Search

mandersmedia.co.uk

Retailers of Vinyl, CDs, DVDs etc. through Amazon, Ebay, Discogs, iHaveit, MusicStack and CD & LP. A friend of Help Musicians UK.

Tag

Discogs Blog

NeahkahnieGold New Features Make It Easy to Add To And Sell From Your Collection

The music we collect is a part of who we are. It’s a physical manifestation of the music we love and a way to keep tabs on the evolution of our listening habits.

A few years back, Discogs released a feature that allows music collectors to catalog their personal collections. If you’re not using the Discogs Collection feature, you should be. It’s free and has numerous benefits. You can:

I’m just skimming the surface here, but hopefully you get the gist. The Collection feature is an invaluable tool for anyone who loves physical music.

Today, we’re pleased to announce two new features to the Discogs Collection:

  • List to sell from Collection
  • Add to Collection after purchase

Mark For Sale

Gone are the days of finding the release page of the record you have to list it for sale. As long as you have a record in your Collection, you can quickly list it on the Discogs Marketplace

 
There’s an added bonus for those of you that keep your Collection meticulously annotated. If you have the condition of your copy listed in your Collection, it will carry over to the sales listing.

Add To Collection After Purchase

If you’re like us, one of the first things you do after dropping the needle on the record the postman just dropped off is adding it to your Collection. Back in the day, you’d have to scour all of Discogs to locate the specific record you purchased and add it from that release page. Well, those days are officially over. You can now add Discogs purchases to your Collection with just a couple of clicks.

 
Adding items from the Purchases tab will transfer the condition of the item as listed by the seller as well. So as long as the record was shipped properly and there were no postal mishaps, this should be a time saver as well.

Can you believe there was a time when this feature didn’t exist? We can’t either. Adding to Collection from Discogs purchases is now a breeze – especially when you consider the time saved when adding multiple items from one page. If you’re forgetful like us, we can even remind you with an email or private message a few weeks after the item is marked shipped. Try it out on your own here.

These additions to the Collection tool should make your life easier. Whether you want to add to or sell from your Collection, there are now fewer steps involved. Let us know your thoughts below and happy collecting!

The post New Features Make It Easy to Add To And Sell From Your Collection appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2XIK8bU
via IFTTT

Advertisements

Discogs Staff The Big, Friendly Sound Of Audio-Technica’s M50xBT

#body {padding-left:0;padding-right:0;} .page-title h1, h1.post-entry-title, .post-entry-title h1 {font-family: ‘Montserrat’, sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; font-size:2.75em;font-weight:900;} .post-entry-top-single, .post-entry-content p, .post-entry-end-of-content, #comment-form, .content h1, .content h2, .content h3, .content h4, .content h5, .content h6 {padding-left:35px;padding-right:35px;} .content h2 {padding-top:0;font-size:22px;} .post-entry-top-single {border:0;margin-bottom:0;} .video-container {position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top: 30px; height: 0; overflow: hidden; margin:15px 0 30px;} .video-container iframe, .video-container object, .video-container embed {position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;} .blog_entity_review img {margin-top:6px;} .post-entry-media a {border:0;} .post-entry-single .post-entry-media {padding:0;border:0;} .blog_entity_review h4 {margin-bottom:15px;font-size:28px;line-height: 1.25em;} .desktop-prince {text-align:center;margin-top:45px} .mobile-prince {display:none;} #page-boxed {background:#fff;} #page-boxed .wrap {background-color: white; box-shadow: none;} .post-entry-media a {border:0 } .single .wrap {max-width: unset; width:100%;} .post-entry-single .post-entry-media a {height:auto;} .post-entry-media a img {position: relative; top: 0%; transform: translateY(0%); width: 100%;} #body {max-width:900px; margin:0 auto } .post-entry-single .post-entry-media {padding-bottom:0; border:0; margin-bottom: 25px;} p, .blog_entity_review p, .post-entry-single .post-entry-content {color:#666666; line-height:1.5em; font-size:18px;} .cont; ent .highlights {padding-left:19px } .blog_entity_review p {padding-bottom:18px;} .blog_entity_review p:first-child {padding:0;} .content .highlights li {margin-bottom:17px;} .post-entry-end-of-content {border-top:0;} @media (max-width: 640px){.post-album-cover {width:150px} .blog_entity_review p, .blog_entity_review div {padding-left:0;max-width:440px;margin: 0 auto} .blog_entity_review img {width:100%; margin: 0 auto 25px;}} .album-display { display:block; position:relative; overflow:hidden; background:#16aadf; margin:10px auto 22px;max-width: 830px; /* padding:60px 20px; */ } .album-display img { display:block; width:220px; float:left; box-shadow:-30px 0px 19px 35px rgba(0,0,0,.3); } .album-info { position:relative; z-index:2; width:100%; margin:0 auto; } .album-display h2,.album-display h4,.album-display h5 { width: calc(100% – 242px); float:right; text-align:left; display:block; padding:0; color:#fff !important; font-size:19px; white-space: nowrap; overflow:hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis; font-family: ‘Montserrat’, sans-serif; font-weight:900; text-transform:uppercase; line-height:32px; position:relative; z-index:3; text-shadow:2px 2px 3px rgba(0,0,0,.3); padding-right:21px; } .album-display h2 { font-size:32px; line-height:39px; margin-top:4px; padding-left:0px; margin-left:0px; } .album-display h4 { font-size:23px; line-height:32px; } .album-display h5 { font-size:19px; line-height:32px; } .album-background { display:block; -webkit-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -moz-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -o-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -ms-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); opacity:.5; position:absolute; top:-18px; left:-18px; height:115%; width:115%; z-index:1; background-size:200%; } .small-button { background:#333; position:relative; z-index:3; width:auto; text-align:left; color:#fff; display:inline-block; padding:15px; margin:15px 0 0 20px; text-shadow:0; ; font-weight:bold; text-transform:uppercase; } a.small-button {color:#fff;} .small-button:hover {background:#16aadf;box-shadow:1px 1px 1px 0px rgba(0,0,0,.5)} a {cursor: pointer;} .album-photos, .cassette-photos {max-width: 1100px;min-width: 700px; margin:0 auto; overflow:auto; line-height:1.25em; font-size:15px; padding: 15px 0px 35px} .album-photos div, .cassette-photos div {width:calc(33.3333333% – 12px); margin-right:18px; float:left; border-bottom:1px solid #eee; padding-bottom:11px;} .cassette-photos div {width:calc(25% – 13.5px)} .photos-container {display: block; max-width: 1000px; margin:0 auto ;overflow-y: scroll; overflow-x: auto;} .cassette-photos img {width:100%;} .album-photos span, .cassette-photos span {width:100%; display:block; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis;} @media (max-width: 640px) {.album-info {padding-bottom:25px;} .album-display h2,.album-display h4,.album-display h5 {width:100%; padding-left:23px; padding-right:23px;} .album-display h2 {margin-top:15px;} .album-display img {width:100%;box-shadow:0px 0px 24px 9px rgba(0,0,0,.3)} .post-entry-top-single, .post-entry-content p, .post-entry-end-of-content, #comment-form, .content h1, .content h2, .content h3, .content h4, .content h5, .content h6 {padding-left:23px;padding-right:23px;} .album-photos, .cassette-photos {padding:10px 20px 30px}.post-album-cover {width:150px} a.small-button {margin-left:0;}} blockquote { position: relative; /* background: #ddd; */ color:#16aadf;padding:0; margin: 20px 0px 38px; border-top: 2px solid #16aadf; border-bottom: 2px solid #16aadf;} blockquote p {color:#16aadf;font-size:31px;line-height:1.125em;padding:33px 15px 33px 56px !important; font-weight:bold;} blockquote:before, blockquote:after {position: absolute; font-weight: bold; font-size: 112px; line-height: 0px; color:#16aadf;} blockquote:before {top: 71px;left: 3px;font-family: ‘Montserrat’, sans-serif;font-weight:400;}blockquote:after {right: 15px;content:””;} @media screen and (max-width: 760px) {#page-boxed {padding: 0;} blockquote {margin-left:0; margin-right:0;} blockquote p {padding-left:60px;} blockquote:before{left:7px;}} .album-photos div:last-child, .cassette-photos div:last-child {margin-right:0;}.post-entry-meta, .post-entry-meta .post-entry-social-links a {display:none;}

By Jeffrey Lee Puckett

Headphones make me nervous. Whenever I wear an over-the-ear model in public, I feel like I’m being followed by a parade of murderous freaks and rabid bears, all of them just waiting until “Running On Empty” ends so they can cut me in half.

But maybe that’s just me, because headphones are obviously wildly popular, and few more so than the Audio-Technica ATH-M50, of which AT has sold nearly 2 million pair. The ATH-M50xBT, under review here, is the latest iteration of the M50 line and by popular demand does away with wires altogether (if you so choose).

The ATH-M50 was a standard studio quality professional headphone. The ATH-M50x added the ability to switch out cables for use with smartphones and laptops in addition to headphone amps. The BT in ATH-M50xBT stands for Bluetooth and Bluetooth is freedom, albeit with some compromises.

Overall, the ATH-M50xBT offers sound quality that’s both accurate and forgiving. It’s a big, friendly sound with ample bass and plenty of treble energy, and they don’t err in favor of either tonal extreme. The sound quality does, however, change depending on how they’re used.

The headphones connected to my iPhone flawlessly via Bluetooth and I never had to reintroduce them — as far as ease of connectivity, these things are a dream. They did require my phone to be in close proximity at all times, however; if you leave the room without your phone the music stops, which can be a real problem when you’re in the middle of “High Voltage.” They also hold a charge for a very long time, maybe not as much as the claimed 40 hours but AC/DC tends to drain a battery.

In the real world, distance from your phone is a non-issue as the ATH-M50xBT are meant to be used on your daily commute, in airports, and while the best years of your life are being sacrificed to data entry. In other words, your phone is always going to be by your side. I didn’t have to endure the data entry test but the connection never wavered for me, whether my phone was sitting on a nearby table, stuffed in a messenger bag or tucked into my pocket.

ATH-M50xBT Wireless Over-Ear Headphones

I listened via Bluetooth for hours before trying the provided 1/8-inch cable and all was fine. The orchestrated chaos of Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s “Volunteered Slavery” was unraveled nicely, for example, as was the aforementioned Jackson Browne.

But when I used the cable with a MacBook Pro there was a definite step up in clarity and quality. A slight graininess disappeared and everything just sounded a bit more effortless. This was most evident on one of my go-to albums for both music and sound quality: “Ella and Louis,” a 1956 recording by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong that shames 98-percent of modern recordings.

Using the cheap, simple cable, Ella’s voice regained its purity and Armstrong’s trumpet was strident, as it should be, but not piercing. The difference between wired and Bluetooth was less noticeable on FKA Twigs’ “Pendulum,” but there was a heightened sense of immersion using the cable — I fell into the song rather than simply heard it.

This was most likely due to the quality of the Macbook’s digital-to-analog converter, because using the cable with an iPhone didn’t produce the same results. That bodes well for the ATH-M50xBT’s ability to keep pace with various equipment upgrades, and when listening to these in a crowded airport are you really going to notice the fifth layer of vocals FKA adds to any given song? Probably not.

As far as looks go, the ATH-M50xBT is defiantly old school. It’s a pair of black cans, man, and that’s fine. The thick padding and the size of the cups were ideal for me — at no point did my ears get sore, although they did get hot — and that’s a marked contrast to some other torture-chamber ‘phones I’ve owned.

At $200, the ATH-M50xBT will require some budgeting for a lot of people, although its street price is usually around $170. That’s still a lot of money for a lot of people, but I’d rather listen to these than my $40 pair of wired Monoprice headphones, which make every recording sound exactly the same: bass heavy, dark and stiff.

The ATH-M50xBT sound like music.

This article was produced in partnership with Audio Technica.

The post The Big, Friendly Sound Of Audio-Technica’s M50xBT appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2lg2mPq
via IFTTT

NeahkahnieGold The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of May 2019

To say that Peggy Gou is having a good year is an understatement. Following high-profile features in publications like The New York Times and The Guardian, the 28-year old Berlin-based South Korean producer has been on a whirlwind tour playing some of the biggest clubs and festivals in the world. Her 2018 EP Once was practically unavoidable last summer and her 2019 Dj-Kicks release was met with not-awful reviews from both Resident Advisor and Pitchfork. So it’s no surprise that her momentum is still spinning on the heels of April’s Moment EP, which topped May’s list of trending releases sold on Discogs.

What is surprising is the 12” Freq Nasty ‎– Amped (Dub) / Transforma release making the list, even if it is at position #41. The record dropped in May 2001, a few months after Discogs was founded…18 years ago! It’s catching a second wind, with dozens sold on Discogs in May alone. LA-based Freq Nasty is considered a pioneer of Breaks style, though he hasn’t released anything for at least five years. Regardless, the two tracks on the release are no doubt being played in clubs around the world. Why it’s seeing such a resurgence is over my head though, if you have any clues help me out by dropping them in the comments below.

If indie rock is more your speed than you have undoubtedly come across Vampire Weekend – Father Of The Bride in your favorite online publications and local record shops. Though it might seem like Vampire Weekend is past their prime (their self-titled release hit shelves more than 11 years ago!), Father Of The Bride is without question one of the strongest indie releases of 2019.

Prince and Stereolab each notched multiple appearances in May’s trending releases. The Artist (Formerly Known As Prince) ‎– The Versace Experience – Prelude 2 Gold cassette finally got a re-release, after nearly 20 years. The limited-edition first batch had copies selling for more than $4,000 – making it the most valuable cassette ever sold on Discogs. Luckily, the 2019 RSD releases (available in purple and white) have a median sale price of just under $20.

You’ve heard of K-pop, but how about K-house? All jokes aside, it was a great month for female South Korean Electronic producers. In addition to Peggy Gou, Hye-Jin Park – If U Want It placed in the top-20 most trending releases. The sleeper hit from last year is a must-listen for anyone interested in evolving trends in House music.

There’s gold in this month’s list no matter your musical inclinations. Dig into the most trending releases on Discogs in May 2019 below.

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
Don’t miss a beat!
Subscribe to Discogs Newsletters for music news, contests, exclusive vinyl & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account here.
––––

The post The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of May 2019 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2LOwXiy
via IFTTT

dharmachine We Must Be In Heaven, Man! – A Guide To Summer of ’69 – Peace, Love and Music

#body {padding-left:0;padding-right:0;} .page-title h1, h1.post-entry-title, .post-entry-title h1 {font-family: ‘Montserrat’, sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; font-size:2.75em;} .post-entry-top-single, .post-entry-content p, .post-entry-end-of-content, #comment-form, .content h1, .content h2, .content h3, .content h4, .content h5, .content h6 {padding-left:35px;padding-right:35px;} .content h2 {padding-top:0;font-size:22px;} .post-entry-top-single {border:0;margin-bottom:0;} .video-container {position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top: 30px; height: 0; overflow: hidden; margin:10px 0 40px;} .video-container iframe, .video-container object, .video-container embed {position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;} .blog_entity_review img {margin-top:6px;} .post-entry-media a {border:0;} .post-entry-single .post-entry-media {padding:0;border:0;} .blog_entity_review h4 {margin-bottom:15px;font-size:28px;line-height: 1.25em;} .desktop-prince {text-align:center;margin-top:45px} .mobile-prince {display:none;} #page-boxed {background:#fff;} #page-boxed .wrap {background-color: white; box-shadow: none;} .post-entry-media a {border:0 } .single .wrap {max-width: unset; width:100%;} .post-entry-single .post-entry-media a {height:auto;} .post-entry-media a img {position: relative; top: 0%; transform: translateY(0%); width: 100%;} #body {max-width:900px; margin:0 auto } .post-entry-single .post-entry-media {padding-bottom:0; border:0; margin-bottom: 25px;} p, .blog_entity_review p, .post-entry-single .post-entry-content {color:#666666; line-height:1.5em; font-size:18px;} .cont; ent .highlights {padding-left:19px } .blog_entity_review p {padding-bottom:18px;} .blog_entity_review p:first-child {padding:0;} .content .highlights li {margin-bottom:17px;} .post-entry-end-of-content {border-top:0;} @media (max-width: 640px){.post-album-cover {width:150px} .blog_entity_review p, .blog_entity_review div {padding-left:0;max-width:440px;margin: 0 auto} .blog_entity_review img {width:100%; margin: 0 auto 25px;}} .album-display { display:block; position:relative; overflow:hidden; background:#16aadf; margin:10px auto 22px;max-width: 830px; /* padding:60px 20px; */ } .album-display img { display:block; width:220px; float:left; box-shadow:-30px 0px 19px 35px rgba(0,0,0,.3); } .album-info { position:relative; z-index:2; width:100%; margin:0 auto; } .album-display h2,.album-display h4,.album-display h5 { width: calc(100% – 242px); float:right; text-align:left; display:block; padding:0; color:#fff !important; font-size:19px; white-space: nowrap; overflow:hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis; font-family: ‘Montserrat’, sans-serif; text-transform:uppercase; line-height:32px; position:relative; z-index:3; text-shadow:2px 2px 3px rgba(0,0,0,.3); padding-right:21px; } .album-display h2 { font-size:32px; line-height:39px; margin-top:4px; padding-left:0px; margin-left:0px; } .album-display h4 { font-size:23px; line-height:32px; } .album-display h5 { font-size:19px; line-height:32px; } .album-background { display:block; -webkit-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -moz-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -o-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); -ms-filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); filter: blur(16px) grayscale(1); opacity:.5; position:absolute; top:-18px; left:-18px; height:115%; width:115%; z-index:1; background-size:200%; } .small-button { background:#333; position:relative; z-index:3; width:auto; text-align:left; color:#fff; display:inline-block; padding:15px; margin:15px 0 0 20px; text-shadow:0; ; font-weight:bold; text-transform:uppercase; } a.small-button {color:#fff;} .small-button:hover {background:#16aadf;box-shadow:1px 1px 1px 0px rgba(0,0,0,.5)} a {cursor: pointer;} .album-photos, .cassette-photos {max-width: 1100px;min-width: 700px; margin:0 auto; overflow:auto; line-height:1.25em; font-size:15px; padding: 15px 0px 35px} .album-photos div, .cassette-photos div {width:calc(33.3333333% – 12px); margin-right:18px; float:left; border-bottom:1px solid #eee; padding-bottom:11px;} .cassette-photos div {width:calc(25% – 13.5px)} .photos-container {display: block; max-width: 1000px; margin:0 auto ;overflow-y: scroll; overflow-x: auto;} .cassette-photos img {width:100%;} .album-photos span, .cassette-photos span {width:100%; display:block; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis;} @media (max-width: 640px) {.album-info {padding-bottom:25px;} .album-display h2,.album-display h4,.album-display h5 {width:100%; padding-left:23px; padding-right:23px;} .album-display h2 {margin-top:15px;} .album-display img {width:100%;box-shadow:0px 0px 24px 9px rgba(0,0,0,.3)} .post-entry-top-single, .post-entry-content p, .post-entry-end-of-content, #comment-form, .content h1, .content h2, .content h3, .content h4, .content h5, .content h6 {padding-left:23px;padding-right:23px;} .album-photos, .cassette-photos {padding:10px 20px 30px}.post-album-cover {width:150px} a.small-button {margin-left:0;}} @media screen and (max-width: 760px) {#page-boxed {padding: 0;}} .album-photos div:last-child, .cassette-photos div:last-child {margin-right:0;}

In celebration of Woodstock’s 50th anniversary, Rhino Records launched Summer of ’69 – Peace, Love, and Music campaign, which celebrates Woodstock and independent record stores. They’re releasing limited-edition vinyl reissues exclusively at indie shops throughout the Summer. From dreamy-eyed avant-garde folksters to Van The Man to psychedelic pioneers of the jam band universe, the offerings speak to the scene that came into and out of the Woodstock vibe. With so many LPs to dive into — some of which are available on vinyl for the first time in decades — it can be hard to keep track, so here are a few Summer Of ’69 highlights:

The Grateful Dead - Fillmore West, February 28, 1969 for sale

Fillmore West, February 28, 1969

The Grateful Dead

(2019)

Seemingly, across Deadhead communities, this is by far one of the Dead’s best shows and full of mindboggling performances from the entire band. This second night at Fillmore West includes “(Walk Me Out In The) Morning Dew” and their rendition of Slim Harpo‘s, “I’m a King Bee.” Dick Latvala said “The best and most exciting G.D. show ever is without a doubt 2/28/69- Fillmore West!!!

Buffalo Springfield - self-titled for sale

Buffalo Springfield

Buffalo Springfield

(1966)

Neil Young and Stephen Stills‘ debut album with Buffalo Springfield features the iconic protest song “For What It’s Worth” even though the song didn’t appear on the original pressing it is included on this stereo breakout from the Buffalo Springfield boxset. In 1998, Stephen Stills lent some chill vocals for Public Enemy‘s “He Got Game” that sampled the hook from “For What It’s Worth “… from protest song to background for Ray Allen’s sweet jump shot in Spike Lee’s “He Got Game,” that’s a helluva journey.

van Morrison ‎– Moondance for sale

Moondance

Van Morrison

(1970)

Interesting note from the Discogs Database regarding the original pressing of “Moondance,” On all first pressings a mix of “Into The Mystic” which Van Morrison plays tambourine. This was Van’s preferred mix of the song, but due to a clerical error, all subsequent pressings, except a much later audiophile pressing, use a rejected version omitting the tambourine. He must have played the hell out of that tambourine!

Love - Four Sail for sale

Four Sail

Love

(1969)

In High Fidelity (2000) Rob Gordon sits behind the counter at Championship Vinyl… emotionally spent from being dumped by Laura. A young lady approaches the counter and asks… “Hey, Do you have soul?” and Rob responds, “that all depends… back row, right next to the blues.” Of course, it’s right next to the blues! We’ve all been there Rob, but some of us didn’t have Love’s “Always See Your Face” as the perfect soundtrack to our misery.

The post We Must Be In Heaven, Man! – A Guide To Summer of ’69 – Peace, Love and Music appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2LP4VU4
via IFTTT

SoLil Crate Minds: Meet Discogs Record Seller Andy of AndyGrayRecords

In our Crate Minds series, we put the spotlight on the people behind the Discogs accounts. Whether running a brick-and-mortar shop, selling from a storage space or from their living room, there is one thing all sellers have in common: An incredible passion for music. We spoke with Discogs record seller Andy Gray of AndyGrayRecords to hear his story!

What’s your name and role?
My name is Andy and I do everything! My typical working day is from about 10am till 1 or 2 am, I look after an elderly relative in between subbing/listing releases. I’m also the cook of the house, my girlfriend is the breadwinner, so I get the evening meal ready for her coming home and we have a couple of hours in front of the TV in the evening before I go back to Discogs! My Discogs username AndyGrayRecords is based on my real name and the fact I like records.

When did you start selling records on Discogs?
Since I rejoined in October 2011.

How did you get into selling records?
I’ve always sold them, right from pre-internet times. Used to swap them in school. And then when I grew up I used to advertise in Record Collector and then once the internet started I used Gemm, Amazon and Ebay. At the time there was no Discogs marketplace but I used Discogs as a resource. Then I had a few years off. I was actually doing volunteer work in an Oxfam shop and they had to close due to persistent burglary and rising insurance premiums – so for a small donation I took away their whole stock of vinyl. So I went straight to Discogs as I felt like I owed you something back.

Do you have a physical record shop, or do you sell online only? Where are you based?
No, I’m just online. I have a website although at the moment it just points to Discogs. I’m based in East Anglia. Lowestoft to be precise, which is the most easterly town in England. I’m just a mile from the coast.

Discogs record seller, Andy Gray Records' shelves of vinyl records

What is your specialty?
I’m not sure! I would probably say 7″ records – I have a constant stock of over 4,000 no matter how many I sell, I always have more to list. I try and add images and runout info to them all, and over the years have built up a good knowledge of pressing plants and mastering engineers.

What would you say is your favorite record in stock right now, and why this one?
Current favourite record is by a band called City of Thieves. I have followed them since their early days when they were called Four Wheel Drive. I know two of the band members, Ben and Jamie, who also run Teambeats: they do corporate team bonding whereby they get a bunch of people with no/little musical experience and they give them an instrument. They then teach them parts of a song and within a few hours they have them able to play the song.

And what was the most memorable item you ever sold?
Probably Avalon ‎– “Going Thru / Gypsy Secrets”. It’s not the most expensive record, but I only paid 10p for it so it represents the best value!

Can you tell us what your own record collection looks like?
I have a couple hundred LPs and a handful of singles. I had about 500 or so in my early twenties. When I left home I just had a room in a shared house, so my collection mostly stayed at my mum’s house. And then when I got married I still didn’t really have room for anymore than about 50 records. Then my mum downsized and moved and I had nowhere for my records (this was pre-internet days) so I just gave them to a friend. I wish I still had them now!

Do you have a personal holy grail record?
I don’t really have one, but I wouldn’t say no to a copy of  Keith Cross & Peter Ross ‎– “Bored Civilians”.


And your favorite Record Shop?
Sound It Out in Stockton: Great staff and they kept the flag flying when all other shops were closing.

What is the funniest thing that has happened to you when selling records?
In the UK there used to be a chain of shops called Andy’s Records…the owner was also called Andy Gray – he now runs the BGO label – so anyway he has bought records off me two or three times, he actually lives in the same county as me. He started off by selling ex-jukebox records on a market stall in the 1960s.

What would be your number one tip for buyers on Discogs?
I have several… I think the main one is to read the feedback, the seller terms and the item description. Secondly I think if you find a good seller you should stick with them, they may not always have what you want but I’m sure they’ll always have something for you and lastly don’t be afraid to buy a VG record.

And for Discogs record sellers?
Be honest. Grade as though you were the buyer. Ask yourself if you’d be happy with that grade if you had bought it if the answer is no then go down a grade. Check label images and runouts, make sure you list the exact pressing!

Anything else you’d like us to know?
I’m registered as self-employed with the taxman – my sole income comes from selling records and it mostly gets reinvested in more records. When I buy a job lot of records I have found that only 30-40% are already on Discogs, there’s so much out there that needs cataloguing!

 
Find yourself a gem from AndyGrayRecords and follow them here:
Discogs | Website | Facebook | Twitter

The post Crate Minds: Meet Discogs Record Seller Andy of AndyGrayRecords appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2qMO22V
via IFTTT

Russ Ryan First Word Records’ Aly Gillani: “Our Beats Got Soul”

Since its conception in 2003, First Word Records has grown immensely as a platform for some fantastic artists and projects, culminating in their selection as Gilles Peterson and Worldwide’s Label Of The Year award in 2019.

The London imprint turned 15 this year and arguably had its biggest year to date: The Children Of Zeus debut LP cemented their position at the helm of UK hip-hop/soul. Yasmin Lacey stormed her way to acclaim, awards, and chart success. Plus albums from Don Leisure, Eric Lau, and 14KT sent waves. Best of all for Discogs users, First Word now sells records directly through the Discogs Marketplace

The label will be at the renowned Independent Label Market’s upcoming London event, which is July 13 at Coal Drops Yard.

To those new to First Word, the label’s signature sound draws on soul and jazz while championing forward-thinking acts from across the globe. We reached out to First Word’s founder, Aly Gillani, to discuss the label’s history and where it’s going. 



Why did you start First Word Records back in 2003? 

I was managing a band called Homecut Directive and we were working toward their debut EP — at the same time I was running a weekly club night in Leeds, and it became clear that there was an amazing amount of really talented musicians and producers who had no outlet to release their music. Myself and scratch DJ Andy H from Sheffield decided to change that.

How different was the indie label landscape back then? 

We started at a really weird time. Vinyl sales were on the ropes, iTunes hadn’t fully launched (at least not for independents), and we basically had no idea what we were doing! It was tough but we learnt a lot. I think the scene today is more settled — vinyl is more popular, and streaming allows you to continually turn over income when you have a catalog like ours. But really it all comes down to how good your music is and the timing of getting it out. We’re in a moment right now where music like ours is getting a little shine, so it’s all about making the most of it.

What are some landmark moments from the label thus far? 

I think our first radio play back in 2004 on Radio One was a big one (hold tight, Trevor Nelson!) and obviously winning Gilles Peterson’s Label of the Year at the Worldwide Awards. The most satisfying thing is working with artists from the ground up and seeing them live out their dreams; Children Of Zeus being the main example of that. To go from being unsure of how a 300-run of seven-inches of theirs would sell to them performing in front of thousands of people is an amazing thing to be a small part of.

On a personal level, we know you’re an avid 45 collector. What are your top five 45s at the moment? 

Oh! Tough one! OK, I’m not gonna think about this too much as I’ll be here all day! Here goes:

Tempted – Erykah Badu & James Poyser

You Can’t Blame Me – Johnson, Hawkins, Tatum & Durr

The Power Of Same – 14KT

Got A Good Feeling – Brief Encounter

Song For My Father – Horace Silver (one of my most prized possessions!)



Is it tough both loving music and having to approach First Word as a business endeavor? 

Yeah — for sure, I’ve definitely learnt some lessons on that score. The main one which I think has changed things for the better at FW is realizing that me liking something doesn’t necessarily mean we’re the right label to release it. My music taste is very varied, but we’ve had to learn what we can and can’t do. There’s nothing worse than being unable to do the best for music or an artist that you love. Sometimes the best thing you can do for an artist is be a fan and support their music.

How can Discogs benefit First Word Records? 

I think it’s useful for us to see how resale prices on old titles are looking, which can help let us know if we need to repress. I think selling directly is going to help manage that process even more; make sure that fans are paying for records at a fair price and make sure that the artists get the maximum amount possible back for their art. 

What can we expect from First Word HQ over the next year? 

Music with soul! We’ve got releases from Children of Zeus, Kaidi Tatham, Darkhouse Family, 14KT, Quiet Dawn, Souleance, and much, much more coming. I’m really excited to share it with you all! 

Find First Word Records at Independent Label Market in London on the 13th of July, or check out their Discogs shop!

The post First Word Records’ Aly Gillani: “Our Beats Got Soul” appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2JqWlZU
via IFTTT

seancannon Discogs iOS App 2.2 Improves Discoverability And Exploration

Haven’t tried our app yet? Download the Official Discogs iOS App now!

It’s been a few months since the last big update to the Discogs iOS app, which introduced new payment and user profile functionality. Now we’re back with an even more immersive experience for power users and recent converts alike in iOS version 2.2.

Improved Discovery

With the new search page, we’ve improved the ability to explore the Discogs Database. Before you ever search for a single release, you now have the opportunity to browse trending releases in the “What’s Hot” section, as well as the most-wanted and most-collected releases among our community. And if you get a hankering for a specific genre, you can dig into those, too.

As Discogs product owner Nicole Wolf said while discussing the new feature, the goal of these features was to “remind users that Discogs is a living, breathing thing.”

Search Suggestions And Enhanced Results

The goal of improved exploration also extends to the search functionality itself for version 2.2. Now when you search for a phrase, you’re offered search suggestions similar to those on the desktop version of Discogs.

The search results page has been beefed up as well, with results now divided into release, artist, and label categories. When relevant, release results are gathered into master releases to streamline the process and keep you from wading through dozens of results that seem identical.

Speaking of master releases, you can now see all items for sale from a master release page, in case you absolutely need a copy of In The Aeroplane Over The Sea, but you don’t care whether it’s an original pressing from 1998 or the 2015 reissue.

More Improvements

In addition to the new features, several other improvements have been made to refine and enrich the user experience, from decrease launch time and improved YouTube player controls to streamlined order page access (via your app inbox) and new icons.

Download the Discogs app

Questions? Check out the App FAQs, visit discogs.com/app, or chat with us in the Discogs App Forum.

The post Discogs iOS App 2.2 Improves Discoverability And Exploration appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2YMrxbq
via IFTTT

Russ Ryan Independent Label Market: A Farmer’s Market For Music Lovers

Since its inception on Berewick Street in 2011, the Independent Label Market has hosted over 50 fairs globally, bringing together over 400 of the world’s independent record labels from London to LA, and from Berlin to Barcelona. 

In a world of online delivery and streaming services, the ILM has helped reinforce the value of community amongst independent labels, while offering fans the opportunity to buy records directly from some of their favorite labels and artists. With limited-edition presses, live DJ sets, and being able to speak to the brains behind the brands, ILM serves up a unique melting pot for music lovers — one we’re proud to support at Discogs. 

Now at their new London home of Coal Drops Yard, ILM is going from strength to strength in the UK, hosting their next market July 13. Ahead of this, Independent Label Market director Joe Daniel took some time to chat with us about all things ILM past, present, and future! 

Tell us a little about the idea behind the first ILM in 2011 and what you set out to achieve?

The idea to start with was to create a space for people who were fans of certain labels where they could meet and chat directly to the label bosses, and those who knew the records most intimately. The same idea as when you go to a farmer’s market, and the person who made the bread/cheese/cake/apple juice can tell you everything about it.

Did you ever envision that you’d be here now, and that the ILM would have this kind of impact? 

Not at all, it was only meant to be a one-off. We were lucky that the first one went well, and very quickly people got in touch from all over wanting to help us set up similar events in other places. We’ve now done over 60 markets in 10 different countries.

What’s a personal highlight of ILM for you over the years? 

We did a limited vinyl charity release of 10 records called “Vinyl For Syria.” That was really nice, a lot of great artists got involved, and The Vinyl Factory let us go all out on some beautiful gold-leaf, die-cut, hand-numbered sleeves, and heavyweight, etched, one-sided vinyl.

Independent Label Market Jamie XX

Are there any other releases dropped specifically for ILM that stand out for you?

Portishead recorded an exclusive for the market, which Jimmy Fallon gave a shout out after their performance on his show. Also XL did one single vinyl copy of a Radiohead Jamie XX remix that was auctioned off at the market. It’s not available digitally either, so there is literally just one person who has it.

With a natural growth in online sales, how important do you think it is for labels to maintain visibility at a shop-fronted level? 

I think it’s nice to keep a hand in the physical world. Creating playlists and following algorithms on your devices is a great way to discover new music, and it’s so handy to have so much catalog right there in your pocket. But one of the nice things about shopping for records is the social aspect, hanging out with your friends, or chatting to the person behind the counter. Also I think labels and fans alike enjoy creating artifacts that represent the music alongside the digital versions. It’s nice to take something home and keep it.

With London going from strength to strength, what do you see for the next eight years of ILM? 

Hopefully more of the same, in more places. It’s great to have the opportunity to support such a lot of fantastic independent labels, and give them a platform to sell the records produced by such amazing artists.

Huge thanks to Joe for taking the time out, and if you’re in London this Saturday, be sure to visit Kings Cross on July 13!

ILM Summer 2019

The post Independent Label Market: A Farmer’s Market For Music Lovers appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/2G3ZsVC
via IFTTT

Discogs Staff Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For May 2019

.content ol {padding-left:35px;} .blog_entity_review {padding: 25px 0 26px !important;}

This could very well mark Banksy’s first appearance in the number one spot of our Top 30. For reference, this appearance isn’t a record recorded or released by the famous street artists. It’s features a cover spray painted by him. Back in 2002, Röyksopp pressed an ultra-limited edition of their double-LP Melody A.M., with just 100 copies available. The Norwegian electronic duo asked Banksy to put his personal touch on every copy, hand spray painting each cover.

If you’re a Röyksopp completist with a few grand burning a hole in your pocket or a swanky speculative art collector looking to add an original Banksy to your portfolio, it’s worth the eye-popping price. For the rest of us, that original Wall Of Sound pressing will have to suffice.

Looking in the top 10 entries, you’ll see the usual rare and obscure singles — but one in particular stands out. A copy of the rarest ABBA record ever pressed landed in the number three spot. It’s a red 12-inch maxi-single recorded for manager Stig Anderson’s 50th birthday. This specific copy even had Anderson’s signature, from an event in his hometown where he signed 100 of the singles.

There are more gems in this month’s Top 30 list, but we’ll leave the rest of the exploration to you. Dig in!

  1. The Dick Morrissey Quartet - Have You Heard?

    The Dick Morrissey Quartet – Have You Heard?

    Sold for $1531.00
    Label: 77 Records
    Format: LP
    Country: UK
    Released: 1963
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Post Bop

  2. Ebba Grön - Antirock

    Ebba Grön – Antirock

    Sold for $1570.00
    Label: Efel
    Formaat: 7″, Blu
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1978
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  3. Sarah Webster Fabio - Jujus/Alchemy Of The Blues

    Sarah Webster Fabio – Jujus/Alchemy Of The Blues

    Sold for $1600.00
    Label: Folkways Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Jazz, Funk/Soul
    Styles: Poetry, Jazz-Funk

  4. John Heartsman And Circles - Music Of My Heart

    John Heartsman And Circles – Music Of My Heart

    Sold for $1600.00
    Label: Not On Label
    Format: 2xLP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Jazz, Funk/Soul, Blues
    Styles: Modern Electric Blues, Soul, Soul-Jazz

  5. Irish Coffee (2) - Irish Coffee

    Irish Coffee (2) – Irish Coffee

    Sold for $1679.00
    Label: Triangle (9)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Belgium
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hard Rock, Prog Rock

  6. David Bowie - David Bowie

    David Bowie – David Bowie

    Sold for $1700.00
    Label: Philips, Philips, Philips
    Format: LP, Album, Gat
    Country: UK
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock, Pop
    Styles: Folk Rock, Country Rock, Space Rock, Psychedelic Rock

  7. Paul Gonsalves Quartet - Boom-Jackie-Boom-Chick

    Paul Gonsalves Quartet – Boom-Jackie-Boom-Chick

    Sold for $1708.00
    Label: Vocalion (3)
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: UK
    Released: 1964
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Post Bop

  8. Gboyega Adelaja - Colourful Environment

    Gboyega Adelaja – Colourful Environment

    Sold for $1750.00
    Label: EMI
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Nigeria
    Released: 1979
    Genres: Jazz, Funk/Soul
    Styles: Afrobeat, Disco, Funk, Jazz-Funk

  9. Hank Mobley - Lee Morgan - Peckin' Time

    Hank Mobley – Lee Morgan – Peckin’ Time

    Sold for $1794.00
    Label: Blue Note
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: US
    Released: 1959
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop

  10. Paul Chambers Quintet With Donald Byrd, Cliff Jordan*, Tommy Flanagan, Elvin Jones - Paul Chambers Quintet

    Paul Chambers Quintet With Donald Byrd, Cliff Jordan*, Tommy Flanagan, Elvin Jones – Paul Chambers Quintet

    Sold for $1910.00
    Label: Blue Note
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: US
    Released: 1958
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop

  11. Mandy Morton And Spriguns - Magic Lady

    Mandy Morton And Spriguns – Magic Lady

    Sold for $1931.00
    Label: Banshee Records (4), Banshee Records (4)
    Format: LP, Blu
    Country: UK
    Released: 1978
    Genres: Rock, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk Rock

  12. Eminem - Infinite

    Eminem – Infinite

    Sold for $1931.00
    Label: Web Entertainment
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1996
    Genres: Hip Hop
    Styles: Hardcore Hip-Hop, Boom Bap

  13. Bengt Nordström - Natural Music

    Bengt Nordström – Natural Music

    Sold for $1961.00
    Label: Bird Notes
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1968
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Free Jazz

  14. Monique (22) - If You Love Me (Show Me)/Never Let Me Go

    Monique (22) – If You Love Me (Show Me)/Never Let Me Go

    Sold for $1999.00
    Label: Maurci
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 0
    Genres: Funk/Soul
    Styles: Soul

  15. Samhain - Initium

    Samhain – Initium

    Sold for $2000.00
    Label: Plan 9
    Format: LP, Album, Whi
    Country: US
    Released: 1984
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  16. Sahib Shihab And The Danish Radio Jazz Group - Sahib Shihab And The Danish Radio Jazz Group

    Sahib Shihab And The Danish Radio Jazz Group – Sahib Shihab And The Danish Radio Jazz Group

    Sold for $2247.00
    Label: Oktav (2)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Denmark
    Released: 1965
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop, Modal, Big Band

  17. Terveet Kädet - Rock Laahausta Vastaan

    Terveet Kädet – Rock Laahausta Vastaan

    Sold for $2358.00
    Label: Ikbal
    Format: 7″, S/Sided, EP, W/Lbl
    Country: Finland
    Released: 1980
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk, Hardcore

  18. The Arnold Corns* - Moonage Daydream/Hang On To Yourself

    The Arnold Corns* – Moonage Daydream/Hang On To Yourself

    Sold for $2499.00
    Label: Philips
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: Netherlands
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: N/A

  19. Bizet*, Paris Conservatoire Orchestra*, André Cluytens - L'Arlésienne Suites 1 & 2/Carmen Suite

    Bizet*, Paris Conservatoire Orchestra*, André Cluytens – L’Arlésienne Suites 1 & 2/Carmen Suite

    Sold for $2531.00
    Label: Columbia
    Format: LP
    Country: UK
    Released: 1964
    Genres: Classical
    Styles: N/A

  20. The Search Party - Montgomery Chapel

    The Search Party – Montgomery Chapel

    Sold for $2613.00
    Label: Century Records (4)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Religious

  21. Sonny Clark - Dial

    Sonny Clark – Dial “S” For Sonny

    Sold for $2750.00
    Label: Blue Note
    Format: LP, Album, Mono
    Country: US
    Released: 1957
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Bop

  22. David Bowie/Harry Nilsson - The Jean Genie/Remember

    David Bowie/Harry Nilsson – The Jean Genie/Remember

    Sold for $2808.00
    Label: RCA
    Format: 7″, Single, Promo
    Country: Japan
    Released: 1973
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Glam

  23. Einar Iversen - Me And My Piano

    Einar Iversen – Me And My Piano

    Sold for $2840.00
    Label: NorDisc
    Format: LP
    Country: Norway
    Released: 1967
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Bop

  24. David Bowie - Memory Of A Free Festival

    David Bowie – Memory Of A Free Festival

    Sold for $2840.00
    Label: Mercury
    Format: 7″
    Country: Norway
    Released: 1970
    Genres: Pop
    Styles: N/A

  25. Candi Staton - Now You've Got The Upper Hand

    Candi Staton – Now You’ve Got The Upper Hand

    Sold for $2911.00
    Label: Unity Record Company
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Funk/Soul
    Styles: Soul

  26. The Misfits* - Cough/Cool b/w She

    The Misfits* – Cough/Cool b/w She

    Sold for $3000.00
    Label: Blank Records (11)
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  27. Led Zeppelin - Houses Of The Holy

    Led Zeppelin – Houses Of The Holy

    Sold for $3000.00
    Label: Atlantic
    Format: LP, Album, Mono, Promo
    Country: US
    Released: 1973
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hard Rock, Classic Rock

  28. ABBA - Hovas Vittne

    ABBA – Hovas Vittne

    Sold for $3879.00
    Label: Polar
    Format: 12″, Maxi, Red
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1981
    Genres: Pop
    Styles: Vocal

  29. Johnny And The Brothers Of Soul - Goodbye, Sam

    Johnny And The Brothers Of Soul – Goodbye, Sam

    Sold for $3999.00
    Label: Lifetime Recordings
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Funk/Soul
    Styles: Soul

  30. Röyksopp - Melody A.M.

    Röyksopp – Melody A.M.

    Sold for $6962.00
    Label: Wall Of Sound
    Format: 2xLP, Album, Ltd, W/Lbl
    Country: UK
    Released: 2002
    Genres: Electronic
    Styles: House, Downtempo

The post Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For May 2019 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

from Discogs Blog https://ift.tt/30ncwgM
via IFTTT

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: