart is Inditing
Ariodante Act III: ‘Dopo Notte’ and Finale
Zadok the Priest
Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline: I. Introduction, II. The Ways of Zion do Morn
Messiah: ‘Every valley shall be exalted’ and No 4 ‘And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed’
Israel in Egypt: (extracts from Parts II and III)
Concerto Grosso No 12 in B minor
‘Dettingen’ Te Deum: ‘Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day’
Occasional Oratorio: Overture
Handel Organ Concerto Op 4 No 1: II. Allegro
Judas Maccabaeus, Part 2: ‘See! The Conquering Hero Comes’, ‘Sing Unto God’ and ‘O Lovely Peace’
Music for the Royal Fireworks
Messiah: Hallelujah Chorus

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Chris Taylor

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Handel and the Crown https://ift.tt/gQjkJ28

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/iwMjXtm

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Vaughan Williams Today 4/4

This month, Donald Macleod takes a new look at one of Britain’s best loved composers, Ralph Vaughan Williams, as part of Radio 3’s ‘Vaughan Williams Today’ season – marking the 150th anniversary of the composer’s birth. Over the course of four weeks and twenty programmes, Donald will be delving into Vaughan Williams’ life story and work in intriguing detail, and he’ll also be talking to some of the leading authorities on Vaughan Williams to share and explore fresh perspectives on a variety of overlooked and less well known aspects of his life and work, forming a comprehensive and absorbing portrait of a composer whose body of work has had such an enduring impact on British cultural life.

In this, the final week of Composer of the Week’s landmark series, Donald will focus primarily on the years 1948-1958, the final decade of Vaughan Williams’ life. The composer was, by this point recognised as the Grand Old Man of English music, and for a younger generation of British composers had begun to represent the establishment. He was also beginning to feel his age, but was still managing to surprise critics with some of his new works, and he showed little sign of slowing down, continuing to lead a busy life, and launching into new endeavours too: foreign travels which included a major tour of the US, a major house move, and, following the death of Adeline, a second marriage. Donald will also be speaking to Vaughan Williams experts Ceri Owen and Alain Frogley about Adeline Fisher and Ursula Wood, Vaughan Williams two wives, and about Vaughan Williams’ legacy, and the changing reception to his music since his death.

Music Featured:

Symphony no. 6 in E minor – I. Allegro
Prayer to the Father of Heaven
An Oxford Elegy (excerpt)
Concerto Grosso for strings
Pilgrim’s Progress – House Beautiful
Sons of Light – III. The Messengers of Speech
Four Last Songs
3 Impressions – II. The Solent
Songs of Travel
Three Shakespeare Songs
Romance in D flat for harmonica & strings
Old Hundredth
Silence and Music
Symphony 7 ‘Sinfonia Antartica’ – III. Landscape – Lento
Turtle dove; Dark-Eyed Sailor; John Dory
Symphony no 8 in D minor – II. Scherzo alla marcia; III. Cavatina
Vision of Aeroplanes
Symphony no. 9 in E minor – IV. Andante tranquillo
Prelude on Three Welsh Hymn Tunes
Symphony no. 9 – II. Andante Sostenuto
The Lover’s Ghost
Suite from 49th Parallel (excerpt)
Nocturne: Whispers of Heavenly Death
A London Symphony (1913 version) – IV. Finale (excerpt)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Producer Sam Phillips

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page https://ift.tt/EjvhClT

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/1PDLNcW

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Vaughan Williams Today 3/4

This month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at one of Britain’s most popular composers, Ralph Vaughan Williams, as part of Radio 3’s ‘Vaughan Williams Today’ season – marking the 150th anniversary of the composer’s birth.
Alongside programmes which delve into Vaughan Williams’ life story and music in fascinating depth, over the course of four weeks and twenty programmes, Donald will also be talking to some of the leading authorities on Vaughan Williams to share and explore share new perspectives on a variety of overlooked and less well known aspects his life and work, forming a comprehensive and absorbing portrait of a composer whose body of work has had such an enduring imprint on British cultural life.

In the third week of this landmark series, Donald focuses on the years 1931-1947, a dramatic period in not just Vaughan Williams’ life, but in the wider world too, encompassing the second World War. Vaughan Williams was 67 when Britain and France declared war on the Reich, so too old for active service, but he threw himself into contributing wherever he could to the war effort. Musically, this was another period when the composer suffered from a crisis of failing inspiration and creative drought as the political turmoil deepened around him, but it would also give rise to some of his finest music, including three of his best regarded Symphonies – numbers 4, 5 and 6.

