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Dominique Zonyeé Best Of The Decade: Kendrick Lamar

Editor’s Note: Shining a light on the more prominent artists of the passing decade, we’ll be taking a look at the artists who made a monumental impact on the 2010s and landed several albums in our 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list in a series of pieces through the end of 2019. Kendrick Lamar‘s impact on The 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list is undeniable with three albums in the Top 15 alone! You could say, Kung-Fu Kenny won the decade.

Listen up! He has a story to tell.

You probably already know by now, Kendrick Lamar is one of the most influential and thought-provoking storytellers the hip-hop industry has seen in the last decade. With 13 Grammy Awards, three #1 albums on the Billboard 200 Chart, a game-changing Pulitzer Prize, and around 100 plus other trophies and accolades it’s safe to say that the Compton MC’s way with words is a universal language the world has grown to appreciate.

But K.Dot’s story begins way before his 2011 studio debut. The raw poeticism which ranks him among hip-hop’s elite was inspired in the heart of Compton, at home, in a quaint blue three-bedroom house at 1612 137th St, right across the street from Louisiana Fried Chicken. His childhood was filled with bike rides in the neighborhood, learning to understand the intricacies of the welfare system on walks home from school with his mom, and his adoration for the rap game. After seeing 2Pac and Dr. Dre on the set of California Love at the ripe age of eight, an artist was confirmed. 

Just eight years later, in 2003, the then 16-years Kendrick dropped his first mixtape, Youngest Head Nigga in Charge. It was only the beginning of a narrative that fans would continue to crave for years to come. Let’s take a walk down memory to look at the Grammy Award-winning rapper’s catalog thus far. 

kendrick-lamar-overly-dedicated  album cover

O(verly) D(edicated) (2014)

By the time TDE released O(verly) D(edicated), Kendrick already had the streets talking. His gully, unapologetic flow hit hard out of the gate with the opening track, ‘The Heart Pt. 2.’ Mr. Duckworth raps: “But I ain’t perfect, I ain’t seen too many churches. Or know them testament verses. You should either hear me now or go deaf. Or end up dead, die trying and know death. Might end up dead, swallow blood, swallow my breath. F—k a funeral, just make sure you pay my music respect, n——a.” More than his notable wordplay on standout tracks like “Ignorant Bliss,” K.Dot introduces his audience to variations of voices or personas that he would continue to develop and master on future projects to critical acclaim. 

kendrick-lamar-section-80 album cover

Section 80 (2011)

Before he was King Kendrick, he was Kendrick Duckworth, son of  Kenny Duckworth and Paula Oliver from Compton by way of Chicago. Rooted in humble beginnings, Section 80 is the diary all ‘80s babies who survived the crack era could relate to. A harmony of socially cognizant metaphors and transparent entendre, the album came in at No. 113 on the Billboard 200 Chart. It was well-received for Kendrick’s ability to tackle familiar hip-hop anecdotes and deliver them with a style all his own—especially when hip-hop heads were eagerly awaiting Drake’s Take Care and a debut from Jay-Z’s protege, J. Cole. With features from his Black Hippy Squad and production from long-time producer Sounwave, Kendrick showcased his penchant for embodying voices as a means of imagery, weaving listeners in and out of his lyric novel with precision and empathy. 

kendrick-lamar-good-kid-maad-city album cover

good kid, m.A.A.d city (2012)

An unforgettable time in hip-hop, Kendrick Lamar’s sophomore effort was a cinematic earful that solidified Kendrick’s status as a lyricist and profound poet. With sounds from the likes of Pharell, Jus Blaze, Digi-Phonics, Sounwave, and more, Mr. Duckworth took listeners on an introspective ride through the day and life of his own Compton upbringing. “This is a dark movie album,” K.Dot told Complex about the album. “I wanted to tap into that space where I was at in my teenage years. Everybody knows Kendrick Lamar, but he had to come from a certain place, a certain time, and certain experiences.” Derived from an alter ego, Kendrick dubbed himself, good kid, m.A.A.d city spent 365 days on the Billboard 200 Chart, peaking at the No. 2 spot. Thanks to the lead single “The Recipe” featuring Dr. Dre, the second banger “Swimming Pools (Drank)” and the Scoop DeVille produced “Poetic Justice” the effort surpassed Eminem’s The Eminem Show for the longest-charting hip-hop studio album on the Billboard 200 list. The album was so well-received it inspired a lecture at a Georgia university and has been forever etched in hip-hop history as arguably one of the best albums, if not the best of 2012. 

kendrick-lamar-to-pimp-a-butterfly album cover

To Pimp A Butterfly (2014)

A year after being dubbed one of the “Hottest MCs in the Game” by MTV, Kendrick released his third album, another masterpiece garnering a whopping 11 Grammy nominations at the 58th Grammy Awards. Inspired by a trip to Africa, a sentimental visit to Nelson Mandela’s jail cell on Robben Island, and soundtracks of his youth from Sly Stone, Donald Byrd, and Miles Davis, Kendrick poured his heart into another strategically socially conscious delivery.

Over progressive jazz rhythms courtesy of productions from Sounwave, Flying Lotus, Terrace Martin, LoveDragon, Thundercat, Rahki, Pharrell Williams, Boi-1da, Knxwledge, and more, the skilled introvert peeled back layers of oppression in the African-American and made the world listen. To Pimp A Butterfly would mark Kendrick’s first No. 1 album and boast five chart-topping singles, including “i”, “The Blacker the Berry”, “King Kunta,” “Alright” and “These Walls.” 

kendrick-lamar-untitled-unmastered album cover

Untitled Unmastered (2016)

On the heels of the success of his third album, Kendrick surprised fans with an eight-track, 35-minute compilation and his third No. 1 album. Curating unreleased demos was another fruit of Kendrick and TDE’s genius that engaged fans on a personal level with behind the scenes sonic auditory of the making of To Pimp A Butterfly. Drawing listeners back into his jazz-funk lair Untitled Unmastered, just reminded us all why To Pimp A Butterfly was an immediate classic. 

kendrick-lamar-damn album cover

DAMN. (2017)

Kendrick’s fifth solo studio effort and fourth No. 1 album is his most decorated global success. Ever experimental, but always authentic, Kendrick stepped into his trap-thought on the Mike Will Made-It produced single “HUMBLE.” then he made us nostalgic for his Poetic Justice days with the romantic bop “LOYALTY.” featuring Rihanna. On this album, Kenny also gave fans deeper insight into how his dad, “Ducky,” met Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith while working the drive-thru at KFC. “Crooked cops told Anthony he should kick it/He brushed them off and walked back/To the Kentucky Fried Chicken/See at this chicken spot/There was a light-skinned nigga that talked a lot/ With a curly top and a gap in his teeth/ He worked the window, his name was Ducky,” Kendrick rhymes on the closing track “DUCKWORTH.” Storytelling is his thing, and who doesn’t enjoy storytime?

A rapper rarely drops an entire album jam-packed with hits, but a year after it’s release, all 14-tracks on DAMN. were certified platinum, meaning each moved 1 million units in the United States. Even rarer, the album won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Music, becoming the first hip-hop record to win the award.

kendrick-lamar-black-panther-ost album cover

Black Panther: The Album (2018)

If Kendrick created to T.P.A.B. following an inspirational trip to Africa, then Black Panther: The Album was his much-needed return to the motherland. Produced and curated by Kendrick Lamar and Top Dawg, the soundtrack to Black Panther, a Marvel superhero film written and directed by Ryan Coogler—which earned $241 million during opening weekend—debuted at the top of the Billboard 200 Chart. 

The album featured appearances from South African artists Babes Wodumo, Saudi, Sjava and Yugen Blakrok; northern Cali rapper Mozzy and Bay Area crew SOB X RBE; Atlanta’s finest Future and 2 Chainz, Travis Scott, Swae Lee of Rae Sremmurd; the British soulful songstress Jorja Smith; and pop vocalist The Weeknd. The star-studded album was another win for the house of TDE, taking home two Grammy’s for best score soundtrack for visual media and best rap performance.

 

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Raine Cardinaels-Baird Discogs Presents A Sydney Record Fair As Part Of Electronic Music Conference 2019!

We’re happy to announce that we have joined forces with Electronic Music Conference and Pioneer DJ to bring you Discogs Presents EMC Record Fair 2019!

Discogs Presents EMC Record Fair will be part of the Electronic Music Conference, on Saturday the 16th of November at the Factory Theatre, Marrickville, Sydney Australia. The Discogs Presents EMC Record Fair was launched to give something back to the city of Sydney and its music lovers with this free, family-friendly event.

the-theatre-factory-sydney-1

Factory Theatre Courtyard, Credit: Trip Advisor

It’s the perfect way to round off a week of celebrations of Electronica: Relax after a week filled with dance music and enjoy DJs from a wide variety of backgrounds including Aroha, Daniel Lupica, Merph, Sampology, Simon Caldwell, and Toni Yotzi.

We have decided to concentrate a bit more on the electronica side of things for this fair, with our team on the ground in Australia handpicking some of the finest music dealers in the land, names such as: Dorian Dobrovic, Oz Vinyljunkie, Kato, Raine Supreme, William Lemnell, Erica Olsen, Georgie Zuzack, Damien Van Der Meer, Downtown Brown, Tim Morriss and many more! Expect stalls to be filled with a wide variety of Vinyl, Cds, and cassettes featuring genres such as techno, house, drum and bass, hip-hop, disco, electro and beyond… and of course crate diggers will also be pleased to find an amazing selection of non-electronic genres ripe for sampling or just a good old listening session. Sets from some of the world’s nicest DJs, thousands of records, tapes and Cds, Sunshine and chilled drinks … Sounds like a fantastic to spend your Saturday, Don’t you agree?

the-theatre-factory-sydney-2

Factory Theatre Courtyard, Credit: Zomato

You can find more info on the Discogs Presents EMC Record Fair page.

We’re looking forward to seeing you all!

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Ben Blackwell Best Of The Decade: Jack White

Editor’s Note: Shining a light on the more prominent artists of the passing decade; we’ll be taking a look at the artists who made a monumental impact on the 2010s and landed several albums in our 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list in a series of pieces through the end of 2019. Today we’re taking a look at Jack White with four of his solo releases making the Top 200. Luckily, Third Man Record‘s Ben Blackwell was available to give us some behind-the-scene takes on a decade of Jack White… including a half-baked scheme with Third Man’s Ben Swank to cash in on some of that mailbox money!

Not bad for an indie label that started with two employees…

Third Man Records has released over 600 titles and pressed over 5 million pieces of vinyl in the past decade. Not bad for an indie label that started with two employees. While we’ve had plenty of amazing successes… from Margo Price to Sleep to Captain Beefheart…it’d be downright criminal to ignore the fact that this entire enterprise is built upon the gargantuan amounts of hard work and laser-focused creativity emanating from the founder, owner, chief prankster, Jack White. As some number-cruncher in the Discogs salt mines has determined, all FOUR of his solo releases made the “200 HOT SHIT RELEASES FROM THE PAST 3652 DAYS” list currently making the rounds on the Dark Web. To find the weird way that Al Capone, sex with bread, TOOL, and Billy Fields have to do with it all, just peep my decidedly first-person recollections below.

Blunderbuss

(2012)

“Blunderbuss” was the first record that Third Man released where I personally felt an “oh shit” moment. The supply was scarily out of whack with the demand, a precipitous jump in necessary production the likes of which we have never seen before or since. Billy Fields at WEA had given me an insightful heads-up BEFORE we started production (they having been caught unprepared for the demand on The Black KeysEl Camino” record) and said (without knowing Jack’s first solo album was in the can) “The next time you have a BIG release…you’re really going to have to increase your numbers.” Our initial press was originally set to be 35,000 copies and I very quickly knocked it up to 50k and it still wasn’t enough. The comparisons to Dylan’s “Blood on the Tracks” felt apt, a reinvigorating entry into his canon, hitting on all the previously established musical touchstones in his career while also breaking into a few new ones. Despite balloon launches and records completed in three hours time and all the other craziness we’ve concocted, “Blunderbuss” is still my favorite Jack White release. As solid as the day it was released.

Ben Swank and I concocted a half-baked scheme to try and buy the publishing rights on Jack’s cover of Little Willie John’s “I’m Shakin’” in hopes of reaping untold thousands of dollars in mechanical licensing royalties…but we ultimately got lazy and forgot about it. I later bought the domain name https://ift.tt/2O58S6y in a similar bout of “show me the money” but I think I’ve let the registration expire.

Lazaretto

(2014)

You know it’s a good album when the fact that I played drums on two songs is not even the focus of my remembrance.

Five years later, I am still absolutely astounded that we were able to make this album work. The directive from Jack was, “Let’s take all the little tricks and secrets we’ve learned in pressing vinyl over the past five years and put ALL of them into one record.” Some had been around for over a hundred years…a side playing from the inside out, parallel grooves…while others had been first implemented by us on previous Third Man releases (hiding playable grooves underneath the center labels). Others proved particularly tricky. Side B starts with the song “Just One Drink” and depending on where you drop the needle, you will get either an acoustic or electric intro to the song. This is employing the known parallel groove technology, but our one-upping it comes from having both those introductions join together for the start of the first chorus of the song. As we understood, parallel grooves meeting had only ever been done on the b-side of Tool’s “Opiate.” But apparently those joining of grooves is all a mish-mash of loud live recordings and you can’t really tell what’s going on. But trying to get the grooves to land together on a down note was, as our cutting engineer George Ingram described, “like trying to take a flying fuck at a donut. It took Ingram literally 24 hours of cutting to get to the point where the grooves worked…even though it was not perfect, it was still cool enough for us. When the LP crossed over the 100k pressed mark and the pressing plates were worn out so much so to necessitate recutting the master, well, that was scary having to replicate all these tricks, the least of which being George’s attempt to aerially fornicate with sundry pastries. To our luck, the second cut was BETTER than the first, landing exactly where it needed to. Only just now have I checked the Discogs entry to see that the variations don’t have their own listings (which kinda pisses me off as one who loves the minutiae), but maybe the community here can rectify that.

Beyond that, the struggle to get the little holographic angel to levitate above the b-side of the disc came together WAY quicker than we could have ever expected. Originally brought to our attention by Dean Blackwood as TMR collaborated with his label Revenant for our Paramount Records omnibus collections (and eventually used on the discs in Volume 2 of that collection) we didn’t even know if the hand-cut hologram process could even transfer to pressed vinyl records. I specifically remember telling Dean “Don’t worry…there’s no WAY we can figure this out in time to get it on Lazaretto.”

The main genius behind the hologram process, Tristan Duke, was deeply engrossed in all kinds of quantum scientific research and theory to try and make this happen…figuring out if you cut into a lacquer or a pressing plate (surprise! you cut into the mother!) and learning, the hard way, that permanent marker notations left on a metal mother cause the entire electroplating process to straight up RUIN the disc you thought was ready to crack the whole case wide open.

One of my fondest memories of the past ten years is when I rolled into URP to collect the first batch of hologram test pressings. I pulled the disc out of the sleeve, held it underneath the light at just the right angle and saw that beautiful, glorious, luminous angel dance…my verbatim reaction was “Holy…fucking…shit. It worked.”

I lost count at 200,000 copies pressed a few years ago, but this album is as perennial as a tulip. The best vinyl seller in Third Man history, I can’t imagine what we’d have to do to outsell this one.

The Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016

(2016)

I wholeheartedly accepted the challenge of tracking down the earliest, analog masters for all of the songs compiled here. I think this record helped change the conversation from “Jack White – ROCKER” to “Jack White – SONGWRITER” by properly highlighting the attention to craft that Jack has shown through the entirety of his career. Not just the beginning. Not just recently. With the remixes and alternate versions and previously unheard gems, I still think this collection is insanely slept on, yet the fact it makes it on this Discogs list has me thinking it may be appropriately appreciated. The White Stripes “City Lights” is a previously unreleased outtake from the “Get Behind Me Satan” sessions and not until Michel Gondry surprised the world (Jack included) with an uncommissioned video for the song did I truly understand the weight of it all. The clip brought me to tears and my 3-year-old daughter eventually singing along makes it all the more beautiful and memorable.

Boarding House Reach

(2018)

As wide a left turn Jack has ever taken in his career and it felt so invigorating. We thought it would take FOREVER for folks to discern that there were NINE different versions of the song “Get In The Mind Shaft” but I think most of them were sussed out approximately three days after release. And to finally hear LYRICS for “Over and Over and Over” which had been attempted by Jack in almost every possible way through the previous twelve years, a more bombastic riff he has not written…well, I was grateful. Add in the sublime brilliance of a Dvořák cover (via Al Capone) and I think folks are still trying to wrap their heads around this one. In twenty years time, THIS will be the Jack record the real fans claim is his best. A litmus test if there ever was one.

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Javi Gómez Martínez Press It Again, Sam! 2: 10 More Artists That Need To Be Reissued

Around a month ago I decided to be sneaky as hell and get the Discogs Community to provide us with albums in serious need of a reissue. Guess what… it’s happening again! Muuuuuaaaaaaaahahahahahahaha!

After publishing the previous blog post, a lot of you flogged the comments sections of our social media accounts and the Discogs Blog to let us know which other albums you’d like to see reissued. Which, in case you’re wondering, makes my life so much easier (thanks for that, you guys are great.) So, with a new batch of records waiting to be researched, I put on my detective costume and ventured into the Discogs Database and Marketplace to see which of those records were in serious need of a reissue.

With all the material I had, you’ll excuse me if the one you suggested is not included in this blog post, but I promise I’ve been paying close attention to all of your suggestions and, who knows, maybe we go for a third-round soon. But I know why you’re here, so I’ll shut up now and let you take a stroll around those albums you (and we) would like to see reissued.

The Crow (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) album cover

Various – The Crow (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

The Crow is one of those movies which will live forever in the realm of legends. A loooooooot of s**t went down during the filming and exhibition of the movie. Unfortunately, all the dark shenanigans surrounding the movie always end up distracting from one of the best soundtracks of the nineties. It’s complicated to think nowadays of a mainstream movie with a similar array of incredible artists in the soundtrack. If you don’t believe us, here’s some good ol’ name-dropping for you: The Cure, Stone Temple Pilots, Nine Inch Nails, Rage Against The Machine, Violent Femmes, Helmet, Pantera, and The Jesus And Mary Chain were among those artists. Actually, The Cure has been playing the original song they created for the movie, “Burn,” in their last tour and it’s quite a tune. If CD is your thing, you won’t have any trouble getting a cheap copy you can add to your Collection. Into vinyl? Well, that’s a more complicated quest, surprisingly if we take into account there’s been already a repress in 2019. Paying attention to the high demand, this record is begging for a wider re-release.

“I hear you but I can’t wait!”

Copies in our Marketplace aren’t sold for cheaper than almost $120.

Portrait Of An American Family album cover

Marilyn MansonPortrait Of An American Family

I wasn’t aware of this one (thank you again, Discogs Community.) As it happens with many of the albums I’m going to mention in this piece, there has been at least one reissue on vinyl for this debut album. There are three different reissues on vinyl from 2009, but that’s clearly not enough in a time when vinyl is set to outsell CDs for the first time in over 25 years. Fans of Marilyn Manson, unite and demand a new reissue!

“Yeah that’s cool, but what if nobody from the label reads this blog post?”

There are copies available for sale on Discogs, but be ready to spend big bucks.

Older album cover

George Michael ‎– Older

Some of you got very passionate about Older needing the reissue treatment. And you were damn right. The only vinyl version ever released has a whooping Want/Have ratio of 4.41 and it seems like the right thing to do for the fans since soon it will be the third anniversary of when the iconic artist left us.

“But what if it never happens?”

Better cross your fingers really hard, since the cheapest copy in our Marketplace goes for $399. Ouch!

The Rising album cover

Bruce SpringsteenThe Rising

2002 wasn’t exactly what you would call the hottest year for vinyl. Actually, it was one of the worst years for vinyl in history. No further explanation needed as to why The Rising by Bruce Springsteen had a limited release in this format. The explanation as to why it hasn’t been reissued yet remains a mystery though. Next year, this album by The Boss will turn 18, maybe a good opportunity for the label to give the fans what they’re asking for?

“But I’m his number 1 fan, I can’t wait any longer!”

Luckily for you, you can buy a copy if you really want to. But beware of the high prices, the cheapest copy goes for more than $275.

Lil Beethoven album cover

Sparks – Lil’ Beethoven

It’s impossible to speak about long and idiosyncratic artistic careers without mentioning Sparks. The Mael brothers have been releasing consistently great music since the early seventies. The magic part of it is that they haven’t changed a bit (and we love them for that.) While their classic catalog, including absolutely unmissable masterpieces such as Propaganda, Kimono My House, or No. 1 In Heaven usually command more attention, their whole career is full of incredible records. As a Discogs community member pointed out to us, some of their 2000’s albums deserve the reissue treatment. More specifically, their 2002 album Lil’ Beethoven could definitely do with a reissue.

“Sparks are the best! How do I get a vinyl copy of Lil’ Beethoven?”

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but currently there aren’t any copies available.

Love 2 album cover

AIR‎– Love 2

Curiously enough and for totally unrelated reasons, I crossed paths with AIR not long ago. When we published the previous blog post about albums that need a reissue, a Discogs user was quick to point out that Love 2 was worthy of a vinyl reissue. When I read that, it felt a bit weird because the last proper studio album from the French electronic duo was released in 2009. While the vinyl fever wasn’t as high as it has been in recent years, the format was already undergoing a revival. For the limited run of records, Virgin teamed up with The Vinyl Factory to release this back in 2010. However, the Have/Want ratio is now above 3.5 and the prices have skyrocketed.

“That can’t be… Alright, how much are we talking about?”

There are copies available, but none goes for less than $166.

Orbital Band album cover

The First Two Orbital Albums

Both just known as Orbital (in the nineties you didn’t have to care about SEO), these albums are unmissable classics in every Collection of electronic music lovers. For the right reasons, both records were forward-thinking and offered a glimpse of how the future of music might look. Surprisingly enough, both albums could do with a wider reissue given the duo is still active and their influence is heavily felt on new breakthrough artists such as Bicep.

“Should I lose hope?”

Not really, copies for Orbital (I) and Orbital (II) are available in our Marketplace.

Vision Creation Newsun album cover

Boredoms ‎– Vision Creation Newsun

Wait, what? Are you telling me that one of the best records of the nineties has never been pressed on vinyl? Twenty years ago this year, Boredoms single-handedly changed the rules of the game with this album. Vision Creation Newsun graciously merges almost every style within the realm of alternative music at the moment. It’s really a surprise to learn thanks to our community that both this album and Super Æ never got a proper vinyl release, we hope this can change soon.

“This can’t be true…”

It is, sorry.

I Could Live In Hope album cover

Low ‎– I Could Live In Hope

Writing this blog post has been tough so far. It’s not that I’m a fan of each and every artist mentioned here, but Low is one of my favorite bands ever. I’ve seen them live countless times since my early twenties and I absolutely always make sure to read all the interviews with them. Their music is attached to my life in ways I don’t even know how to describe. Oh yeah, am I forgetting to say that their 2018 album Double Negative kicked ass? Their debut record, I Could Live In Hope, is to many fans their favorite one. It’s considered one of the most important albums of the slowcore movement and it has aged gorgeously.

“Is there any hope?”

Yes, you can. The album was pressed for the first time in vinyl back in 2011 and there are some NM copies available in our Marketplace. But beware, the cheapest NM copy costs $199.99.

Cowby Bebop album cover

The Seatbelts ‎– Cowboy Bebop

One of the most stunning soundtracks in the history of animation is in serious need of a proper reissue. Cowboy Bebop needs little introduction. Released in 1998, the TV series amassed an instant cult status thanks to its retro-futuristic aesthetics and focusing on adult themes. But make no mistake, part of what made Cowboy Bebop so instantly iconic was the soundtrack. As it happened with a lot of music released in the late nineties, this soundtrack wasn’t even pressed on vinyl back in the day. The only time this album has been pressed on vinyl officially was 2018, but it was as part of a Blu-ray bundle that included the complete series. Clearly not ideal for all the vinyl collectors out there waiting for a chance to add this soundtrack to their Collections.

“Oh man! I miss Cowboy Bebop, how much will it be?”

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but no vinyl copies are available for sale at the moment.

John Frusciante album cover

A Career-spanning Box Set Of All The John Frusciante Oeuvre

Am I the only one who feels that John Frusciante’s solo career has been criminally overlooked? Let me be clear about this, Red Hot Chili Peppers aren’t my jam, but his solo career is something completely different. His deeply personal studio albums cover three decades of experimentation and contain some of the most beautifully crafted guitar sounds you will be able to find anywhere. Somehow, a lot of his albums are complicated (when not impossible) to find on vinyl. Can anyone put end to this injustice?

“I’m with you, soooooooo underrated!”

Some of his albums are available in vinyl for decent prices, serve yourself here.

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Morgan Enos Best Of The Decade: Lana Del Rey

Editor’s Note: Shining a light on the more prominent artists of the passing decade; we’ll be taking a look at the artists who made a monumental impact on the 2010s and landed several albums in our 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list in a series of pieces through the end of 2019. Today we’re taking a look at Lana Del Rey with Morgan Enos, who landed four records in our Best 200 with ‘Born To Die’ the only female artist in the Top 10.

Hope is a Dangerous Thing: 10 Years of Lana Del Rey.

Lana Del Rey co-wrote her signature song, “Video Games,” about a mundane detail from her own life — watching her ex-boyfriend play video games after work. “I was reflecting on the sweetness of it but also something else I was longing for at the same time,” she told NME in 2012. But when the video for the highly personal ballad reaped hundreds of millions of views, some viewers slammed her as inauthentic — a wound that Del Rey carried around for years.

“They said I looked really fake and posed, and stuff about my lips,” she told Dazed in 2011. “It just really hurt my feelings and it made me wish that I had never put it up. If they said I was a bad singer that would be one thing because I know it’s not true, but when they say, ‘Oh, look at her face, she looks so plastic…’ that, as a girl, hurts your feelings.”

Today, accusations of Del Rey being a phony — even an industry plant — come off as logically shaky at best, flat-out sexist at worst. The artist born Lizzy Grant received flak for changing her name, as if John Legend, Bruno Mars and Katy Perry didn’t do the same. “It’s the exact same person, babes. Just with a different name,” she told Dazed. “I could build a sonic world toward the way the name fell off my lips.” 

And accusations that Del Rey’s career was funded by her father, Robert Grant, were bogus: while “Video Games” took over the world, she says they were barely in contact. “We never had more money than anyone we ever knew in town,” she told The Guardian in 2014. “I don’t think he was too sure what I had been up to.”

As for music honchos pulling the strings behind the scenes, Del Rey says that’s nonsense. “My managers were struggling to describe my music to labels,” she told Dazed, before they settled on marketing her as “gangsta Nancy Sinatra,” an image she’s still stuck with. But as Interscope executive VP of A&R Larry Jackson told Spin in 2012, “The only Svengali in this thing is Lana.”

With the 2010s wrapping up, now’s a good time to cast off these aspersions and consider Del Rey on her own terms. Here’s a rundown of her six studio albums to date.

Lana Del Ray A.K.A. Lizzy Grant

(2010)

Prior to adopting her stage name, Del Rey was Lizzy Grant, singing in a tentative contralto in a T-shirt and jeans. Her debut, Lana Del Ray A.K.A. Lizzy Grant (she would later respell her name as “Rey”) was pulled offline two months after its release. While Del Rey wasn’t quite herself yet, the album lays the seeds for future greatness on torch songs like “Kill Kill” and “Oh Say Can You See,” although her baby-voiced trills on “Gramma” go to show that she was right to sing in a lower pitch from here on out.

Born To Die

(2012)

Del Rey finally emerged fully formed on Born to Die, an album of late-night croons and Hollywood strings that was “already done before any of the [fame] shit hit the fan,” as she told Pitchfork in 2017. A hip-hop-leaning production team, including Kanye West collaborator Jeff Bhasker and Eminem producer Emile Haynie, does her sound a lot of favors; “Off to the Races,” “National Anthem” and “Summertime Sadness” sound tough and womanly, not girlish. And “Video Games” remains her apex, a bittersweet ballad that could have come along in any decade. 

Ultraviolence

(2014)

Instead of lapping up the attention around “Video Games,” Del Rey was miserable. She was being strung up by critics and even targeted by computer hackers. “I never felt any of the enjoyment,” Del Rey told The Guardian in 2014. “It was bad, all of it.” Striking back at the haters, Del Rey, in her words, “doubled down” with Ultraviolence, a dark album about money, greed and abuse. She even (controversially) channeled a Carole King and Gerry Goffin song about domestic violence in “Cruel World”: “Jim told me that he hit me and it felt like a kiss.” Striking back at the online negativity, Del Rey digs in her heels on Ultraviolence, even sarcastically declaring that she “f***ed her way up to the top.”

Honeymoon

(2015)

Pivoting from both the hip-hop-accented Born to Die and the guitar-driven Ultraviolence, Honeymoon marks Del Rey’s relief from her sudden-fame hangover. “I was happy and not really feeling like the album needed to be too cathartic,” she told NME in 2015. “It felt like a good time to have fun with some elements of psychedelia and surrealism.” She also includes other authorial voices, reciting T.S. Eliot on “Burnt Norton (Interlude)” and covering “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood,” a song written for Nina Simone. While not a major departure from Born to Die or Ultraviolence, it shows her growing ability to curate 20th-century sounds and words for her own purposes.

Lust For Life

(2017)

Lust for Life’s first surprise is on the record sleeve: Del Rey isn’t brooding but beaming. “I love my records. I love them,” she told Pitchfork in 2017, clearly tired of beating herself up. “I have an internal framework that is the only thing I measure [them] by.” She’s got high-profile fans this time around, too: her fifth album is buoyed by guest appearances from Stevie Nicks, The Weeknd, Sean Ono Lennon and more. Featuring California love songs like “13 Beaches” and “Coachella – Woodstock in My Mind,” Lust for Life was another high point for Del Rey, even being nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the 2017 Grammy Awards.

Norman Fucking Rockwell!

(2019)

There’s not really any big bangers on it,” Del Rey told Bazaar in 2019 about her long-awaited album Norman Fucking Rockwell!. “It’s just day-in-the-life mood music.” Turns out she’s burying the lede: while she’s still California dreamin’ (“her cover of Sublime‘s “Doin’ Time””) and hopelessly infatuated (“Fuck It I Love You”), Rockwell carries greater conceptual weight, exploring the state of the world in 2019. Del Rey builds her vision of human nature brick by brick, excoriating a faux-artiste “man child” on the title track, quoting Robert Frost’s “nothing gold can stay” line on “Venice Bitch” and comparing herself to Sylvia Plath on “hope is a dangerous thing for a woman to have – but i have it.” Public opinion be damned, Del Rey delivered the next best American record.

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Morgan Enos Best Of The Decade: King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard

Editor’s Note: Shining a light on the more prominent artists of the passing decade; we’ll be taking a look at the artists who made a monumental impact on the 2010s and landed several albums in our 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list in a series of pieces through the end of 2019. We take a look at King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizardimpact on The 200 Best Albums Of The 2010s list is impressive with five total albums making the list. In total, they release fifteen records over the decade… incredible!

We’re In Your Mind Fuzz: 10 Years of King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard is what happens when you take a normal rock band, remove every possible stylistic barrier and crank the boyish enthusiasm to 11. “As a young band, people always tell you not to do stuff, which is kind of strange,” drummer Eric Moore told Rolling Stone in 2018. “I’ve found that just saying yes to things can be powerful,” frontman Stu Mackenzie told The Quietus the same year.

Since their 2010 formation, the Aussie rockers have said yes to almost everything that’s popped in their heads: psychedelic freakouts, country & western, an instrument called the Flying Microtonal Banana. Fearful of flooding the market, most bands release one LP a year at most; in 2017 alone, King Gizzard said “screw it” and released five. In 2019, they followed Fishing for Fishies, a Paul McCartney-style pop album, with Infest the Rat’s Nest, a thrash metal blitzkrieg worthy of Anthrax.

King Gizzard’s refusal to kowtow to anything but their own muse has earned them five albums in the Billboard Top Rock Albums chart. In a 2019 Facebook post, Phish leader Trey Anastasio called them “my favorite band.” “They’re not a jam band, but they love the act of creation, and you can feel it,” he told the New York Times Magazine the same year. That’s the sweet spot King Gizzard occupies: they’re always inventive, but they rarely noodle to the ends of the earth. Prog fans who prefer concision: get on board.

To Cap Off Their Triumphant Decade, In Which They Released 15 Studio Albums, Here’s A Rundown Of King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard’s Discography.

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard - 12 Bar Bruise album cover

12 Bar Bruise

(2012)

Before King Gizzard was a genre-smashing juggernaut, the band played tape-damaged garage punk in the vein of Ty Segall, Thee Oh Sees or Jay Reatard. Their debut 12 Bar Bruise is pummeling and promising, but slightly garden-variety; thanks to DIY labels like Burger Records and In the Red Records, bands like this grew like weeds in the early 2010s. Still, tracks like “Elbow,” “Cut Throat Boogie>” and “Bloody Ripper” are great for a quick hit of noisy fun, if not necessarily musical range.

Eyes Like The Sky

(2013)

“I love Western films. I love bad guys and I love Red Dead Redemption. Oh, and I love evil guitars.” That’s how Mackenzie put Eyes Like The Sky in a press release, and that’s what it sounds like: a Wild West gunslingers’ tale soundtracked by Ennio Morricone and Dead Man-era Neil Young. Narrated by King Gizzard keyboardist Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s father Broderick Smith and full of twangy tritones and harmonica wails, Eyes Like The Sky is the band’s successful first attempt at pastiche.

Float Along – Fill Your Lungs

(2013)

King Gizzard zoomed in on their sound with Float Along – Fill Your Lungs, an album of trippy, driving grooves. Doing another 180, the band introduces the sitar into several songs, coming across like an act of Brian Jonestown Massacre worship a la Their Satanic Majesties’ Second Request. The band was starting to grow out of this tinny production style — which does the music no favors — but Float Along drifts in the right direction.

Oddments

(2014)

Less a progression than a clarification of Float Along – Fill Your Lungs, Oddments buffs out that album’s flaws and zeros in on its strengths, updating dusty old garage rock for the 21st century. There’s still plenty of static and noise, sometimes to a fault. But with richer production, Oddments’ boneheaded Trashmen jams (“Vegemite”) Exile on Main St.-style strummers (“It’s Got Old”) and mumbled acoustic ballads (“Homeless Man in Adidas”) shine like never before.

I’m In Your Mind Fuzz

(2014)

Expanding from their own label Flightless Records, King Gizzard co-released I’m In Your Mind Fuzz on Castle Face, the record label of Thee Oh Sees’ John Dwyer. Fitting for its B-horror album art, the music adheres closely to the Goblin or Hawkwind script, only breaking the din for a few spaced-out ambient moments here and there. While not breaking new ground, the album is on the more digestible end of the King Gizzard spectrum and should appeal to fans of meat-and-potatoes psychedelia.

Quarters!

(2015)

A suite of four songs clocking in at 10:10 each, Quarters! is where all the 1960s signifying gets interesting. Opener “The River” is in 5/4, nodding to Pentangle’s “Light Flight” (and, by extension, Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five”) before weaving through tempos and moods. The rest sounds like a mishmash of 1960s and 1970s guitar music, both worshipping garage rock’s past and sending it up. Quarters! is where King Gizzard began to impress with plain old music, not just fuzz attacks.

Paper Mâché Dream Balloon

(2015)

After the four-part suite of Quarters!, King Gizzard signed to ATO Records and rethought their approach. “You can spend so much time thinking about music, and not actually doing it, and that’s bad,” Mackenzie told DIY Mag in 2015. “We started to feel like, ‘Let’s just write some songs that are just songs.’” King Gizzard sounds relaxed on Paper Mâché Dream Balloon, free to stretch their legs and mellow out: stripped-down songs like “The Bitter Boogie,” “Time = Fate” and “Paper Mâché” owe more to the Rolling Stones’ Flowers than to delay pedals and tape hiss.

Nonagon Infinity

(2016)

“During the recording of Nonagon Infinity, I broke my mind a little,” Mackenzie told The Quietus in 2018. “It was like my brain was coming through my skull at one point.” Their second album for ATO Records, Nonagon Infinity marks the point where King Gizzard comes home from Paper Mâché Dream Balloon’s pastoral vacation and returns to brain-melting psychedelia. From “Robot Stop” to “Mr. Beat” to “Road Train,” the band rarely lets up from unnervingly high-BPM motorik.

Flying Microtonal Banana

(2017)

In 2015, inspired by the Turkish bağlama, Mackenzie had a luthier friend build him a yellow guitar with extra frets, allowing quarter tones to be played rather than only half-tones. The guitar resulted in Flying Microtonal Banana, a King Gizzard album featuring the instrument of the same name front and center. Flirting with non-Western tonality could have resulted in a mess, but Banana works — Mackenzie tastefully weaves the custom guitar in and out of songs like “Melting,” “Billabong Valley” and “Doom City” to add a sun-scorched Middle Eastern vibe.

Murder Of The Universe

(2017)

After the side road of Flying Microtonal Banana, King Gizzard went full Blind Guardian or Dream Theater with Murder of the Universe, a three-movement concept album featuring, among other disreputable denizens, a cyborg, a desiccated corpse and a Balrog. (“It might not be the Balrog from Middle Earth, but he is a sort of fire demon,” Mackenzie clarified to The Observer in 2017.) You don’t need to follow the story to get swept up in Murder Of The Universe’s nerdy mythical sweep; it remains the most sweeping, daring album they ever made.

Sketches of Brunswick East (with Mild High Club)

(2017)

Taking a necessary breather from the batshit Murder Of The Universe, the band brought new blood into the room — L.A. psych-pop duo Mild High Club — and went in a jazzy direction. The resulting music wafts rather than assaults, providing a palette cleanser from string-popping mania. “Countdown,” “The Spider and Me” and “A Journey to (S)hell” only get as weird as late-period Miles Davis or Herbie Hancock, and mythical fire demons need not apply.

Polygondwanaland

(2017)

For their fourth album of 2017, King Gizzard took a different tack. “This album is free. Free as in free,” they wrote on their website. “We do not own this record. You do.” This act of generosity helped boost a fine album that otherwise sounds a bit like King Gizzard is spinning their wheels; while no track on Polygondwanaland is a failure by any means, most of its ideas and ideas had been established on earlier albums. But as an easy entrance to King Gizzard’s ever-expanding discography, it will do in a pinch.

Gumboot Soup

(2017)

One of King Gizzard’s more accessible works, Gumboot Soup unclutters the recipe and kicks up the vocals in the mix, keeping the weirdness neatly contained like Zappa or Beefheart. While the band sounds slightly exhausted from its firehose of output in 2017, sophisticated tracks like “,” “Superposition” and “I’m Sleepin’ In ” showcase maturity and restraint they didn’t have before.

Fishing for Fishies

(2019)

Described by King Gizzard as their attempt at the blues, Fishing for Fishies became something else — an offbeat pop confection. “We were trying to make this blues record, but it just kept sliding off,” Mackenzie told Dork Magazine in 2019. “Every song was its own little unique world.” On their most fully realized album to date, the band sounds like they’re working with a complete historical toolbox: “The Bird Song” channels Wild Honey-era Beach Boys, goofy rocker “The Cruel Millennial” boogies like Joe Walsh, and “This Thing” sounds like a Stevie Wonder joint. Most of all, King Gizzard sounds happy and cooperative, and for good reason: Fishing for Fishies is their psychedelic pop masterstroke… so far.

Infest the Rats’ Nest

(2019)

The band’s wildest heel-turn (and that’s saying something), Infest the Rats’ Nest throws Beatlesque pop to the birds and salutes Metallica, Kreator, Slayer, and other thrash greats. “It’s less, like, monsters and creatures,” Mackenzie told New Noise Magazine in 2019. This one is like, “We are fucked. You are fucked. You are going to hell, and hell is on the surface of Venus.” From “Planet B” to “Hell,” Infest the Rat’s Nest works because it’s respectful, paying homage to 1980s riffage without making fun of it. A matter of months after Fishing for Fishies, King Gizzard turning around an opposite album this satisfying is an achievement. Horns up.

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Kirsten Stoller Discogs Database Guidelines Now Available in Spanish

For the first time ever, the full Discogs Database Guidelines are available in Spanish!

The Discogs Database Submission Guidelines are the backbone of Discogs; the product of almost 20 years of community-driven discussion about the best way to catalog all of the music in the world.  The Database Guidelines include over 30,000 words detailing precisely how music data should be documented on Discogs. 

With over 11.5 million releases cataloged and more than 6 million artists documented on the Discogs database, our international discography continues to grow. Discogs hopes the Database Guidelines translations will better support our international community, and further aide the Discogs’ vision of building the biggest and most comprehensive music database in the world.

No one is more familiar with the lingo and complexity of music cataloging quite like Discogs database contributors. Translations for the Discogs Database Guidelines are 100% crowdsourced from the Discogs contributor community. Over a dozen Spanish contributors helped with the Database Guidelines translation.  A special thank you to Jevo, macaumetal, Martin_H_Unzonwaxsessions, mcymd, and Sergio_Reyes who each contributed a significant amount of time toward this translation effort.

List of top Spanish translators

The Discogs Community Translation Team is currently working to complete German translations, along with continuing to improve French and Spanish translations. If you have feedback about any Discogs translations, please let us know in the Discogs Internationalization (i18n) GroupDiscogs Community Members interested in getting involved with the translation effort can join the Discogs Community Translation Team

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Discogs Staff 2019 Summer Report & Music Highlights

Many of us in the Northern Hemisphere are already missing the lackadaisical summer days of months past. Here at the Portland Discogs office, it feels like winter rolled in a couple of months early. The fall colors peaked weeks ago and leaves can be seen drifting down the dark streets, carried by gusty winds that bring temperatures close to freezing at night. It’s little surprise that in our longing for the warm summer nights of months past that we thought to look back at the most popular and most expensive music from the season of sun.

Summer is always slower than other times of year on Discogs. We see sales dip as temperatures warm up and folks head outside to enjoy music at festivals, during road trips and at myriad other venues outside their residence. We tend to keep busy over here, testing out new projects while site traffic is snoozing. Recent experiments include design changes to the Style and Genre pages, navigation menu tweaks, a new List Explorer, consolidating the master release design and about 2 dozen other things that the product folk have either sworn me to secrecy on or were smart enough to never tell me about in the first place.

a screenshot from the new List Explorer page on Discogs

We also threw a banger of a party in New York City for Crate Diggers, bringing in Roy Ayers and Method Man & Redman for an intimate performance after an exclusive record fair. Good news if you’re from Australia and feeling jaded about all this talk of winter, you’re in luck, as we’re throwing a record fair in Sydney on November 16th. Hopefully, you’ll like it more than our Essential Australian Musicians post from a few weeks ago.

Roy Ayers are Crate Diggers by Discogs NYC in July 2019

In the season of festivals and sunlight, much of the music that made its way onto these lists has a decidedly relaxed vibe to it. Moodyman’s Sinner, Peggy Gou’s Moment EP, and Four Tet’s Anna Painting are all bonafide chillers. There are some heavy hitters in here, like the Acid-drenched tunes off of Mamosato – Volume I. We can also see that many of you were afflicted by a touch of the “Summertime Sadness”. Melancholy records, like Billie Eilish’s excellent debut album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, frequent these charts. Speaking of summertime sadness, Lana Del Ray’s Norman Fucking Rockwell! was one of the best-selling albums on Discogs this summer. Maybe it was her cover of Sublime’s “Doin’ Time”, with that quintessential high-school summer vibe of “summertime, and the livin’ is easy,” that propelled it to such heights?

There are plenty of other big names. The return of Tool after a 13-year hiatus made big waves on Discogs. Thom Yorke, frontman of Radiohead, topped the best selling new album list with his finest work since 2006’s The Eraser. And, of course, the usual culprits are on the top catalog releases chart.

Below you will find the most collected albums, most expensive purchases and most popular releases from the months of July – September 2019. Trust me, your fellow Discogians have great taste in music. Listen to some of these records and broaden your horizons as we head into winter.

Most Collected Albums

Most Expensive Items Sold

Top 20 Best Selling Release Variations

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Javi Gómez Martínez Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For September 2019

It is happening again. Yes, the same number 1 as two months ago, but for $2,078 more. And without much use of my psychic powers, I can foresee this happening more times in the future since this item doesn’t seem to stop growing in value.

I was looking for emotional shelter in our number 2 (that always works), but guess what… IT IS HAPPENING AGAIN (part 2).

Alright, I guess I’ll have to scan the rest of the chart to find some of those sweet sweet records we’ve never seen around here before. Oh! Lucky me, at number 4 we have this single by The Quarrymen. And the story attached to this unique item is quite something:

“According to various sources, among others an article published by The Guardian and written by Tom Horan in November 2012, Paul McCartney bought from John “Duff” Lowe the original acetate in 1981. The acetate was taken to Abbey Road and was restored, removing pops and clicks. A small private pressing on thick vinyl of approximately 50/55 copies was made. 20/25 10 inches 78 rpm and 25/30 7 inches 45 rpm (this listing refers to the latter). The labels were an accurate reproduction of the original, with no mention of The Quarrymen. Each pressing was then housed in a reproduction of a die-cut Parlophone sleeve. It is said that some of these copies were given to George and Ringo at Christmas”.

Another record that caught my attention instantly was number 6: Made In Rock by Solid Ground. Yes, after a good amount of Top 30s you become a lethal humanoid capable of finding records that have never been included in the list in a second. Either way, the Swedish rock band Solid Ground released this album in 1976 and judging by a whooping Want/Have ratio of 11.7, you’d figure that the price tag wouldn’t be small. Congratulations to its new lucky owner.

And before I let you scroll down to see how the list looks like this month, there’s another item that has got me all 😮. Since I’ve been navigating the wonderful world of box sets lately, this is the first time ever I’ve seen a box set released in the very same year of purchase appearing on this list. The box set causing this is Woodstock – Back To The Garden: The Definitive 50th Anniversary Archive. Sounds familiar, right? That’s because we talked about it a few months ago on the Discogs Blog. We cannot blame the new owner of this box set for paying that price, it’s the real deal.

I promised it and I’ll deliver it: this is the top 30 most expensive items sold in September 2019. Indulge in unique items and hope to see you next month:

  1. The Beatles - The Collection album cover

    The Beatles – The Collection

    Sold for $1500.00 Label: Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, EMI, Capitol Records
    Format: 14xLP, Ltd, Num, RM + Box, Comp
    Country: US
    Released: 1982
    Genres: Rock, Pop
    Styles: Beat, Rock & Roll, Pop Rock, Psychedelic Rock

  2. The Royal Jesters - Private Number / Girl I Can't Forget album cover

    The Royal Jesters – Private Number / Girl I Can’t Forget

    Sold for $1500.00 Label: Clown Records (3)
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Genres: Funk / Soul

  3. Eric Prydz - Opus album cover

    Eric Prydz – Opus

    Sold for $1518.00 Label: Virgin EMI Records
    Format: 4xLP, Album, Ltd, 180
    Country: Europe
    Released: 2016
    Genres: Electronic
    Styles: Progressive House

  4. Pink Floyd - The Dark Side Of The Moon album cover

    Pink Floyd – The Dark Side Of The Moon

    Sold for $1648.00 Label: Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, Harvest
    Format: LP, Album, Ltd, Num, RE, RM
    Country: US
    Released: 1981
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Classic Rock

  5. Osunfisan Brothers & Sisters - Yoga - Be An Enlightened Soul - Stay Young And Pure With Yoga album cover

    Osunfisan Brothers & Sisters – Yoga – Be An Enlightened Soul – Stay Young And Pure With Yoga

    Sold for $1750.00 Label: EMI
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Nigeria
    Released: 1979
    Genres: Funk / Soul, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: African, Afrobeat, Boogie, Disco, Funk

  6. Flowers - For Real album cover

    Flowers – For Real

    Sold for $1898.00 Label: LA Xpressio Records
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  7. Misfits - Walk Among Us album cover

    Misfits – Walk Among Us

    Sold for $1950.00 Label: Ruby Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1982
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  8. Perky Quinby* And Gavin Gervis - The Street And The Sea album cover

    Perky Quinby* And Gavin Gervis – The Street And The Sea

    Sold for $2000.00 Label: Simple Productions
    Format: LP, Gat
    Country: US
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk, Folk Rock

  9. Gil Bernal - James / The Dogs album cover

    Gil Bernal – James / The Dogs

    Sold for $2000.00 Label: Bumps Record Co.
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1961
    Genres: Funk / Soul, Blues
    Styles: Soul, Rhythm & Blues

  10. Oasis (2) - Columbia album cover

    Oasis (2) – Columbia

    Sold for $2060.00 Label: Creation Records
    Format: 12″, S/Sided, Ltd, Promo
    Country: UK
    Released: 1993
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Brit Pop, Indie Rock

  11. David Bowie - The Man Who Sold The World album cover

    David Bowie – The Man Who Sold The World

    Sold for $2134.00 Label: Mercury, Mercury
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Classic Rock, Glam

  12. Jay Jay Johnson* / Kai Winding / Bennie Green - Trombone By Three album cover

    Jay Jay Johnson* / Kai Winding / Bennie Green – Trombone By Three

    Sold for $2196.00 Label: Prestige
    Format: LP, Comp
    Country: US
    Released: 1957
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Bop

  13. Frank Zappa - Läther album cover

    Frank Zappa – Läther

    Sold for $2200.00 Label: Mercury
    Format: 4xLP, Album, TP
    Country: US
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Experimental

  14. Analogy - Analogy album cover

    Analogy – Analogy

    Sold for $2222.00 Label: Dischi Produzioni Ventotto, Dischi Produzioni Ventotto
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Italy
    Released: 1972
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Krautrock, Prog Rock

  15. Mad Man Jaga* - Wakabout album cover

    Mad Man Jaga* – Wakabout

    Sold for $2250.00 Label: Joromi Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Nigeria
    Released: 1978
    Genres: Funk / Soul, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Afrobeat, Funk, Highlife, African

  16. The Velvet Underground & Nico (3) - The Velvet Underground & Nico album cover

    The Velvet Underground & Nico (3) – The Velvet Underground & Nico

    Sold for $2500.00 Label: Verve Records
    Format: LP, Album, Mono, Eas
    Country: US
    Released: 1967
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Garage Rock, Art Rock, Experimental, Psychedelic Rock

  17. Various - We Moved! album cover

    Various – We Moved!

    Sold for $2564.00 Label: MPL (2)
    Format: 7″, Promo
    Country: UK
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Rock, Pop
    Styles: Pop Rock

  18. U2 - All I Want Is You album cover

    U2 – All I Want Is You

    Sold for $2696.00 Label: Festival Records
    Format: 7″, Ltd, Pur
    Country: Australia
    Released: 1989
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Pop Rock

  19. Estes Brothers - Transitions album cover

    Estes Brothers – Transitions

    Sold for $2999.00 Label: EDCOM
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Psychedelic Rock, Hard Rock

  20. Various - Woodstock - Back To The Garden: The Definitive 50th Anniversary Archive album cover

    Various – Woodstock – Back To The Garden: The Definitive 50th Anniversary Archive

    Sold for $3000.00 Label: Rhino Records (2), Cotillion
    Format: 38xCD + Blu-ray + Box, Comp, Ltd, Num
    Country: US
    Released: 2019
    Genres: Rock, Funk / Soul, Blues, Folk, World, & Country

  21. The Misfits* - Bullet album cover

    The Misfits* – Bullet

    Sold for $3000.00 Label: Plan 9
    Format: 7″, EP
    Country: US
    Released: 1978
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  22. David Bowie - Space Oddity album cover

    David Bowie – Space Oddity

    Sold for $3000.00 Label: Philips
    Format: 7″, Single, Mono
    Country: Singapore
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Classic Rock

  23. E. Williams* - Trade My Soul To The Devil / My Love Waits For Me album cover

    E. Williams* – Trade My Soul To The Devil / My Love Waits For Me

    Sold for $3101.00 Label: Jaa Dee
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1964
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  24. Ludwig van Beethoven, Milstein*, Leinsdorf* - Violin Concerto album cover

    Ludwig van Beethoven, Milstein*, Leinsdorf* – Violin Concerto

    Sold for $3111.00 Label: Columbia
    Format: LP
    Country: UK
    Released: 1962
    Genres: Classical

  25. Solid Ground (4) - Made In Rock album cover

    Solid Ground (4) – Made In Rock

    Sold for $3295.00 Label: Scam Records (2)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hard Rock

  26. Leonid Kogan, Kyril Kondrashin*, Brahms*, Philharmonia Orchestra - Brahms Violin Concerto (Concerto In D Major, Op. 77) album cover

    Leonid Kogan, Kyril Kondrashin*, Brahms*, Philharmonia Orchestra – Brahms Violin Concerto (Concerto In D Major, Op. 77)

    Sold for $3846.00 Label: Columbia
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Genres: Classical
    Styles: Romantic

  27. The Quarrymen - In Spite Of All The Danger / That'll Be The Day album cover

    The Quarrymen – In Spite Of All The Danger / That’ll Be The Day

    Sold for $5555.00 Label: Kensington (2)
    Format: 7″, RE
    Country: UK
    Released: 1981
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Rock & Roll

  28. Leaf Hound - Growers Of Mushroom album cover

    Leaf Hound – Growers Of Mushroom

    Sold for $5700.00 Label: Decca, Decca
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hard Rock

  29. The Beatles - Love Me Do album cover

    The Beatles – Love Me Do

    Sold for $9220.00 Label: Parlophone
    Format: 7″, Single, Promo
    Country: UK
    Released: 1962
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Beat

  30. Röyksopp - Melody A.M. album cover

    Röyksopp – Melody A.M.

    Sold for $10256.00 Label: Wall Of Sound
    Format: 2xLP, Album, Ltd, Num, S/Edition, W/Lbl
    Country: UK
    Released: 2002
    Genres: Electronic
    Styles: House, Downtempo

The post Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For September 2019 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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