Search

mandersmedia.co.uk

Retailers of Vinyl, CDs, DVDs etc. through Amazon, Ebay, Discogs, iHaveit, MusicStack and CD & LP. A friend of Help Musicians UK.

Tag

Composer of the Week

Antonín Dvořák

Donald Macleod explores the life, music and perseverance of Antonín Dvořák.

Antonín Dvořák was no spring chicken when he found success as a composer. He was in his early thirties before he made his mark in his native Czech Republic, despite composing from a young age. Donald Macleod follows Dvořák as he attempts to win over successive audiences: from Prague to Vienna, England to America, before eventually returning to Prague and to the opera stage. Who did he need to impress in order to achieve the success he craved?

Donald Macleod introduces us to Dvořák as he struggles to carve his path as a composer. We’ll meet his influential friends who championed his work, including Brahms, the conductor Hans Richter and the virtuoso violinist Joseph Joachim. Dvořák’s ambition eventually took him to America, but as well as inspiring many of his best-known works, found him embroiled in arguments about the nature of American music and struggling with homesickness. Donald considers what drove Dvořák to tirelessly persevere, particularly with the operatic genre, when his other works were so well received by audiences at home and abroad.

Music featured:
Slavonic Dances, Op 46 (Dumka)
In Nature’s Realm, Op 91
Symphony No 3 in E flat major, Op 10
Písně Milostné, Op 83
Serenade, Op 44
Piano Trio in F minor, Op 65
Moravian Duets, Op 32 (How small the field of Slavíkov is & Water and Tears)
Symphonic Variations, Op 78
String Quartet No 10 in E flat major, Op 51
Violin Concerto in A minor, Op 53
Czech Suite, Op 39
Stabat Mater, Op 58
Svatá Ludmila, Op 71
Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88
Requiem, Op 89 (Hostias)
Piano Trio in E minor, Op 90 (Dumky)
Cello Concerto in B minor, Op 104
Violin Sonatina in G, Op 100
Biblical Songs, op 99
String Quartet No 12 in F major, Op 96 (American)
Symphony No 9, Op 95 (From the New World)
Vanda (Overture)
The King and the Charcoal Burner (Act 11, scene 7)
Dimitrij (Act 4, scene 3)
The Noon Witch, Op 196
Rusalka (Act 3)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Cerian Arianrhod for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Antonín Dvořák https://ift.tt/2ClwfDg

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/2NLz0TQ
via IFTTT

Harrison Birtwistle

Donald Macleod talks to Sir Harrison Birtwistle about his life, inspiration and music.

This week Donald Macleod meets Sir Harrison Birtwistle, described as “the most forceful and uncompromisingly original composer of his generation.” We hear his major compositions, broadly in chronological order, and reveal the preoccupations and processes behind a singular music imagination.

To begin, we’ll hear about, Birtwistle’s daily working life, and about his early years among what became known as the Manchester school of composers. The premiere of his first opera Punch and Judy at Aldeburgh was infamous – much of the audience – including its commissioner Benjamin Britten – walked out at the interval. Next, we’ll hear about Birtwistle’s time in America and his friendship with Morton Feldman. They discuss some of his non-musical inspirations too: the power of mythology, the paintings of Paul Klee and the films of Quentin Tarantino. Birtwistle reveals how time, and the instruments for measuring time, have inspired many of his compositions, and how a lifelong fascination with moths inspired a new work meditating on loss.

Music featured:
Oockooing Bird
Refrains and Choruses
Punch and Judy (The Resolve; Passion Aria; Adding Song)
Tragoedia
Dinah and Nick’s Love Song
Trio
Chronometer
The Triumph of Time
Duets for Storab (Urlar; Stark Pastoral; Crunluath)
Carmen Arcadiae Mechanicae Perpetuum
The Mask of Orpheus (13th, 14th 15th Arch from Act 2, Scene 2)
Silbury Air
Nine Settings of Lorine Niedecker (There’s A Better Shine; How The White Gulls; My Life; Sleep’s Dream)
Earth Dances
Harrison’s Clocks (Clock 2; Clock 5)
Panic
Virelai (Sus une fontayne)
The Minotaur (Part Two)
The Moth Requiem
In Broken Images
Duet for Eight Strings

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Iain Chambers for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Harrison Birtwistle https://ift.tt/2N6O1R1

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/2NtPCzr
via IFTTT

Muzio Clementi

Donald Macleod delves into the life and work of piano prodigy Muzio Clementi.

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world’s three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him – putting him in direct competition with them. Across the episode, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters. We’ll hear the stories of his musical duel with Mozart, stage-sharing with Haydn, brushes with Beethoven and dispute with John Field over a hat.

Music featured:
Symphony No 3 (Finale)
Musical Characteristics, Op 19
Piano Sonata in A flat Major, WoO 13
Sonata for piano, Op 2 No 4
Duetto in C Major, Op 3 No 3 (Presto)
Mozart (arr. Clementi): Symphony no. 40 in G minor, K 550 (Finale)
Sonata in G minor, Op 7 No 3
Toccata in B flat Major, Op 11 No 2
Sonata in B flat major, Op 24 No 2
Variations on Mozart’s Batti, batti, o bel Masetto from Don Giovanni, WoO 10
Sonata in E flat major, Op. 8 No 2 (II. Larghetto con espressione)
Symphony in B flat major, Op 18 No 1 (I. Allegro Assai)
Sonata in G minor, Op 9 No 2
Overture in D Major
Symphony No 4
Capriccio in F major, Op 34 No 2
Monferinas selection
Sonata, Op 34 No 2
Concerto for piano and orchestra (II. Adagio e cantibile)
Piano Sonata in F minor, Op 13 No 6 (III. Presto)
Adagio sostenuto in F major (Gradus ad Parnassum, Book I, No 14)
Sonata in B minor, Op 40 No 2 (II. Largo)
Symphony No 2 in D major ( Finale)
Symphony No 1 in C major (III. Minuet and Trio)
Piano Sonata in G minor, Op 50 No 3 “Didone abbandonata”

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Muzio Clementi https://ift.tt/35OAmFM

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/32t06Fn
via IFTTT

Sergei Prokofiev

Donald Macleod explores the music of Sergei Prokofiev and tells the story of his American dream.

After a series of revolutions in his native Russia, the young composer Sergei Prokofiev made the decision to leave his homeland and to head to the United States in search of fame and fortune. His years in the United States would turn into some of the most tumultuous of his life. Across this week, Donald explores how those years in exile and how it would prove to be one of his most challenging periods professionally, financially and personally. His life was set against the turbulent events of the first half of the twentieth century, and forces beyond his control so often intervened to scupper his grand ambitions.

Music featured:
Violin Concerto No 1 in D, Op 19 (3rd movement)
Seven, They Are Seven, Op 30
Sonata for piano No 2, Op 14 (3rd & 4th movements)
Visions Fugitives, Op 22 (selection)
Symphony No 1 in D major, Op 25 (Classical)
Tales of an Old Grandmother, Op 31
Overture on Hebrew Themes, Op 34
Prelude from 10 pieces for piano, Op 12
Concerto No 1 for piano and orchestra in D flat major, Op 10 (excerpts)
Scythian Suite, Op 20
The Love for Three Oranges Symphonic Suite, Op 33bis (Marche)
Four Pieces, Op 32 (selection)
Piano Concerto No 3 in C major, Op 26
Five melodies for violin and piano, Op 35bis (selection)
The Fiery Angel, Op 37 (Act IV Scene 1)
Sonata No 3 in A minor, Op 28
The Gambler: Four Portraits from the Opera, Op 49 (Portrait No 1; Alexis)
Piano Concerto No 2 in G minor, Op 16
Quintet in G minor, Op 39 (Selection)
The Prodigal Son, Op 46 (Scene 2, excerpt)
Chout Suite, Op 21 (excerpts)
American Overture, Op 42
Peter and the Wolf (excerpt)
Five Poems, Op 36 (selection)
The Love of Three Oranges Symphonic Suite, Op 33bis
Romeo and Juliet, Op 64 (excerpts)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Glyn Tansley for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Sergei Prokofiev https://ift.tt/2MacTqJ

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/2M84tQu
via IFTTT

Gustav Mahler

Donald Macleod explores the music and life of Gustav Mahler through five key themes.

This week’s episode begins with an exploration of love – a potent force in Mahler’s creative armoury, but, for Mahler’s wife Alma, it came at a heavy price. Mahler was also obsessed with human mortality, but that became all too real with the tragic death of his daughter Maria. We’ll also hear about the composer’s ambivalent relationship to religion. Despite his lack of adherence to a particular creed, Mahler’s work is shot through with a genuine religious sense. Next, Donald discusses the vein of tart humour in Mahler’s music, from the gently sardonic to the out-and-out grotesque. Finally Donald tells how Mahler’s profound love of the natural world seeped into almost everything he wrote.

Music featured:
Liebst du um Schönheit
Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (No 4, ‘Die zwei blauen Augen’)
Wo die schönen Trompeten blasen
Symphony No 5 (4th mvt, Adagietto)
Symphony No 6 (1st movement, Allegro energico, ma non troppo)
Rückert-Lieder (Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen)
Symphony No 4 (2nd movement, In gemächlicher Bewegung, ohne Hast)
Kindertotenlieder (Nun will die Sonn’ so hell aufgeh’n)
Symphony No 6 (4th movement, Finale. Allegro moderato – Allegro energico)
Symphony No 8 (Part 1, extract – ‘Veni creator spiritus’)
Symphony No 4 (4th movement, Sehr behaglich)
Symphony No 10 (3rd movement, Purgatorio – Unheimlich bewegt)
Symphony No 2 (‘Resurrection’) (5th movement, Finale)
Des Knaben Wunderhorn (Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt)
Symphony No 1 in D (‘Titan’) (3rd movement, Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen)
Symphony No 2 (3rd movement, In ruhig fliessender Bewegung)
Symphony No 7 (3rd movement, Scherzo: Schatternhaft)
Symphony No 9 (3rd movement, Rondo-Burleske)
Lieder und gesänge aus Jugendzeit (Ablösung im Sommer)
Symphony No 3 (3rd movement, Comodo)
Das Lied von der Erde (6. Der Abschied)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Gustav Mahler https://ift.tt/2mh1kDR

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/2m8ztG3
via IFTTT

Henry Purcell

Donald Macleod explores the music and life of Henry Purcell.

Frustratingly little is known about the tragically abbreviated life of the composer who is arguably Britain’s greatest, Henry Purcell. Purcell kept no diary of his own – at least none has survived – and if he was active as a letter-writer, precious little of his correspondence has come down to us. Our evidence for the facts of the composer’s life appears in a sequence of glimpses – a portrait here, an anecdote there, unvarnished entries in the official records of the time. Donald begins with a whistle-stop trip through the scanty facts of the composer’s biography, and then looks at a single year, 1680, in which Purcell emerged as one of the greatest contrapuntists of his time. We hear about the pieces he wrote to mark specific events, from King Charles’ escape from shipwreck to the passing of Queen Mary. Next, an excursion round six key Purcellian venues, from pint-sized York Buildings to gargantuan Westminster Abbey. Finally, Donald tells stories of the relatively small but extraordinarily rich body of work Purcell wrote for intimate, domestic settings.
His smaller-scale work – catches, songs, keyboard and chamber music – is generally less well-known, but contains some absolute gems. In a sense, it’s the music that Purcell didn’t have to write.

Music featured:
Sound the trumpet (Come ye sons of art, Z323)
Chacony in G minor, Z730
I was glad, Z19
Now does the glorious day appear, Z332
The Indian Queen, Z630 (Act 3, extract)
Thou knowest, Lord, Z58c
Theodosius, Z606 (‘Hail to the myrtle shade’)
Fantazia IV in G minor, Z735
Fantazia V in B flat major, Z736
Theodosius, Z606 (Act 1, scene 1)
Fantazia VIII in D minor, Z739
Fantazia VI in F major, Z737
Welcome, vicegerent of the mighty king, Z340
Fantazia X in E minor, Z741
Fantazia XI in G major, Z742
March, Z860
Funeral Sentences (Man that is born of a woman, Z27 – In the midst of life, Z17 – Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts, Z58b)
Welcome to all the pleasures, Z339
They that go down to the sea in ships, Z57
Of old, when heroes thought it base, Z333
Who can from joy refrain, Z342
The Fairy Queen, Z629 (Act 3)
Rejoice in the Lord alway, Z49 (Bell anthem)
Ye tuneful Muses, Z344
Hail, Bright Cecilia, Z328
My heart is inditing, Z30
The Fairy Queen, Z629 (Act 4, extract)
Since the Duke is return’d, Z271
Overture in G, Z770
Suite No 7 in D minor, Z668
Sonata No 7 in E minor, Z796 (Twelve Sonnata’s of III Parts)
O! Fair Cedaria, hide those eyes, Z402
I resolve against cringing and whining, Z386
I take no pleasure in the sun’s bright beams, Z388
She loves and she confesses too, Z413
Sonata No 6 in G minor, Z807
Tell me, some pitying angel, Z196
Fantasia upon one note, Z745

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Henry Purcell https://ift.tt/30gXA7k

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/30hdgYd
via IFTTT

Franz Schubert

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of Franz Schubert.

It’s hard to think of a composer more gregarious than Schubert, and further removed from the image of the reclusive genius, closeted away in his artistic ivory tower, creating peerless masterpieces in splendid isolation. From his days at Vienna’s Stadtkonvikt, the Imperial Catholic boarding school that offered the best general and musical education in the Austrian capital, Schubert developed a wide and supportive network of highly cultured friends, with whom he explored art, politics, religion, literature, and, of course, music; frequented the odd tavern or three; and attended convivial social gatherings in the homes of well-heeled admirers, from which developed the tradition of the ‘Schubertiad’ – informal get-togethers devoted to the performance of Schubert’s music, and above all, his songs.

In this week’s episode, we’ll start by meeting Schubert’s friends, and then take a trip round Vienna in search of Schubert’s audience. Next, Donald gives us a whistle-stop tour of the jaw-droppingly productive year that’s been called Schubert’s annus mirabilis, 1815. We’ll also hear how Schubert faced the challenge of following in Beethoven’s footsteps, and about the posthumous discovery of much of his music, including many of his most-loved works.

Music featured:
‘An die Musik’, D547
‘Suleika I’ D720
‘Geheimes’, D719
Symphony No 8 in B minor (‘Unfinished’), D759
‘Über Wildemann’, D884
‘Sehnsucht’, D879
‘Das Zügenglöcklein’, D871
Gesang (‘An Sylvia’), D891
String Quartet in D minor, D 810 (‘Death and the Maiden’)
Mass in F, D105 (Sanctus)
Overture in D, D590 (‘In the Italian style’)
Der Zwillingsbrüder, D647 (No 3, Aria, ‘Der Vater mag wohl immer Kind mich nennen’)
String Quartet in A minor, D804 (‘Rosamunde’)
Psalm 92, D953
Piano Trio in E flat, D929 (Op 100)
Erlkönig’, D328
Piano Sonata in E, D157
Mass in G, D167 (Agnus Dei)
String Quartet in G minor, D173
Der vierjährige Posten, D190
Symphony No 3 in D, D200
‘Heidenröslein’, D257
‘Gebet während der Schlacht’, D171
‘An die Nachtigall’, D196
‘Die Mondnacht’, D238
‘Das Rosenband’, D280
Beethoven: ‘Der Zufriedene’, Op 75 No 6
Schubert: ‘Der Zufriedene’, D320
Symphony No 4 in C minor (‘Tragic’), D417
‘Abschied’, D957 No 7
‘Der Atlas’, D 957 No 8
Octet in F for clarinet, horn, bassoon, string quartet and double bass, D803
‘Auf dem Strom’, D943
Liszt, after Schubert: Die Rose – Lied von Franz Schubert, S556/1
Symphony in C, D 944
Piano Sonata in A, D959
String Quintet in C, D 956
Ständchen, D920