Music Featured:

Into the Woods my Master Went
Fantasia on Greensleeves
Piano Concerto in C major – I. Toccata; II. Romanza
Symphony no. 4 in F minor – III. Scherzo; IV. Finale con epilogo fugato
The Running Set
5 Tudor Portraits – V. Jolly Rutterkin
Two Hymn-Tune Preludes
Festival Te Deum in F
Riders to the sea – Act I: “…and may he have mercy on my soul”
Serenade to Music (Orchestral Version)
Epithalamion – The Lover’s Song
Epithamalion – Song of the Winged Love
Bushes and Briars
Symphony no. 5 in D major – IV. Passacaglia
Dona Nobis Pacem – I. Agnus Dei, II. Beat! Beat! Drums!, III. Reconciliation
Coastal Command Suite – Finale
5 variants of Dives and Lazarus
49th Parallel – The Invaders
Partita for Double String Orchestra – IV. Fantasia
Concerto for Oboe and Strings in A minor – III. Finale
Symphony No 3, ‘Pastoral Symphony’ (excerpt)
Song of Thanksgiving (excerpt)
Symphony No.6 in E minor – II. Moderato; III. Scherzo
Symphony no. 2 “A London Symphony” – IV. Andante con moto (excerpt)
Symphony no. 7 “Sinfonia Antartica” – V. Epilogue (excerpt)
Symphony no.1 “A Sea Symphony” – I. A Song for all Sea, all Ships (excerpt)
Symphony no 9 in E minor – IV. Andante tranquillo – poco animato (excerpt)
Symphony no.5 in D major – III. Romanza (excerpt)
Symphony no.5 in D major – I. Preludio
Symphony no 6 in E minor – III. Scherzo (excerpt)
Symphony no. 4 in F minor – I. Allegro (excerpt)
Symphony no.1 ‘A Sea Symphony’ – I. A Song for all Sea, all Ships (excerpt)
Symphony no. 6 in E minor- IV. Epilogue
Symphony no. 8 in D minor – IV. Toccata

Presented by Donald Macleod
Producer Sam Phillips

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page https://ift.tt/0wdCuOp

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/FCy9GHL

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Vaughan Williams Today 2/4

All this month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at this much loved composer as part of Radio 3’s ‘Vaughan Williams Today’ season, celebrating the 150th anniversary of his birth. He’ll unpack Vaughan Williams’ life story in fascinating detail over the course of four weeks and leading authorities on the composer will join him to share their new perspectives. They’ll be exploring some of the overlooked aspects of his life and music, as well as the qualities that have left such an enduring imprint on British cultural life. This week Donald chronicles Vaughan Williams’ life through the years 1914 to 1930.

When War was declared, although he was 42 Vaughan Williams immediately joined up. He was accepted as an ambulance orderly with the rank of private. Throughout the War, wherever he was posted throughout Europe, he made music with anyone and everyone. He spent much of his spare time starting up a singing class, training a choir, getting together whoever was available, whenever they had a break in their duties. Even though he didn’t “compose” during the war years, his own music did stir. He said of his 3rd Symphony, “a great deal of it incubated when I used to go up night after night with the ambulance wagon at Ecoivres and we went up a steep hill and there was a wonderful Corot-like landscape in the sunset – it’s not really lambkins frisking at all, as most people take for granted.”

Music Featured:

A Cotswold Romance (The Men of Cotsall)
Lord Thou Hast Been Our Refuge
Symphony No 3 “Pastoral Symphony” – IV. Lento
Motion and Stillness (4 Poems by Fredegond Shove)
‘Four Nights’ and ‘The New Ghost’ (4 Poems by Fredegond Shove)
The Lark Ascending
O Clap Your Hands
Concerto Accademico
Piano Suite in G Major (excerpt)
Mass in G minor
In Windsor Forest (Falstaff And The Fairies)
The Pilgrim’s Progress – Act IV Scene 2 “The Shepherds of the Delectable Mountains’ (excerpt)
The Pilgrim’s Progress – Act III Scene 1 “I buy the truth!” (excerpt)
Riders to the Sea (Where is she?)
Riders to the Sea (They are all gone now)
Job – A Masque for Dancing (excerpt)
Valliant for Truth
Old King Cole
Sancta Civitas
Merciless Beauty, Three Rondels by Geoffrey Chaucer
Flos Campi
O vos omnes
Job – A Masque for Dancing
3 Poems by Walt Whitman (Nocturne)
3 Choral Hymns
Sir John in Love (excerpt)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Rosie Boulton

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page https://ift.tt/fZYJD42

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/w7RpCET

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Vaughan Williams Today 1/4

This month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at Ralph Vaughan Williams, one of the UK’s most significant music figures, as part of Radio 3’s ‘Vaughan Williams Today’ season, marking the 150th anniversary of his birth.

Ralph Vaughan Williams is one of the UK’s most significant musical figures. This month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at this much loved composer as part of Radio 3’s ‘Vaughan Williams Today’ season, marking the 150th anniversary of his birth Donald will be telling Vaughan Williams’ life story and exploring his music in fascinating detail over the course of four weeks and twenty programmes. Interleaved with Donald’s in-depth narrative accounts, some of our leading authorities on Vaughan Williams will be joining him to share new perspectives. They’ll be unpacking the overlooked and less well known aspects of a composer whose body of work and diverse interests have made such an enduring imprint on British cultural life.

The first week of this landmark series will focus on Vaughan Williams’ formative years, and his earliest works. It could be said that Vaughan Williams was pre-destined to be a leading figure in the musical life of Great Britain. He was born in 1872 with, in his own words, “a small silver spoon in his mouth” and his mother was part of the Wedgwood and Darwin dynasties. Charles Darwin was Vaughan Williams’ great uncle. Raised, after his father’s early death, in the matriarchal family home Leith Hill Place in Surrey, young Ralph was encouraged in the pursuit of knowledge from an early age. The values he was exposed to growing up are reflected in his social awareness later on. He wrote music for every kind of setting, from the concert hall to the village hall. We’ll follow his development from his very first attempt at writing music, Robin’s Nest, to the assurance of his London Symphony.

Music Featured:

The Lark Ascending (excerpt)
A vision of aeroplanes (excerpt)
The Robin’s Nest
Quintet in D major – I: Allegro moderato
Bucolic Suite – II. Andante; IV. Finale
Songs of Travel – 3. The Roadside Fire; 4. Youth and Love
In the Fen Country
Songs of Travel – 1. The vagabond
Heroic elegy & Triumphal Epilogue – I: Andante sostenuto
Folk Songs from the Eastern Counties – No 2; No 13; No 15
Norfolk Rhapsody No 1 in E minor
Five mystical songs – The Call
Toward the Unknown Region
The Water Mill
The last invocation
A Sea Symphony – III: The Waves; I: A song for all Seas (excerpt)
The Garden of Proserpine (excerpt)
Five mystical songs – Love bade me welcome
The Wasps – Overture
On Wenlock Edge – I: On Wenlock Edge; III: Is my team ploughing?
The sky above the roof
L’amour de Moy
Quant li louseignolz jolis
String Quartet No 1 in G minor – I: Allegro moderato
Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis – I: Largo sostenuto
Phantasy Quintet – IV: Burlesca, alla moderato
A London Symphony – Scherzo
Linden Lea
Serenade in A minor – IV: Romance
Harnham Down
On Wenlock Edge – Oh, when I was in love with you; Bredon Hill
A Sea Symphony – II. On the Beach at Night Alone

Presented by Donald Macleod
Producer Johannah Smith

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page https://ift.tt/KQUA9jV

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/C1z8IgD

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One Hit Wonders

Donald Macleod and guest Sarah Willis explore some of the greatest “one-hit wonders” in classical music – Johann Pachelbel, Engelbert Humperdinck, Paul Dukas, Gregorio Allegri, Henryk Górecki, Tomaso Albinoni, Giovanni Pergolesi, Pietro Mascagni, Carl Orff and Julius Fučík.

Classical music is littered with composers who are famous for just a single piece of music. In a special week of Composer of the Week programmes, Donald Macleod is joined by Berlin Philharmonic horn player Sarah Willis to explore ten of these composers and examine episodes from their lives, alongside their compositions – both their popular hits and some of their less familiar music. They also try to isolate why certain works have captured the popular imagination of audiences around the world.

Music Featured:

Pachelbel: Canon & Gigue for 3 violins and continuo in D major
Pachelbel: Christ lag in Todesbanden
Humperdinck: Erinnerung
Humperdinck: Hansel and Gretel (excerpts)
Humperdinck: Königskinder, “Verdorben! Gestorben!..Ihr Kindlein, sie sind gefunden”
Dukas: La Peri Fanfare
Dukas: L’apprenti sorcier
Dukas: Ariane et Barbe-bleu, Act III: Adieu
Allegri: Canzone Scamfortina
Allegri: Missa ‘Che fa oggi il mio sole’: Agnus Dei
Allegri: Miserere
Górecki: Symphony No 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs),1st Mvt.
Górecki: Little Requiem for a Certain Polka, Op 66, 3rd Mvt.
Górecki: Symphony No 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs), 2nd Mvt.
Górecki: Miserere
Albinoni: Overture to Zenobia
Albinoni (compl. Giazotto): Adagio in G minor
Albinoni: Concerto in B flat major for oboe and strings
Albinoni: Concerto in F major for oboe and strings
Pergolesi: Stabat Mater (excerpt)
Pergolesi: Conversione di San Guglielmo (Sinfonia)
Pergolesi: Dixit Dominus, Opening chorus
Pergolesi: Stabat Mater (excerpt)
Mascagni: Cavalleria Rusticana (Easter Hymn, Inneggiamo & Intermezzo)
Mascagni: Rapsodia Satanica, Prologue
Orff: Camina Burana, ‘O Fortuna’
Orff/Keetman: Schulwerk (excerpts)
Orff: De temporum fine comoedia
Orff: Carmina Burana (excerpt)
Fučík: Entry of the Gladiators
Fučík: Miramare
Fučík: Triglav

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Sam Phillips

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for One Hit Wonders https://ift.tt/2xMiZ3H

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/uZWEaKX

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Elmer Bernstein (1992 – 2004)

Donald Macleod talks to Peter and Emilie Bernstein about their father, award winning Hollywood film composer Elmer Bernstein, who wrote for films during the 1980s and 1990s.

Born in 1922, Elmer Bernstein created the music for more than 150 films. His big break was one of Hollywood’s biggest pictures, Cecil B DeMille’s swan song, the 1955 biblical epic, “The Ten Commandments”. At the same time as working on that enormous canvas for DeMille, Bernstein was composing the first in a series of ground-breaking jazz infused scores, “The Man with the Golden Arm”. He went on to write the music for the Hollywood adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”, Westerns which include The Magnificent Seven, surely one of the best known title themes in the history of cinema, before he became the go to composer for John Wayne. His scores for action adventures include “The Great Escape” and a moving depiction of the inner life of a prisoner in “Birdman of Alcatraz”. Nominated on numerous occasions, he won an Oscar for “Thoroughly Modern Millie”. In the 1980s he delighted younger generations of cinema goers with scores such as “National Lampoon’s Animal House”, “Ghostbusters” and “Airplane!”, before deciding to make a return to more serious drama. Projects with Martin Scorsese included the film of Edith Wharton’s novel “The Age of Innocence”, and he also created a remarkable portrait of the artist Christy Brown in “My Left Foot”. His last score, for which he received a final Oscar nomination, was for Todd Haynes’ “Far from Heaven” in 2002. He died just two years later in 2004.
As well as a hugely successful career as a film composer Elmer Bernstein assumed several leadership roles. He also financed a scheme to preserve Hollywood film scores. Among the music he preserved was Max Steiner’s King Kong.

Donald Macleod marks the centenary of this gifted and versatile film composer in conversation with Peter and Emilie Bernstein, two of Elmer Bernstein’s children. They offer a fascinating insider’s view to the film music industry alongside a personal portrait of their father.

Music Featured:

The March from Stripes
Prelude to The Ten Commandments
The Ten Commandments (excerpt)
To Kill a Mockingbird (excerpt)
Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra for two Christophers: II: Reflections
The Man with the Golden Arm (excerpt)
Walk on the Wild Side: Main title
The Magnificent Seven (excerpt)
To Kill a Mockingbird (excerpt)
True Grit (excerpt)
How Now Dow Jones: A Little Investigation
The Great Escape: Main title
Overture to Hawaii
The Birdman of Alcatraz
Summer and Smoke (excerpt)
Big Jake (excerpt)
Zulu Dawn: River Crossing
Ghostbusters theme
Suite from Airplane!
Heavy Metal: Taarna’s Theme
Ghostbusters (excerpt)
My Left Foot (excerpt)
The Grifters (excerpt)
Far from Heaven: Autumn in Connecticut
Far From Heaven (excerpt)
Rambling Rose (excerpt)
Devil in a Blue Dress (excerpt)
Cape Fear (excerpt)
The Age of Innocence: Main title

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Johannah Smith

For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004) https://ift.tt/kGLtSJq

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/uZWEaKX

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