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loquearde 10 Expensive Post Rock Records

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Talking about post rock sometimes — well, most times — feels a bit weird. As much as we love bands normally associated with post rock, it feels like the term has been overused throughout the years to categorize a lot of rock music that didn’t quite fit anywhere else. Like many good things in life, the phrase was coined by critic and writer Simon Reynolds (Energy Flash, Rip It Up And Start Again) in his review of Bark Psychosis’ debut album Hex, published in the March 1994 issue of Mojo magazine.

Since it wasn’t popularized until ’94, you could argue there were artists doing post rock before post rock as an idea existed. Confusing, right? Over the next years, it began to morph as some acts borrowed elements from krautrock, ambient, IDM, jazz, minimalism, and even metal. At this point, most bands considered part of the movement weren’t necessarily marching in lockstep when it came to their sound.

Since this list isn’t meant to be a comprehensive analysis of the genre, we don’t want to proceed without mentioning a handful of post rock bands who also deserve your attention, like Tortoise, Stereolab, Mono, Talk Talk, Deafheaven, A Silver Mt. Zion, This Will Destroy You, Do Make Say Think, Gastr Del Sol, Battles, Boris, Flying Saucer Attack.

Here are 10 post rock records you’ll need to pay for in installments:

Slint

Slint were the most important pre-post-rock bands we mentioned earlier. Considered the godfathers of the genre, the Kentucky four-piece released their second and last record Spiderland on Touch And Go in 1991 (“the year punk broke”). The album paved the way for all the everyone to come. Back in those days, they followed the not-so-unfamiliar path that other trailblazing acts had: little recognition leading to the band breaking up. It’s as unfair as it sounds.

The six-track release is one of those few perfect albums out there; spoken word, quiet-loud-quiet structures, intriguing atmospheres, minimalistic arrangements. They did it many years before those features became common in the alternative rock scene. Never listened to them before? Go for Good Morning, Captain. It’s a life-changing song.

Slint’s most expensive record

You’d probably expect the first edition of Spiderland to be the most expensive Slint record, but the box set Touch And Go released in 2014 is currently going for as much as $500. Count yourself lucky if you bought your copy five years ago!

Bark Psychosis

Bark Psychosis only released one album in 1994 (before reuniting in 2004). That record, Hex (Circa, Caroline Records), is what helped Simon Reynolds come up with the nomenclature to describe the genre. Despite their small catalog, the London group became highly influential to many that followed in their footsteps. Their abstract approach to rock music, the use of synths, and the exquisite production set them apart from most of their peers.

Music magazines back then received the record with very enthusiastic reviews. Melody Maker described Hex as “unquestionably divine” and “a gorgeously intense 50 minutes.” NME referred to the band as “nothing less than completely captivating” and called the album “a thoroughly marvelous record.”

Bark Psychosis’ most expensive record

Fire Records released the band’s second (and last) album after the 2004 reunion, Codename: Dustsucker. Copies of this LP are going for as much as 550 (about $617).

Disco Inferno

Formed in east London as a four-piece in 1989, the tale of Disco Inferno is an unsung story of many underground bands that paved the way for the industry we know nowadays. Sensing a theme here? The criminally underrated, wildly experimental D.I. Go Pop (1994, Rough Trade) is a masterpiece of twisted beauty exploring new realms of sound.

Nowadays, we’re used to all sort of sampling techniques. Back in 1994, not so much. In Sharky Water featured water samples, Starbound: All Burnt Out & Nowhere To Go sampled camera flashes and children voices, A Crash At Every Speed used plenty of car and planes noises. This album was a blueprint for modern rock music in just 33 minutes.

Disco Inferno’s most expensive record

Yes, you guessed it this time! Copies of the first edition of D.I. Go Pop are currently being sold on Discogs for as much as €598 (about $671).

Mogwai

For many music fans, post rock is synonymous of Mogwai. The Scottish band came in hot with their debut album Young Team (1997, Chemikal Underground). Six years after Slint set the standard for the genre, Mogwai picked up where they left it with this fierce, grandiose debut.

Mogwai Fear Satan, the closing track of the album, might be one of the most exhilarating sonic adventures a music fan can experience. Passing the 16 minutes mark, this song is a hell of a rollercoaster. But don’t stop at their debut. They’ve released plenty of amazing LPs and EPs afterwards, and even recorded soundtracks. Oh, and don’t forget about the beer named after them.

Mogwai’s most expensive record

Mogwai’s most expensive record on Discogs is unsurprisingly Young Team — but not the first edition. The album received the deluxe reissue treatment in 2008 and copies are going for as much as $599.99. Not bad, huh?  

Sigur Rós

In Bahman Gohbadi’s film No One Knows About Persian Cats (2009), two friends plan to create a band and then run away from Iran after being released from prison. The pair befriends a man who takes them through the Tehran underground scene. In one poignant, Ashkan mentions that his biggest dream is to go to Iceland to see Sigur Rós.

This speaks more than I can about the universal appeal of Sigur Rós, a band singing in Icelandic and with the ability to affect listeners worldwide. Just like Mogwai, they’ve been around for more than two decades with unwaning popularity.

Sigur Rós most expensive record

This box set containing three of their best albums and some juicy extras is selling for as much as €550 (about $618).

Swans

Commanded by Michael Gira, Swans has been around over 35 years in one form or another. Their style has always been hard to pigeonhole; some of their releases could be labeled as industrial, others as art rock, and most of them definitely fit within the boundaries of post rock. What remains clear throughout their body of work is how fierce and in-your-face they are. 

Swans’ most expensive record

While we could find a copy of a different release that was selling for a bit more, this limited edition box set of Love Of Life sells for as much as $450 and has higher prices than other records on average.

And So I Watch You From Afar

As I mentioned in the introduction, post rock is a very flexible genre. While some artists within the genre approach it from a minimalistic angle, bands like Neurosis, Deafheaven, and And So I Watch You From Afar are really close or even part of the metal scene.

And So I Watch You From Afar’s most expensive record

The limited edition of their 2009 eponymous record slaps hard, and it can be yours for up to €299.99 (about $337).

Earth

We’re venturing into “dronier” territory. Earth is one of those cult bands well-known int the Discogs community. Their first record, Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version (1992, Sub Pop), set the template for many atmospheric and esoteric rock albums to come. The band is still active nowadays, and they keep releasing amazing albums every few years, so don’t sleep on them!

Earth’s most expensive record

You know the catalog of a band has been properly treated when prices stay generally low. That’s the case with Earth, but we still found this promo cassette for sale for $250.

Explosions In The Sky

This Texas band has been around for 20 years now, and they have become inseparable from the genre. They’ve released some classic post rock albums, such as the earth-shattering The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place (2003, Temporary Residence Limited) and the exhilaratingly beautiful All Of A Sudden I Miss Everyone (2007, Temporary Residence Limited). You can’t go wrong with Explosions In The Sky.

Explosions In The Sky’s most expensive record

If you want to own this edition of their first album, start saving up €799 (about $898).

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

I felt like it would be apropos to wrap up this list with the Canadian collective Godspeed You! Black Emperor The’ve always been the darlings of both critics and fans. Their sheer intensity and cinematic quality are unparalleled, their album covers extremely iconic, and they are surrounded by enough mystery to always keep things interesting.

After lying dormant for almost 10 years, they returned to the stage and the studio in 2012, and delivered the sublime ‘Allelujah! Don’t Bend Ascend (Constellation).

Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s most expensive record

We already told the most expensive GY!BE release in this blog post, but there are only 33 copies of the band’s first cassette, and none has ever been sold on Discogs.

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Sean Cannon Every Sample From De La Soul’s ‘3 Feet High And Rising,’ Ranked

To celebrate the album’s 30th anniversary, Vinyl Me, Please has chosen De La Soul’s classic 3 Feet High And Rising as its Record Of The Month for March. Order the two-LP clear splatter edition now.

For a certain segment of heads, hip hop reached its zenith in 1989. That’s not because the genre grew stale or slipped out of the zeitgeist in the ensuing years. Quite the contrary. But 1989 felt like the end of an era. It was worry-free sampling’s last hurrah — and what a pre-copyright-crackdown hurrah it was, thanks to a few inventive, lush, sound-rich records!

The first of those ’89 releases to hit shelves was De La Soul’s left-field debut, 3 Feet High And Rising. The album was peculiar on many levels, which was a huge part of the appeal. De La crafted a sprawling yet cohesive album that flew in the face of rap’s usual singles-driven approach. It also eschewed the genre’s increasingly hard edge — led by breakouts from Public Enemy and N.W.A. the prior year. Instead of animus and attitude, 3 Feet… was sunshine and lollipops.

With over 60 far-flung samples and a populist slant, the eccentric album helped introduce hip hop to wider audiences and primed the pump for rap’s eventual cultural ascension. As we look back after three decades, its influence remains palpable. To celebrate that milestone and its continued vitality, we decided to rank all the samples featured on 3 Feet High And Rising with a data-driven approach.

In order to properly delineate the massive number of tracks stuffed into De La Soul’s first album, we considered two primary factors: desirability and pervasiveness. For the first category, we gathered want/have info from the Discogs Database. As the reference point for each track, we used the master release of the first single whenever possible.

A handful of songs were never released on a 45, so we used the first LP they appeared on. This made things tricky since, for example, most people didn’t buy Billy Joel’s 52nd Street to blast Stiletto over and over. Probably not, anyway. To correct for that, we adjusted the numbers of each full-length on the list to neutralize the “LP effect.”

https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/fhabk629io4e5xg7cerzjjz65/playlist/3IKLFlIyoUMsVnQc8Ddeim

Going beyond pure popularity, we weighted want/have stats to favor wantlist additions on the database. Even though only 23 users have Manzel’s Midnight Theme in their collection, 771 users want it. It might not be a “popular” release, but it is clearly a “desirable” one.

As for pervasiveness, we consulted the sample gods at WhoSampled to see how many times a track was used in another song. After all, Hey Jude is culturally ubiquitous — but this is a world where Syl Johnson, not John Lennon, could be considered more popular than Jesus.

We did our best to grab every sample we could, but there’s always a chance we missed something.The album has so many samples! Speak up if you notice any glaring omissions, and of course chime in if you think the list is all wrong and someone like the Bar-Kays got the (son of) shaft. See what I did there?

This article was produced in partnership with Vinyl Me, Please.

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Diognes_The_Fox The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of January 2019

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This list has something for everyone. Classics and new, experimental and pop, electronic and analog, fast cars — it’s all here, and if you were paying attention when some of this came out, you probably have a copy by now. The release that stands out to me here the most, other than the undefeatable Tracy Chapman, is the Glass Bead Games reissue.

Back in the day when I was scraping yard sales and dollar bins to make ends meet, I found that and another Strata East release in super clean condition at a yard sale in a big box of free records. That month I made rent. Maybe you won’t after viewing this list, though. Be cautious!

Killing Joke - Killing Joke

#2 – Killing Joke – Killing Joke

2xLP, Album, Ltd, Num, RE, Yellow & Orange Mixed

Portishead - Dummy

#11 – Portishead – Dummy

LP, Album, RE, 180 gram

Daughters - You Won't Get What You Want

#15 – Daughters – You Won’t Get What You Want

2xLP, Album, Clear w/ White Smoke “London Fog”

Queen - A Night At The Opera

#18 – Queen – A Night At The Opera

LP, Album, Embossed Gatefold

Sade - Diamond Life

#22 – Sade – Diamond Life

LP, Album, Blue Labels, Gatefold

Susumu Yokota - Acid Mt. Fuji

#26 – Susumu Yokota – Acid Mt. Fuji

2xLP, Album, RE, RM, 180g

Frank Ocean - Endless

#45 – Frank Ocean – Endless

2xLP, S/Sided, Album, Etch

Tool (2) - Lateralus

#48 – Tool (2) – Lateralus

2xLP, Album, Ltd, Pic, RE, 180 Gram

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falsepriest Celebrating International Women’s Day: Top 10 Best Selling Female Artists on Discogs

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In celebration of International Woman’s Day, we decided to do a top 10 list of most collected records from solo female musicians.

Digging through the most collected records on Discogs looking for female artists is quite a depressing exercise. With the exception of Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie of Fleetwood Mac and Nico with The Velvet Underground, the top 50 most collected albums is devoid of female artists, and features not a single solo female musician. Compiling this top 10 list took me deep into the top 500 most collected albums. 500!

Gender disparity in music has been historically problematic. When looking at the top 250 most collected albums on Discogs, male solo artists outnumber female solo artists 4:1. In what is reminiscent of the gender disparity in American politics and business, there are almost as many male solo acts with “John” in their name as there are total female solo artists represented. It’s disheartening, but trends point to a narrowing of this gap. Looking at the most collected albums produced in the 2010’s, the ratio of male to female solo artists is closer to 2:1.

Despite being sparse among the most collected albums in general, The top 10 is a pretty decent list that spans eras and genres. And there’s a twist! Of course Madonna, Kate, Janis and Patti appear, but interestingly, Lana Del Rey nudges out Joni Mitchell out of the top 10. And why the hell are PJ Harvey and Grace Jones missing from this list? That’s a travesty.

When we pulled these numbers 2 years ago, Amy Winehouse’s Back to Black was in just 21,301 Collections. That has more than doubled to 46,794 Collections. In fact, an album that is in 21,000 Collections would not even break into the top-10 this year. Despite this increase, 9 of the 10 top female solo artists remain on the list.

Honorable mentions go out to all the other women in music who totally kill it: Kim Gordon, Kim Deal, Tina Weymouth, Bilinda Butcher and Deb Googe of My Bloody Valentine, Beth GibbonsPaz Lenchantin… the list goes on. We kept it focused on solo artists for this list for clarity, but all the women in music deserve a shout out.

Who have I missed here? Which records are you spinning in celebration of International Women’s Day?

Check out the top 10 best-selling solo female artists on Discogs:

Celebrating International Women's day with Amy Winehouse's album, Back To Black

1. Amy WinehouseBack To Black
Have: 46794, Want: 18622

Celebrating International Women's Day with Madonna's album, Like A Virgin

2. MadonnaLike A Virgin
Have: 41507, Want: 19398

Celebrating International Women's Day with Carole King's album, Tapestry

3. Carole KingTapestry
Have: 39361, Want: 25468

Celebrating International Women's Day with Sade's album, Diamond Life

4. SadeDiamond Life 
Have: 36127, Want: 21249

Celebrating International Women's Day with Janis Joplin's album, Pearl

5. Janis JoplinPearl 
Have: 33087, Want: 21906

Celebrating International Women's Day with Tracy Chapman's self-titled album

6. Tracy ChapmanTracy Chapman 
Have: 32258, Want: 15140

Celebrating International Women's Day with Kate Bush album, Hounds Of Love

7. Kate BushHounds Of Love
Have: 26685, Want: 23329
The Kick Inside also deserves a mention here as a top seller.

bjork-debut

8. BjörkDebut
Have: 25443, Want: 23293
Post and Homogenic also appear among the most collected albums

Celebrating International Women's Day with Tina Turner's album, Private Dancer

9. Tina TurnerPrivate Dancer
Have: 24064, Want: 3673

Celebrating International Women's Day with Patti Smith's album, Horses

10. Patti SmithHorses
Have: 23169, Want: 26345

Celebrate International Women’s Day the right way: buy more records, and support female musicians!

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Weetzie Digging in Tokyo: Tower Records

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Yep, that’s right –  Tower Records still exists!
Not only does a Tower Records still exist in Tokyo, but it’s freaking huge.

Nine stories to be exact. Ten if you count their basement performance venue.

tower_records_shibuya

Tower Records, Shibuya is actually one of the biggest music retail outlets in the world. The nine-story shop is approximately 5,000 square meters (53,820 square feet)!

The fact that there is Tower Records in Tokyo, when most of the stores were forced to close their doors a decade ago, is due to the forces of Japanese music culture along with the history of Tower itself.

The history of Tower Records spans the globe and half a century – you can find a wealth of information online and in print, and there’s even a documentary that chronicles its rise and fall:

In fact, there is an entire Tower Archive dedicated to preserving “the spirit and history of this pioneering music store.”

tower-archives

Tower was a gathering place, a library, a barometer of cultural trends… a cultural epicenter, an extended family, a way of life and a scene unto itself.

But I’ll leave that in-depth reporting to the experts, and just give you the quick and dirty version of the rise and fall of Tower Records…

Tower Records: A mini music history lesson

The first Tower store was opened by Russell Solomon in 1960 in Sacramento, California. Solomon named his shop after his father’s drugstore, Tower Cut Rate Drug Store, which shared a building with the Tower Theater.

historic photo of first Tower Theater in Sacremento, CA circa 1960s

Tower Theater & Tower Cut Rate Drugs (photo courtesy of All Things Must Pass)

Eight years after opening Tower, Solomon expanded to a second location in San Francisco.  A few years after that, a third shop opened its doors in LA.  From there, Tower’s growth was exponential, expanding across the United States and internationally.

Russ Solomon standing in Tower Records

Russ Solomon at Tower Records (photo courtesy of All Things Must Pass)

I’m a Collector, I understand the Collector mentality.

Russ Solomon, founder of Tower Records

At its peak, Tower ran over 200 locations, spread across the US, as well as in the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, Ireland, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Argentina.

In the 1990s, Tower Records sales often exceeded $1 billion annually.

Tower’s inventory changed with the times, moving from vinyl and cassettes to CDs, DVDs, and video games. Tower was also one of the first music retailers to move online, starting TowerRecords.com in 1995.

1996 homepage of www.towerrecords.com

Screenshot of 1996 version of TowerRecords.com (from Internet Archive)

However, along with the massive expansion, there were also missteps along the way: there was that whole multi-million dollar CD price fixing fiasco in which Tower Records and several other music publishers, distributors, and retailers were found guilty of illegal agreements that lead to inflated CD prices.

But ultimately, the dooming force for Tower was simply the rapidly changing market. Tower decided to take on about $110 million in debt to help fund rapid international expansion. However, they took on this debt just as music lovers were turning to free music file sharing sites, iTunes, online shopping, and discount retailers. Even huge record stores like Tower couldn’t compete; in 2006, Tower Records filed for bankruptcy.

picture of shoppers in Tower Records Shibuya

However, by 2006, Tower Records Japan had already split off from the main company and wasn’t impacted by the bankruptcy. Tower Records Japan, which had been going strong for over 20 years, went independent from the main chain in 2002.

In 2015, Tower Records Japan operated 88 record stores across Japan.

Music in Japan: Collector State of Mind

As for brick-and-mortar record stores, Japan has been a stronghold. As the rest of the world moved from CDs to digital music to streaming, Japan never stopped buying CDs.  And buying a lot of them. Japan is consistently listed as one of the countries that spends the most on music per capita. Japan still has an estimated 6,000 music stores (the US is the largest music market by revenue in the world and has only about 1,900 music stores, Germany has around 700 stores).

According to The Recording Industry Association of Japan, as of mid-2016, CDs are still the highest-selling format in Japan.

Shibuya Crossing Evening

Japan is known around the world for their advances in electronics, robotics, and the Japanese are often early adopters of new technologies, but they have failed to embrace digital and streaming music.

Why? There are many intermingled explanations for Japan’s CD-centric music market:

  • Licensing Agreements: Streaming services have been slow to launch in Japan. Spotify has been stuck for years in licensing negotiations with music companies in Japan.  To license music for streaming, agreements need to be reached with record companies. Unlike the US, Japan doesn’t just have a few major record companies to deal with, but far more small and medium-sized record companies to negotiate with.
  • Digital Sales: Digital business is still viewed with suspicion in Japan. Even many online sales are paid for at konbini (convenience stores) or via Cash On Delivery rather than paid online via credit card.
  • Pricing Restrictions: Japan has a unique system that imposes pricing restrictions on retailers, in an effort to prevent them from waging ruthless price wars with each other. These pricing restrictions have led new CDs to have a pretty standard price of $20 or more, thus ensuring a healthy profit margin for record companies and stores.
  • Bonus Material: CDs are often packaged with bonus material. Some new releases might have a hidden concert ticket inside, for example. This leads some fans to buy multiple copies of a single release.
  • Collector State of Mind: The Japanese really seem to have a love of limited, collectible releases. Perhaps they understand what I consistently hear from music collectors: there’s just something more engaging about a non-digital music collection.  The physicality, the sound, the art, the memories, and that deeper connection to the music attracts Japanese collectors.

 

A majority of Japanese fans still like the idea of possessing and playing the physical disc.

Russ Solomon, founder of Tower Records

Tower Records Shibuya Floor Directory

Tower Records, Shibuya

No matter what the explanation, it’s clear physical music is still a huge part of Japanese culture!

Exploring the Tower Records in Shibuya was such a strange but fascinating adventure. On the first floor, dubbed the “Party” floor, different songs blasted out from each new release display.

Display advertising new music release in Tower Records Shibuya

Some displays also had listening stations, although many just had the album or an advertisement for the album on repeat, playing on speakers.

Interactive display in Tower Records Sibuya

Each featured artist with a new release had its own elaborate display.  This floor was packed with new releases and recommendations.

New release recommendations in Tower Records Shibuya

Many displays had their own screens looping a music video or advertisement for the album.

If you haven’t watched a Babymetal video, I highly recommend giving it a go. The fusing of heavy metal with J-pop is a bizarre combo, especially when paired with choreographed dancing of the three teenaged girls from a former Japanese idol girl group.

 

display for Japanse metal group Babymetal in Tower Records Shibuya

Japanese artists and bands definitely dominated the first floor, which was also packed with teens and tweens browsing, buying, and socializing.

J Soul brothers display in Tower Records Shibuya

There was an impressive number of boy bands on display.

One of many boy band displays in Tower Records Shibuya

The first floor also included some books, magazines, t-shirts…

Shirts, hats, and other music merch available on the first floor of Tower Records Shibuya

…and of course, many other music related gifts and Tower Records swag.

Tower Records branded memorabilia

However, if you are looking for vinyl, you won’t find much on the first floor.

2016-03-30-10-42-29

If you make it past the noise and chaos of the first floor, the subsequent floors aren’t nearly as rowdy. In fact, I found the endless aisles on the third floor (J-Pop, J-Indies) nearly deserted, but only because everyone was gathered on the far side of the floor where a band was setting up to play.

jpop floor at Tower Records Shibuya

Subsequent floors each had their own theme and decor that fit the style of music. After the excitement of the first floor, the seventh-floor classical section was a lovely reprieve.

7th floor featuring Classical Music at Tower Records Shibuya
All-in-all, visiting Tower Records, Shibuya was quite the experience, though I have to admit that the smaller, locally owned record stores were more my style. However, visiting this music-mega store with decades of history was a blast and got me into thinking about the future of music in Japan.

As streaming begins to gain traction in Japan, it’s likely huge stores like Tower Records will feel the pain of decreased sales. Will the Tower Records in Japan face the same fate that befell most Tower Records across the world?  Or will the Japanese love of music and culture of collecting save Tower?

Display with Michael Jackson at Tower Records
It’s hard to say what will happen, but I’m glad I had the chance to see the legacy of Tower Records live on in Japan.

As vinyl sees a revived interest across the world, perhaps we are learning what the Japanese never forgot: to truly love and appreciate physical forms of music, rather than indulge in the quick, and ultimately forgettable, fix a digital purchase provides. True music collectors need the tangible, the tactile, the artistry, and the shared experience of putting on an album.

After Tower Records announced bankruptcy, Russ Solomon was interviewed about the fall of Tower and asked about the digital downloading of music. He replied,

“You know, I get really criticized when I say this, but there’s a fad element to what’s going on with this technology. It will burn out a little bit, and people will want objects, they really will.”

His prediction of the vinyl resurgence was spot on, as we’ve seen from continuous years of strong performance for the format. Russ, who passed away in 2018, was a pioneer of music culture in the 20th century and his creation continues to be historically relevant.


Digging in Tokyo series: 

Vinyl Vacation: Digging in Tokyo 

Face Records  /  Flash Disc Ranch   / Lighthouse Records

Dessinee Shop / Best Sound Records 

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Discogs Staff Updates To The Discogs Marketplace Sales & Transaction Policy

We Have Updated Our Marketplace Sales & Transaction Policy

The goal of this update is to set our users up for success by spelling out what is required when placing an order, creating seller terms, and handling order disputes.

The updated policy is effective as of today. However, we are allowing Discogs Sellers until the end of March to make sure they are in compliance. The policy updates reflect the best practices utilized by most successful users of the Marketplace. So most likely, as a Marketplace user, you are already meeting these guidelines. With the exception of one rule we have removed from the policy, the only differences you will notice are that we have officially identified and stated what exactly is expected of Marketplace users involved in sales transactions.

Below is an explanation of what has been updated. To read the complete Sales & Transaction policy, click here. If you have any questions or feedback related to the updated Sales & Transaction policy, please post in this forum thread which will be moderated by Discogs Staff.

Sales & Transaction Policy Updates:

We are no longer prohibiting Sellers from setting a minimum order requirement

This means that sellers can now refuse to accept orders below a stated value or volume as long as they have clearly stated this requirement in their Seller Terms. Our hope is that this will encourage sellers to list more lower priced items for sale, and prevent sellers from losing time and money from processing low value orders.

We are encouraging Buyers and Sellers to use a protected payment method

We will also explain the risk involved when using a method that does not provide users a way to seek a refund or return of merchandise. We understand that in many regions, an unprotected payment method, such as bank transfer, is preferred because there are few or no associated fees. This is why we will continue to allow Buyers and Sellers to use this method of payment. We just want users to know that if there is a problem with their order and they used an unprotected payment method, the support we can provide is limited.

We are reminding Buyers and Sellers that they are required to obey all rules set by their payment provider.

This means that if you are involved in an order dispute, Discogs will expect you to follow the requirements of the provider that processed the payment. Examples of payment providers include PayPal, Discogs Payments, credit card providers and banking institutions.

We are reminding users to notify the other party of any problems with their orders before leaving feedback.

In addition, we are asking users to allow the other party four days to respond and resolve the issue before feedback is left. This prevents problems that can be easily solved from becoming more complicated. We are hoping this will also prevent instances where our feedback reviewers are required to remove otherwise valid feedback because the user did not notify the other party first.

We are highlighting the importance of providing the correct address when placing an order in the Marketplace.

Since payment providers, such as PayPal, will only provide Seller protection if the order is shipped to the address listed with the Buyer’s payment provider, Sellers may cancel an order if the Buyer’s shipping information listed in Discogs does not match what is listed with their payment provider. If a Seller cancels an order for this reason, they may request Discogs to remove order feedback.

We are listing what type of information must be included in Seller Terms.

This includes:

  • How much shipping will cost for each region the Seller agrees to ship to.
  • How many days it takes to ship an order once payment is received.
  • Any regions the Seller refuses to ship to.
  • The cost of any shipping add-ons such as tracked, signed for, insured delivery.
  • Any required shipping add-ons for items exceeding a certain price.
  • Any requirement for a minimum order amount or value.
  • Any regional sales tax the Seller is required to collect by law.
  • Information about returning and refunding items.

We are outlining order management requirements for Sellers.

Once an order is received, the Seller will update the order as follows:

  1. Seller will add the shipping charge and update the order status to “Invoice Sent” within four days of when the order is placed.
  2. Seller will update the order status to “Payment Received” within four days of when valid payment is sent.
  3. After payment has been received, the Seller will ship the order and update the order status to “Shipped” within the timeframe stated in their Seller Terms.

Of course, these requirements may be extended if the order page indicates that the Buyer and Seller mutually agree to do this.

We are providing clearer guidelines for what Buyers should do if there is a problem with their order.

In most cases, problems with orders can be resolved by either contacting the Seller or the payment provider. If as a Buyer, you are unhappy with your purchase, we ask you to do the following no later than 60 days after the order has shipped:

  • Before leaving feedback, use the order page to notify the Seller, then allow the Seller four days to respond with a proposed solution.
  • If you and the Seller cannot agree on a solution, open a dispute with your payment provider.
  • If the Seller does not respond in four days, use the Seller Not Responding feature to send a notification to the Seller.
  • If the Seller is suspended because they did not respond to a Seller Not Responding notification, you should open a dispute with your payment provider.
  • If the Seller responds, but does not provide a mutually agreeable solution, you should open a dispute with your payment provider.

Thanks for taking the time to read through these updates! Just a reminder, if you have any questions or feedback related to the updated Sales & Transaction policy, please post in this forum thread which will be moderated by Discogs Staff.

The post Updates To The Discogs Marketplace Sales & Transaction Policy appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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loquearde Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For January 2019

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2018 was quite an insane year for Discogs. Last year, both the most expensive album and the most expensive single ever were sold in the Discogs Marketplace. The trend was so clear over the last year that we even analyzed the phenomenon here.

January isn’t normally a crazy month for… well, for anything pretty much. And January 2019 isn’t the exception. Our Top 30 starts the year in quiet fashion, plenty of hard to recognize records rubbing shoulders with usual suspects such as Vashti Bunyan, Bathory, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Pet Shop Boys.

January 2019’s most expensive list includes a few obscure gems, like a nearly pristine first press of Nigerian rarity Nath & Martin Brothers – Money and a live recording of an experimental performance by Japanese instrument builder and shaman, Akio Suzuki. Luckily, that Afrobeat jam from the Martin Brothers got a well-deserved repress by Voodoo Records in 2013, which can be found for much less money on Discogs. No such luck for the Akio Suzuki release. Hey, maybe you’ll get lucky one day and find one of the 200 copies while digging. Oh, on that note, do you know about our upcoming Crate Diggers Brighton record fair? Well, if you’re around Brighton on May 11 maybe you can drop by and say hello.

This will come as no surprise to frequent readers of this series, 80’s Hardcore and Punk releases continue to sell for high prices on Discogs. Minor Threat might be one of the most consistently represented bands on these lists. Another one of their Filler 7” releases secured a spot with a sale of nearly $1,500 in January. Of note, every single version of that Filler 7” has a median sale value of more than $500. And, surprisingly enough, there are allegedly 3,000 copies of those out there in the world – so you might just want to check your early 80’s Hardcore 7” collection.

Any early Mick Stevens release is going to set you back, but the cost of his first LP, in its first sale on the site and the most expensive item sold in January, is leagues beyond anything we’ve seen for his work.

Wanna know how the full chart looks like? Scroll down to the bottom now!

  1. Bengt Nordström - Untitled

    Bengt Nordström – Untitled

    Sold for $1269.00
    Label: Bird Notes
    Format: 12″, Album, Mono
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1965
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Avant-garde Jazz

  2. The Upsetters - Good, Bad & The Upsetters

    Bengt Nordström/Sven Hessle, Bengt Nordström/Jan Wallgren – Nordström/Hessle/Wallgren

    Sold for $1269.00
    Label: Bird Notes
    Format: 12″
    Country: Sweden
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Free Jazz

  3. The Upsetters - Good, Bad & The Upsetters

    The Upsetters – Good, Bad & The Upsetters

    Sold for $1297.00
    Label: Trojan Records
    Format: LP, Album, TP, W/Lbl
    Country: UK
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Reggae
    Styles: Reggae, Roots Reggae

  4. Dynamic Corvettes - Keep Off The Grass / It's A Trap

    Dynamic Corvettes – Keep Off The Grass / It’s A Trap

    Sold for $1299.00
    Label: Ru-Jac Records
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1971
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Funk

  5. Vashti Bunyan - Just Another Diamond Day

    Vashti Bunyan – Just Another Diamond Day

    Sold for $1326.00
    Label: Philips
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: UK
    Released: 1970
    Genres: Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Folk

  6. Antidote (10) - Thou Shalt Not Kill

    Antidote (10) – Thou Shalt Not Kill

    Sold for $1352.00
    Label: Antidote Records (3)
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1983
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hardcore, Punk

  7. Plebb - Yes It Isn't It

    Plebb – Yes It Isn’t It

    Sold for $1420.00
    Label: Plebb Records
    Format: LP
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1979
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Prog Rock

  8. Sadaka - Premonition

    Sadaka – Premonition

    Sold for $1450.00
    Label: Creatic Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1982
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Jazz-Funk, Soul-Jazz

  9. The Child Molesters - (I Wanna See Some) Wholesale Murder

    The Child Molesters – (I Wanna See Some) Wholesale Murder

    Sold for $1477.00
    Label: Ace & Duce Records
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1979
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Punk

  10. Pet Shop Boys - Electric

    Pet Shop Boys – Electric

    Sold for $1477.00
    Label: The Vinyl Factory, x2 (2)
    Format: Box, Album, Ltd + 12″, Ora + 12″, Yel + 12″, Pin +
    Country: UK
    Released: 2013
    Genres: Electronic, Pop
    Styles: Synth-pop, House

  11. Minor Threat - Filler

    Minor Threat – Filler

    Sold for $1493.00
    Label: Dischord Records
    Format: 7″, EP, Red
    Country: US
    Released: 1981
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hardcore, Punk

  12. Burzum - Burzum

    Burzum – Burzum

    Sold for $1500.00
    Label: Deathlike Silence Productions
    Format: CD, Album
    Country: Norway
    Released: 1992
    Genres: Electronic, Rock
    Styles: Dark Ambient, Black Metal

  13. Floorpunch - Division One Champs

    Floorpunch – Division One Champs

    Sold for $1558.00
    Label: In My Blood Records
    Format: 7″, Num, Gol
    Country: US
    Released: 1996
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hardcore

  14. Eric Dolphy - In Europe

    Eric Dolphy – In Europe

    Sold for $1590.00
    Label: Debut Records (3)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Denmark
    Released: 1962
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Post Bop

  15. Akio Suzuki - Analapos

    Akio Suzuki – Analapos

    Sold for $1609.00
    Label: ALM Records
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Japan
    Released: 1980
    Genres: Electronic, Non-Music, Classical
    Styles: Experimental

  16. Nath & Martin Brothers* - Money

    Nath & Martin Brothers* – Money

    Sold for $1623.00
    Label: Kabana Records (2)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Nigeria
    Released: 1974
    Genres: Rock, Funk / Soul, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Afrobeat, Funk, Highlife

  17. J. R. Monterose* + The Joe Abodeely Trio - In Action

    J. R. Monterose* + The Joe Abodeely Trio – In Action

    Sold for $1650.00
    Label: Studio 4 (4)
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: US
    Released: 1964
    Genres: Jazz
    Styles: Hard Bop

  18. Pink Floyd - Pigs On The Wing

    Pink Floyd – Pigs On The Wing

    Sold for $1685.00
    Label: Harvest
    Format: 7″, Promo
    Country: France
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Prog Rock

  19. Ray Medina & The New Latin Breed - Head's Head

    Ray Medina & The New Latin Breed – Head’s Head

    Sold for $1700.00
    Label: Mares Records
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Genres: Latin
    Styles: Boogaloo

  20. Led Zeppelin - Led Zeppelin

    Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin

    Sold for $1800.00
    Label: Atlantic
    Format: LP, Album, Tur
    Country: UK
    Released: 1969
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Blues Rock, Hard Rock

  21. Psychodelic Frankie - Putting You Out Of My Life / Donna

    Psychodelic Frankie – Putting You Out Of My Life / Donna

    Sold for $1818.00
    Label: Hi-Speed Records
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Genres: Funk / Soul

  22. Motörhead - Motörhead

    Motörhead – Motörhead

    Sold for $1867.00
    Label: Chiswick Records
    Format: LP, Album, Sil
    Country: UK
    Released: 1977
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Rock & Roll

  23. Bathory - Bathory

    Bathory – Bathory

    Sold for $1893.00
    Label: Black Mark Production
    Format: LP, Album, Yel
    Country: Sweden
    Released: 1984
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Black Metal

  24. Nat Hall - You Don't Know (Just How I Feel)

    Nat Hall – You Don’t Know (Just How I Feel)

    Sold for $2000.00
    Label: Loop Records (8)
    Format: 7″
    Country: US
    Released: 1966
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Rhythm & Blues, Soul

  25. The Manish Boys - I Pity The Fool

    The Manish Boys – I Pity The Fool

    Sold for $2157.00
    Label: Parlophone
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: UK
    Released: 1965
    Genres: Rock
    Styles: Rhythm & Blues, Vocal

  26. Flash McKinley - I'll Rescue You / Milly

    Flash McKinley – I’ll Rescue You / Milly

    Sold for $2200.00
    Label: Bombay, Bombay
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1970
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  27. Piero Umiliani - La Ragazza Dalla Pelle Di Luna

    Piero Umiliani – La Ragazza Dalla Pelle Di Luna

    Sold for $2272.00
    Label: Omicron
    Format: LP
    Country: Italy
    Released: 1972
    Genres: Jazz, Stage & Screen
    Styles: Soundtrack, Easy Listening

  28. The Broadway Quintet - Amalume (Lekani Mowa)

    The Broadway Quintet – Amalume (Lekani Mowa)

    Sold for $2368.00
    Label: Zambezi
    Format: LP, Album
    Country: Zambia
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Jazz, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Soul-Jazz, Fusion, African, Modal

  29. Eddie Parker (2) - But If You Must Go

    Eddie Parker (2) – But If You Must Go

    Sold for $2400.00
    Label: MAM, Miko Records
    Format: 7″, Single
    Country: US
    Released: 1976
    Genres: Funk / Soul
    Styles: Soul

  30. Mick Stevens - See The Morning

    Mick Stevens – See The Morning

    Sold for $2873.00
    Label: Deroy
    Format: LP
    Country: UK
    Released: 1972
    Genres: Rock, Pop, Folk, World, & Country
    Styles: Psychedelic Rock, Folk, Folk Rock

The post Top 30 Most Expensive Items Sold In Discogs Marketplace For January 2019 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Discogs Staff 10 Of The Best Shoegaze Records

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Before I even begin to construct this list of musical monuments, let me just state that the music style of shoegaze is a tricky one. It’s an institution held close to many, and there are so many other influences that flit in and out of the heart and soul of the discipline that we are bound to leave something out. Choosing 10 albums from this kernel of musical history is a tough task, but trudge forth we will.

Shoegaze, like the name suggests, was born from an idea that people stare at the ground while playing this glorious wall-of-noise seeded in punk while exploring electronics and ambiance, and incorporating breathy vocals and tear-jerking melody. On paper, this is shoegaze. However, we all know it to be the definition-defying transcendent experience it is. Experimentation while remaining firmly planted in some parallel rock world exploring any mood that seems to fit in, be it the form of a drum machine, a vocal, or a fuzz pedal. A lot of elements have to come together perfectly to make it sound right, but when they do, it’s like no other sound out there.

Part of the magic of shoegaze music is experiencing it live. It’s typically very loud (those of you who have seen My Bloody Valentine will know what we’re talking about), and that wall of sound guitar sheen is impenetrable to the point where most listeners physically cannot take a step forward toward the speakers without feeling the urge to lose their lunch. Earplugs aren’t required, but you’d be smart to invest in them.

<!–My first live shoegaze concert was in 1992 when Slowdive opened for Ride. Looking back on it now it’s kind of crazy to think of these two bands playing together as they’ve both achieved legendary status, but back then it was just a few indie bands from Britain coming to town to showcase their amazing gazing abilities. They may have shyly stared at the ground for the entire show, but all I can remember about the sound is that they rocked the house to the very foundations. I’ve seen straight-up rock shows that didn’t rock this hard.–>

The recorded albums obviously have a hard edge to them, but they definitely have the more drifting, ambient periods as well. But live? It’s all about in-your-face noise. These albums have a life of their own on recorded formats, but once seen live, they enter your headspace in an entirely different fashion. It’s about the personalities of the performers on stage, and regardless of where they’re gazing, the notes that flutter from their instruments create an entire genre that only continues to gather more fans each passing year.

There will be bands left out, and we’re sure some of you will argue the validity of some these inclusions even being considered shoegaze. Any way you cut it, though, these albums are perfect in their own quirky way, more than justifying a purchase by each and every music lover out there.

10 Essential Shoegaze Albums

  1. This album is a good example of the shoegaze sound as we know it: jangly guitars, sparkly production, smooth vocals, and sharp songwriting. Released right at the beginning of entire grunge explosion, it was still not deterred by the explosion of that Seattle scene. “Whirlpool” spent weeks in the charts on both sides of the pond, and is still a great example of some of the most accessible shoegaze rock ever released. Chapterhouse followed this with an equally brilliant, and more electronic, album Blood Music a few years later, then never released another album. Even in spite of their small output, they left an indelible impression.
    Listen
  2. Like Chapterhouse before them, Lush was able to take the gazer sound and make it more palatable for massive audiences. Their hooks were irresistible, and they championed an interest in electronic music by bringing in remixers like Spooky and Drum Club which helped the genre branch out and realize its fullest potential in other musical worlds. It’s albums like this that inspired later electronic artists like Ulrich Schnauss to marry more traditional organic elements of instrumentation with newer technological advancements. In the meantime, Spooky just flat out rocked!
    Listen
  3. Go ahead and flip a coin, because that’s the only way you’re going to show any fairness in including just one Catherine Wheel album in a shoegaze list. I initially felt Ferment deserved to be here more, but after additional consternation, Chrome is a better representation of the gazer aesthetic. Singer Rob Dickinson (cousin of Iron Maiden‘s Bruce Dickinson) possessed perhaps the coolest voice of all time, and only served to sublimely compliment the brilliant guitar work and moods of the albums. Take track “Fripp” for example, which is one of the finest shoegaze songs ever: beginning at a quiet crawl and gently stirred by Dickinson’s croak until it builds into a melodic tornado of sound and emotion. “Too much is not enough” he yelled into the microphone, and we all agreed wholeheartedly.
    Listen
  4. Like Catherine Wheel, it’s tough to just include one album from this group, but this has gotta be the one. Released on Creation Records (as many great shoegaze albums were), Swervedriver had taken all the things they had learned from their first album Raise and refined their approach while extending the jams. What makes this album work a little better is the complete encapsulation you feel while listening to it, particularly on tracks like “Duress” which is eight minutes of psychedelia and guitar fuzz that still manages to end all too soon.
    Listen
  5. Never known to be shy, Richard Ashcroft later became the big-mouthed and arrogant band-ruiner he was, but before all that beamed “A Storm In Heaven”. More content to focus on the quiet subtleties, this album is significant in the pantheon of shoegaze because it made the decision to be more introspective and mellow about things instead of partaking in the flamboyancy of their later output. It’s a grand exercise in restraint from start to finish, much like a perfectly executed underplayed acting performance in that it proves there is just as much power in the quietudes if you let it evolve. Verve exercised this even more so on their singles where some of these songs were extended beyond ten minutes and allowed an even more intense experience.
    Listen
  6. Yep, I’m choosing this album. Their most popular, accessible, and visible album ever. It also happens to be their best. Where their earlier output might fall into the goth rock category somewhat, and their later output filters into the “holy shit, this ain’t so good” file, Heaven Or Las Vegas hit all the right points without a single duff moment on it. One of the most impeccably-produced albums in the genre, it drifts from one track to the next with no effort, and before you know it, 40 minutes of pure sublimity has expired. Albums in any genre don’t get much better than this.
    Listen
  7. JAMC were shoegaze before shoegaze was even shoegaze — that’s how damn shoegaze they are. This band basically invented staring down at the ground, looking annoyed with the very idea you would want to see them play, doing everything in their power to make sure zero eye-contact was made. Fortunately, they also came up with some of the most unique sounding music ever produced. Through a haze of feedback and guitar squeals, Psychocandy was able to take the ethics of punk and twist it into something new in an age when new wave was taking over the charts. It’s influence has remained over the years, and continues to be an inspiration for sad moping bastards everywhere, not to mention anyone with a keen ear for brilliant music.
    Listen
  8. You knew this was coming. Sure, their earlier albums were marvels of the new guard, but Loveless is when shit got real. Another Creation Records release, Kevin Shields utilized an obsessive ear for detail that employed loops and backward-sounding guitars that made even the most sober of listeners feel like they were entering into a timewarp. This album is on a level all its own, and will forever remain planted at the top of all-time classics because of its sonic audacity, and brutal originality.
    Listen
  9. It’s hard to think of many albums in the genre that delivered more than this one. Peerless in execution, Souvlaki managed to corral the jangled guitars and project them through an ambience not many other albums have ever been able to equal. The elements of rhythm, rock, electronics, and harmony combine to make the melodies even more endearing and lasting than the artists themselves probably thought possible. This was one of those moments where lovers of any genre could come together and appreciate a musical experience without the hassles of labels or pigeon-holing. Souvlaki sparkled and twinkled like nothing else before it, and 20-odd years after its release it sounds like it could have come out just yesterday.
    Listen
  10. The cover for this album is appropriate in a very vague way: crashing, meandering waves rolling on into infinity, forever changing and morphing into new possibilities — a great segue-way for Nowhere all things considered. Nowhere is an album that wasn’t quite accepted in a broad way upon its release, however in 2015, it’s heralded as one of the greatest ever. This is usually the sign of the public just not being ready for the advances they had heard at the time, and with a new remaster of “Nowhere” coming this month, it’s proof positive that this record has ingrained itself into the very fabric of the way rock music is heard. Each and every sound on the album is perfectly placed and pitched, every nuance and detail hidden away until repeated listens expose its importance. It’s a record that demands repeat plays, and even after the 20th listen, something births itself giving the album an entirely new meaning. Shifting, changing color, and reappearing for the ages, “Nowhere” stands as one of the great testaments of ageless music.
    Listen
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LowEnd91 Discogs Presents 24 Hours of Vinyl Record Fair

Created in 2011 in Montreal by the good folks behind the Music Is My Sanctuary website, the 24 Hours of Vinyl event has since travelled to cities like London, San Francisco, Paris, and New York, where it brings DJs, record collectors and music lovers together. Discogs is proud to present the record fair portion of the event which takes on Sunday, March 3rd during 24 Hours Of Vinyl at 1435 de Bleury, Montreal, QC from 10am to 7pm.

For 24 consecutive hours, DJs of all styles and backgrounds relay for the love of vinyl! Since its creation, the event has also been streamed online to music heads across the world.

Created in 2011 in Montreal, the 19th edition of this musical marathon will take place this year at Agora de la danse and Tangente Danse at the Wilder Building. Consisting of top quality DJs, playing strictly vinyl records, attendees will be able to live the experience in person, but anyone anywhere can watch and listen live, since the event will be broadcast continuously on the Internet and on the social networks of Music Is My Sanctuary.

24HOV presents full day centered around sharing and musical discovery. Not limited to any style, DJs will play their best selections from Jazz to Hip-Hop, Disco to Electronic music. Music lovers will recognize the quality of the performances as well as the execution of this great celebration.

Having already taken place in some of the largest international cities, 24HOV continues to attract interest around the world.

– March 2nd and 3rd, 2019 from 7pm to 7pm
– 24 of the best DJs in Montreal
– 100% Vinyl
– Live stream online for 24 hours
– Visual projections will be provided by artist BOYCOTT
– Record Fair presented by Discogs on March 3rd from 10am to 7pm
– Free Entry

* Although the online broadcast is ensured during 24 consecutive hours, please note that the room will have to close for a cleaning service between 8am and 10am on Sunday

*** DJ Lineup ***

1900-2100 Saudade
2100-2200 Stephane Lavoie
2200-2300 Glowzi
2300-2400 Aram
0000-0200 Hell in Paradise
0200-0300 Gene Tellem
0300-0400 Mightykat
0400-0500 Mike Larry
0500-0600 Tazz
0600-0800 Lis Dalton b2b Frog
0800-0900 Nico Sé
0900-1000 Seb Fauteux
1000-1100 Phil Larochelle
1100-1200 dull
1200-1300 Huile Huile
1300-1400 Ruby Jane
1400-1500 Scott C
1500-1600 Walla P
1600-1700 Christian Pronovost
1700-1800 Lexis
1800-1900 Trevor Walker (Ottawa)

24 Hours of Vinyl 2018

The post Discogs Presents 24 Hours of Vinyl Record Fair appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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