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Franz Schubert https://ift.tt/312RF2M

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/310Krwm
via IFTTT

Guillaume Dufay

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons to explore Guillaume Dufay’s life and music.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and the founder of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the episode, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious reputation, examine the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Music featured:
St. Anthony of Padua Mass
Ce jour de l’an
Quel fronte signorillo
C’est bien raison de devoir essaucier
Ave Regina caelorum
Missa Ave regina caelorum
Motet: Apostolo gloriosum
Seigneur Leon, vous soyés bienvenus
Missa Sancti Jacobi – Offertorium
Magnificat tertii et quarti toni
Missa Ecce ancilla Domini – Sanctus
Malheureulx cueur
Motet: Moribus et genere
Adieu ces bons vins de Lannoys
Missa Sine Nomine – Kyrie & Gloria
Ballade: Resvelliés-vous et faites chiere lye
Vasilissa ergo gaude
O Sancte Sebastiane
Missa Sancti Jacobi – Sanctus, Agnus Dei
Vergene Bella
La Belle se siet
Ballade: Se la face ay pale
Flos Florum
Ecclesiae militantis
Balsamus et munda cera
Supremum est mortalibus bonum
Ave Maris Stella
L’alta tua bellezza
Salve flos Tusce gentis
Ce moys de may
Bon jour, bon mois
Il sera par vous combatu
Missa L’homme armé – Kyrie
S’il est Plaisir
Je me complains
Par le regard
Ave regina caelorum II
Sanctus Ave verum corpus
Gaude virgo

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Johannah Smith for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Guillaume Dufay https://ift.tt/2ZJ2x4I

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/30KBwyR
via IFTTT

Edward Elgar

Donald Macleod explores Edward Elgar’s music through the locations that inspired him.

Worcester-born, with his roots in the beautiful English countryside around Hereford and the Malverns yet drawn to the bright lights of London, English composer Edward Elgar moved house a lot. He lived in over 25 residences in his lifetime, stayed with friends, travelled often for work and pleasure in the UK, Europe and further afield, and had a number of second homes he rented as retreats. This week we’re focusing on the locations that were important to Elgar, and the places that inspired his music. Following Elgar’s journeys, Donald takes us from home life in the Midlands to country cottage holidays, summers in Europe and as far afield as the Amazon.

Music featured:
Pomp and Circumstance March, Op 39 No 1 in D major
Cockaigne (In London Town)
Salut d’amour, Op 12
O Happy Eyes, Op 18 No 1
The Dream of Gerontius, Op 38
Owls, an Epitaph, Op 53 No 4 (Four Choral Songs)
Enigma Variations, Op 36
Symphony No 2 (3rd movement)
String Quartet (2nd movement)
Introduction ‘The woodland interlude’ (Caractacus)
Sea Pictures, Op 37
Piano Quintet, Op 84 (3rd movt – Andante – Allegro)
Cello Concerto in E minor, Op 85 (1st movement)
In Smyrna
Paris – Five Quadrilles
From the Bavarian Highlands, Op 27 Nos 3 – 6
In the South (Alassio)
Mina
The Wand of Youth Suite No 1, Op 1a
Organ Sonata No 1 in G major, Op 28 (2nd movement)
Severn Suite, Op 87
Lux Aeterna (choral arrangement of Enigma Variations Op 36 Nimrod by John Cameron)

Presented by Donald Macleod
Produced by Amy Wheel for BBC Wales

For full tracklistings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page for Edward Elgar https://ift.tt/31cRr9e

And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we’ve featured on Composer of the Week here: https://ift.tt/2vwHS8q

from Composer of the Week https://ift.tt/2GGGvc4
via IFTTT

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: