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Jeffrey Lee Puckett Hank Williams: Pictures From Life’s Other Side

Hank Williams died in the backseat of a Cadillac at age 29 on his way to a New Year’s Day show in Ohio, drunk and filled with a variety of painkillers. He had the body of a man 69 and fading, ravaged by spina bifida occulta, alcoholism, drug addiction, and a failing heart.

His genius as a songwriter and performer never failed him, however. Police officers arrived to find his body near a handful of unfinished lyrics, and at his final recording session he cut “Your Cheatin’ Heart,” a song so profoundly country that many consider it to be the very definition of the form.

Williams’ recording career was short, with an official output of only 31 singles, 30 of which charted with seven reaching No. 1. That his legacy remains so powerful is a testament to his brilliance as a writer, interpreter and undeniable charisma as a performer.

Hank Williams – Pictures From Life’s Other Side: The Man And His Music In Rare Photos And Recordings” is a quietly lavish collection from BMG that collects the entirety of Williams’ performances from his weekday radio show on WSM, which was sponsored by Mother’s Best flour.

Williams recorded 72 shows from 1951 until his death and this collection is the first to gather all of his Mother’s Best performances — 144 tracks on six CDs, each carefully restored and remastered from the original transcription discs by Michael Graves and overseen by producer Cheryl Pawelski.

It’s all Williams, with guest stars and instrumentals from his band, the Drifting Cowboys, edited out to keep it down to a bit more than seven hours of deep country, gloomy spirituals and chatty commentary from Williams even as he prepares to tear your heart out with his next song.

Equally impressive is the accompanying 272-page book that’s largely comprised of more than 200 often spectacular photos, including many that have rarely —or never — been published.

The archival quality of the photos is impressive and perhaps the most startling are a handful of color photos; the starkness of Williams’ songs and voice have always made it seem as if he actually lived in black and white. The book’s lone essay is written by Williams biographer Colin Escott, with additional writing by Scott B. Bomar and an introduction by Williams’ daughter, Jett. Ken Campanile researched and collected the photos.

This box set isn’t one that shouts at you. Its elegance stems from its handsome simplicity: A stout slipcover holds the coffee-table book, which houses the CDs. The photo used for the cover is appropriately bleak, reflecting the pain that’s at the heart of many of Williams’ best-known songs, but inside offers a more nuanced story. In most of the photos Williams is sporting a sly grin stretched across his gaunt face — he clearly had some of the devil in him, or maybe he was just drunk — but his eyes always have a haunted quality.

Not all of Williams’ hits are represented — “Settin’ the Woods on Fire” is missing, for example, and “Your Cheatin’ Heart” had yet to be released — but included is “Move It on Over,” “Lovesick Blues,” “A Mansion on the Hill,” “Cold Cold Heart,” “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” “Long Gone Lonesome Blues” and “I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still in Love with You).”

Because Williams had the freedom to play anything he wanted in addition to his hits, there are a number of spirituals which he often dedicates to elderly shut-ins listening at home. He also covers a few hits popularized by others, including a version of “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” that is the sound of pure, undiluted sorrow; it makes Willie Nelson’s version sound like a party.

Williams is one of those artists so important to his genre that he almost exists above and beyond it. Perhaps that’s because he died so young, leaving a catalog that will forever reflect only the blazing genius of his youth. “Pictures From Life’s Other Side” does him proud and any Williams completist needn’t think twice; the combination of music and photos tells a story worth hearing and seeing again and again.

Article produced in partnership with BMG

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
How about getting information on Discogs Exclusives or the Limited-Edition Radar?
Subscribe to Discogs Partner Offers for access to exclusive and limited edition vinyl, new/reissue releases, contests & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account here.
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Jeffrey Lee Puckett Hank Williams: Pictures From Life’s Other Side

Hank Williams died in the backseat of a Cadillac at age 29 on his way to a New Year’s Day show in Ohio, drunk and filled with a variety of painkillers. He had the body of a man 69 and fading, ravaged by spina bifida occulta, alcoholism, drug addiction, and a failing heart.

His genius as a songwriter and performer never failed him, however. Police officers arrived to find his body near a handful of unfinished lyrics, and at his final recording session he cut “Your Cheatin’ Heart,” a song so profoundly country that many consider it to be the very definition of the form.

Williams’ recording career was short, with an official output of only 31 singles, 30 of which charted with seven reaching No. 1. That his legacy remains so powerful is a testament to his brilliance as a writer, interpreter and undeniable charisma as a performer.

Hank Williams – Pictures From Life’s Other Side: The Man And His Music In Rare Photos And Recordings” is a quietly lavish collection from BMG that collects the entirety of Williams’ performances from his weekday radio show on WSM, which was sponsored by Mother’s Best flour.

Williams recorded 72 shows from 1951 until his death and this collection is the first to gather all of his Mother’s Best performances — 144 tracks on six CDs, each carefully restored and remastered from the original transcription discs by Michael Graves and overseen by producer Cheryl Pawelski.

It’s all Williams, with guest stars and instrumentals from his band, the Drifting Cowboys, edited out to keep it down to a bit more than seven hours of deep country, gloomy spirituals and chatty commentary from Williams even as he prepares to tear your heart out with his next song.

Equally impressive is the accompanying 272-page book that’s largely comprised of more than 200 often spectacular photos, including many that have rarely —or never — been published.

The archival quality of the photos is impressive and perhaps the most startling are a handful of color photos; the starkness of Williams’ songs and voice have always made it seem as if he actually lived in black and white. The book’s lone essay is written by Williams biographer Colin Escott, with additional writing by Scott B. Bomar and an introduction by Williams’ daughter, Jett. Ken Campanile researched and collected the photos.

This box set isn’t one that shouts at you. Its elegance stems from its handsome simplicity: A stout slipcover holds the coffee-table book, which houses the CDs. The photo used for the cover is appropriately bleak, reflecting the pain that’s at the heart of many of Williams’ best-known songs, but inside offers a more nuanced story. In most of the photos Williams is sporting a sly grin stretched across his gaunt face — he clearly had some of the devil in him, or maybe he was just drunk — but his eyes always have a haunted quality.

Not all of Williams’ hits are represented — “Settin’ the Woods on Fire” is missing, for example, and “Your Cheatin’ Heart” had yet to be released — but included is “Move It on Over,” “Lovesick Blues,” “A Mansion on the Hill,” “Cold Cold Heart,” “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” “Long Gone Lonesome Blues” and “I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still in Love with You).”

Because Williams had the freedom to play anything he wanted in addition to his hits, there are a number of spirituals which he often dedicates to elderly shut-ins listening at home. He also covers a few hits popularized by others, including a version of “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” that is the sound of pure, undiluted sorrow; it makes Willie Nelson’s version sound like a party.

Williams is one of those artists so important to his genre that he almost exists above and beyond it. Perhaps that’s because he died so young, leaving a catalog that will forever reflect only the blazing genius of his youth. “Pictures From Life’s Other Side” does him proud and any Williams completist needn’t think twice; the combination of music and photos tells a story worth hearing and seeing again and again.

Article produced in partnership with BMG

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
How about getting information on Discogs Exclusives or the Limited-Edition Radar?
Subscribe to Discogs Partner Offers for access to exclusive and limited edition vinyl, new/reissue releases, contests & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account here.
––––

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Russ Ryan “Reaching People Through Music” An Interview With The Fenner Frost Foundation & RPM Records

“Helping people grow through music” is the motto and since 2016 The Fenner Frost Foundation has done exactly that, nurturing confidence and teaching transferable skills to students with learning difficulties by running a record shop with some truly heartwarming success stories. 

We visited RPM Records a few weeks ago to get a feel of their vision and were truly overwhelmed by the sense of purpose the project installs in its students, channelling their universal love for music into practical teaching, all relating to employability.  

Alison & Sue kindly took the time out to chat about the Foundation & Shop and an overview of it’s past, present and future…

discogs-fennerfrost-1

Talk us through the beginnings of Fenner Frost Foundation, how it leads into RPM Records and what you set out to achieve.

The Fenner Frost Foundation was set up in 2016 to give adults with learning disabilities meaningful work experience. The shop, RPM, is staffed by up to 6 students a day where they can gain the skills required to access paid employment opportunities.

We set this up in response to a lack of vocational provision for people with learning disabilities post education.

discogs-fennerfrost-3

Does music (as the product format) aid teaching and guidance of your students in the shop?

All aspects of learning are covered incidentally. ICT is used to research and price our stock online using Discogs. Numeracy and money skills are learnt by serving customers (we are cash only), cashing up the takings and paying them into the bank. Our stock is categorised alphabetically, requiring our students to read the names of bands or artists before putting stock into the correct areas of the retail space.

Social isolation is common for people with learning disabilities and having a real purpose to their day boosts their confidence and sense of well-being.

How important is Discogs to your day to day operations?

Without Discogs we would struggle to accurately price our stock. It also gives the students the opportunity to sell online as well as face to face.

discogs-fennerfrost-5

How do you keep the shop stocked? 

Our shop is mostly stocked by donations from the general public. We distribute donation leaflets locally and use social media to raise awareness of our charity.

What is the most interesting item that has come in as a donation?

discogs-fennerfrost-6

Have there been many success stories of RPM “graduates” obtaining employment after their time with you?  

We are currently supporting 13 students, 2 of whom now have paid employment once a week. A further 2 are volunteering elsewhere as a direct result of the Fenner Frost Foundation.

discogs-fennerfrost-4

How is the future of RPM looking and how do you hope to grow and develop?

The future of RPM is positive. With continued support and donations of current stock we hope to encourage a greater footfall. The students particularly enjoy interacting with and serving customers and it is therefore important our stock is updated regularly.

We are currently at student capacity but, as our existing students move on, it will create spaces for new ones and the charity will thrive.

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Discogs Staff The Discogs Community Hits A New Milestone: 12 Million Releases In The Database!

It feels like just yesterday we were celebrating reaching an impressive 11 million releases in the Discogs Database and here we are again. If we sound excited it’s because we are excited. After Discogs was founded in October 2000, it took 90 months to hit the first million releases in the Database. Nowadays, music in the Database continues to grow at an incredibly fast rate. It’s all thanks to our wonderful contributors everywhere around the world.

Discogs has come a long way in terms of diversity of the music we hold in the database and the process of building it has been a structured one, always asking the community, “where to next?”. During the first few years, Discogs only allowed electronic music releases. A few years later, after consulting our forums, we decided to open the door to hip-hop. The rest is history. Today, Discogs is the website where many genres are represented and where collectors worldwide come to look for their most desired music items.

But what do 12 million releases mean when it comes to contributing? It has become increasingly complicated to find releases that aren’t in the database, especially in some countries that are among the best represented. In my own experience, assisting the live stream of From The Archive 2019, I was expecting that I would have to upload releases to the database on-the-go since the focus of those DJ sets is normally pretty obscure music. In fact, I was surprised to see how wrong I was. No matter how obscure or weird the record was (some of those were selling for high prices on Discogs,) each one of the master releases was already in the database.

While I love to keep this message optimistic, there is still a lot of work to do. Central America, South America, and Southeast Asia releases have been accelerating in the last couple of years. This has been aided by translating the site into Portuguese and Korean in 2019.

It’s really cool to see how, little by little, our database becomes a real reflection of the history of recorded music worldwide. We hope that these trends continue and that we see other countries and areas of the world gain more accurate representation over the years. You’re doing your part and we hope to be doing our part, as well. In the last year, and with the help of our community, we’ve translated all Discogs Database help documentation into French and Spanish. And of course, there are more to come!

Our commitment to all of you remains the same: to become the most comprehensive music database on Earth. Free for everyone, anytime, forever. Thanks a lot for contributing and for your continuous support. We hope to be celebrating 13 million releases before 2021. Will you help us?

Want to learn more about Discogs?
Ready to submit a new Release to Discogs?
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Diognes_The_Fox The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of November 2019

Another month, another list! There’s a lot new for this list, possibly thanks to RSD Black Friday. I’ll do my best to not report on the obvious reissues and barrel scrapings and try and focus on the odd gems here and there. The first thing that caught my eye was the use of the classic Spirograph style stock cover on that Jamiroquai remix 12″. Solid remix of a classic track. U2’s first 12″ got reissued, making it accessible to anyone who doesn’t have $600+ to spend on an OG copy. Did y’all really allow a Kenny Rogers record to make it to the list this month? Really? I’m done. Until next month, comment below.

U2 - Three album cover

#2. U2 – Three

12″, Ltd, Num, RE, 40t

Emmylou Harris - The Studio Albums 1980-83 album cover

#7. Emmylou Harris – The Studio Albums 1980-83

LP, Album, RE + LP, Album, RE + LP, Album, RE + LP

FKA Twigs - Magdalene album cover

#10. FKA Twigs – Magdalene

LP, Album, Ltd, Red

Steppenwolf - Steppenwolf album cover

#26. Steppenwolf – Steppenwolf

LP, Album, Mono, Ltd, Cle

Phish - The Story of the Ghost album cover

#28. Phish – The Story of the Ghost

2xLP, Album, Ltd, Num, RM, Red

Sault - 5 album cover

#38. Sault – 5

LP, Album, RP
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BoSound Discogs Presents: EMC Record Fair 2019 In Sydney

November saw the first of many collaborative Record Fairs to happen in Australia. To start off, we teamed up with EMC (Electronic Music Conference) and Pioneer DJ to bring you an electronica themed fair, with vendors having a strong focus on bringing the public some of the finest selections of electronica on all formats from some of the greatest collections in the country. It was definitely a great time for all involved, young and old!

To shed some light on some of the amazing music that could be found that day, we also invited some of EMC‘s key speakers and best vinyl DJ’s from Australia and abroad to have a dig and play a set from records they’d bought from the event, while the host, the one and only Kato, interviewed them throughout their sets to get their reactions on what they had discovered! We also had a screen beside the DJ booth, displaying each record’s Discogs page whilst it was being spun!


Video by George Conomos

Check the playlist of the Great DJs

Aroha

Aroha is a powerhouse DJ with an undeniable stage presence. Performing solo with an open-format musical palette or masterfully mixing tech house with world-renowned MC and singer, Tali.

Check the records she played here.

Daniel Lupica

A DJ and Record Collector from Sydney, Australia. Daniel Lupica possesses deep and diverse crates of House, Disco, Boogie and cosmic oddities from all time zones around the globe.

Check the records he played here.

Sampology

Starting off his career as a producer with an ear for sampling records, Sampology has come full circle, finding the perfect balance between sampling new sounds, field recordings, and live instrumentation.

Check the records he played here.

Merph

Merph is a genuinely passionate and sound selector based in Sydney. Merph’s taste and selections span across many genres, fuelled by her love for research and exploration.

Check the records she played here.

Simon Caldwell

Simon Caldwell is one of a handful of DJ’s whose name adds a certain integrity to an event. Playing since the early 1990’s, he keeps himself free to draw on his varied musical loves, from deep house to hip hop, or whatever else catches his ear.

Check the records he played here.

Garth Linton & Rabbit Taxi

Garth has been spinning records around Sydney for nearly 20yrs, drawing heavy influences from the late 80’s/early 90’s House Music scene in Chicago, New York & Italy. Anything soul & synth driven, you can be pretty sure it’s in his record bag.

Rabbit Taxi is both driver and passenger, navigating a smooth, hazy cruise deep into the vast universe of communal musical experience.

Record Sellers who were with us:

Damien Van Der Meer

Diggin In The Tapes

Downtown Brown

Gian Arpino

Georgie Zuzack

Jules Normington

Kato 

Listen Up Records

My Vinyl Revolution

The Vinyl Junkie

Tim Morriss

William Lemnell















Photo by Ravyna

Thank you all for stopping by and a big thanks to EMC and Pioneer DJ for their support throughout the event as well! Just in case you missed the event, check some of our sellers’ digital crates above and our upcoming events here.

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Jeffrey Lee Puckett Jeff Lynne’s From Out Of Nowhere

With a successful recent arena tour and now a new album, the Electric Light Orchestra is back in the public consciousness in a way that transcends nostalgia, although that certainly plays a role. Anyone who grew up listening to Out Of The Blue is clearly psyched to once again be living in Jeff Lynne’s world. 

From Out of Nowhere is officially credited to Jeff Lynne’s ELO, which is as redundant as it gets. For the vast majority of the band’s existence, it has belonged to Lynne; he has been the primary architect of ELO’s sound and the driving force behind its multi-platinum legacy.

With From Out of Nowhere, he and longtime member Richard Tandy have delivered textbook ELO, equal parts 1960s English pop and 1950s American rock, all of it wrapped in a lush blanket of strings and keys. It immediately reached the Top 20 in nearly a dozen countries, including the No. 1 spot in the United Kingdom.

Given Lynne’s contributions to modern pop, it’s nice that he’s enjoying another good run. He’s earned it. 

Lynne has spent nearly 60 years turning his musical obsessions into wildly popular music of his own making, along the way experiencing the kind of wish fulfillment that only a lucky few achieve.

As a child, he looked to Roy Orbison and The Beatles for inspiration, finding a kindred spirit via Orbison’s devastating odes to loneliness while reveling in the Beatles’ extraordinary abilities to craft both concise miracles of pop and epic production pieces.

As an adult, he actually worked with a reasonable facsimile of The Beatles, doing the bulk of the production work on two singles after the death of John Lennon. He was a member and producer of the Traveling Wilburys, co-starring George Harrison, and Orbison. He produced a Paul McCartney album. And a Harrison album. And one by Orbison.

In other words, he has quite literally lived his dreams. 

Lynne honed his childhood influences into a singular sound that turned the Electric Light Orchestra into a force that dominated radios worldwide throughout the 1970s and ‘80s.

That success led to Lynne joining the Traveling Wilburys, and to his duties as chief producer of Tom Petty’s Full Moon Fever and Into the Great Wide Open, by Petty and the Heartbreakers. He collaborated with McCartney, Harrison and Ringo Starr as the co-producer of Free As A Bird and Real Love, the final official Beatles singles released as part of the series of Anthology compilations.

Lynne, this pop savant in sunglasses, has been a constant in our cultural universe, to such a degree that it’s all too easy to forget the pervasive cult of his influence. There’s a Jeff Lynne sound, best experienced via ELO records loved by millions, but it also runs through music made by the most iconic of artists. That’s the definition of a life well-lived.

In Partnership With Columbia Records

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
How about getting information on Discogs Exclusives or the Limited-Edition Radar?
Subscribe to Discogs Partner Offers for access to exclusive and limited edition vinyl, new/reissue releases, contests & more.
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Javi Gómez Martínez Interview With Uwe Weigmann, The Man Behind Firestation Records

While talking to our interviewee today, one thought came to my mind: Is this the first time we have interviewed a Seller specializing in indie-pop? For those of you that read the Discogs Blog regularly, you know that Crate Minds is normally more focused on the typical Discogs dichotomy of rock and electronic music sellers. As a fan of indie-pop myself, I am thrilled to have the opportunity to introduce this Seller and his shop.

Interview with Uwe Weigmann of Firestation Records

uwe-firestation-records-2

Tell us who you are and how long you have been a Discogs user

My name is Uwe Weigmann and I’m a Seller from Berlin. My record label is called Firestation Records and you can find me on Discogs under the name popkid1983. I’ve been a Discogs user for longer than ten years now!

How did you get into selling on Discogs?

I started back in the early 1990s. Back then I was going to London by bus twice a month to spend my time on the bargain floors of record and tape exchange. I bought a lot of stuff, mostly for my collection but also for friends in Berlin. Later on, I was putting together sale lists which I sent out to a few customers or selling stuff through a friend who was running a mail-order for indie-pop back then. In 1995 I sold records at a record fair for the first time. A few years later, in 1998, I founded my own record label, Firestation Records. We specialize in indie-pop reissues and have a lot of followers in Japan. I gave up my day job in 2004 to sell records and to run the record label full time. Since June 2019 we have been running a physical record shop as well.

What is your favorite record store right now and why?

Besides our own Firestation Record shop, I would say it is The Record Store Berlin. It’s the shop with the best collection in my opinion and the most friendly and competent record store in town.

Do you have a favorite record of all-time?

I actually have three: an LP, a 12″ single and a 7″ single.

Aztec Camera - How Men Are album cover

Aztec Camera – How Men Are

Format: 12″ single

What is the most valuable item you’ve ever sold?

Indian Summer ‎– Wonderland album cover

Indian Summer ‎– Wonderland

Format: 12″ single
Price: €299,99

What does your personal collection look like?

These days it is not as big as it was back in 2005. Over the years I sold a lot of stuff from my private collection to collectors in Japan, mostly rare and obscure indie-pop records from the 1980s. I think these days my private collection still includes about 4000 LPs, about 2000 7″ singles and a few thousand CDs. I mostly collect 60s/70s and contemporary soul, UK guitar pop and sophisticated pop from 1980s-early 1990s. I am also very much into the 1970s AOR and obscure stuff from Hawaii which was released between 1970-1988.

What has been your best record find?

Last year I bought a very large collection of rare Brazilian funk, soul, samba and Latin 7″ singles from a charity shop just around the corner. it was amazing because nearly all of the stuff was unknown to me and I was surprised about the value of the items.

What is your number one tip for buyers and/or sellers on Discogs?

Always show respect for each other, everything can be solved within those boundaries.

Are you a huge fan of indie-pop?
You can buy records from Uwe’s shop here.
––––

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Steven Williams What To Do When A New Record Is Skipping

It’s one of the worst feelings for a music fan — you just put a brand new record on your turntable, and the music comes out distorted. We understand that feeling, indeed we’ve been there before. To help you solve this inconvenience we have put together this guide on what to do when a vinyl record is skipping.

Helpful Pointers

Some small pops can be caused by static, especially after removing a record from its inner plastic sleeve. But for the heavier skips, there are generally two possible culprits: the record itself or the listening setup. The more likely of the two when a new vinyl record is skipping is the setup, but we will dive into the usual causes in both categories.

One shortcut is to see if the record skips in the same place every time. If so, there is a pretty good chance that it is the vinyl. Another trick is to play the record on a different turntable, like a friend’s or one at a record shop. If the vinyl sounds good on one turntable, but not on yours, then you know to adjust your setup.

Turntable Setup

The two components of the turntable that are most likely to cause a record to skip are:

  1. Tonearm – if possible, rebalance the tonearm so that the proper weight and vertical tracking force is being applied. The process for adjustments varies by turntable type, so you will need to check the corresponding guide or find one online. Note that rebalancing a tonearm and adjusting vertical tracking force is not an option for some turntables.
  2. Stylus – Inspect the stylus, or record needle, for wear or foreign objects like dust. Be careful not to touch the stylus when inspecting it. Clean or replace the cartridge if necessary. Visit the Discogs guide to cleaning and maintaining a turntable stylus for more detailed instructions.

Lower-end turntables are generally more susceptible to skipping. In addition to having non-adjustable tonearms, they might not be capable of properly playing highly dynamic modern vinyl pressings, which we will get into a bit more below. The Discogs forum has plenty of opinions on some of the brands and turntable types that frequently cause skipping.

Environment

Your turntable could be picking up bad vibrations, man. Uneven services can exacerbate some minor issues. Perhaps your listening setup is adjacent to the laundry room? Of course, they look nice, but those wood floors can tremble with heavy footsteps.

dj using a record weight to reduce sound wave vibrations impact on a vinyl record

DJs in loud club environments will utilize a record weight to limit the vibrations of sound waves. Think about ways to limit vibration impact in your own environment. Try placing a rug or carpet underneath your setup, moving it away from walls or floors that might shake, and, at the very least, make sure the surface your turntable sits on is level.

Check the Record

As mentioned above, a brand new vinyl record is less often the culprit of playback skipping, though it is not unheard of. Let’s run through some checks to see if the vinyl might be at fault.

Warped Records

Production mistakes, though exceedingly rare, can cause a vinyl record to become warped. Heat warps records. Pressure warps records. Both of these factors can be present while the record is being stored – whether it be roasting in a hot warehouse or crushed under the weight of hundreds of other records. Oh, and of course, shipping carriers are not always known for being careful with vinyl.

The author’s slightly warped copy of Beach House – Bloom

The record doesn’t have to look like a cresting ocean wave to skip. Even the hardly noticeable warp in the image above causes significant audible disruption.

Some will argue with me on this point, but there is little you can do to fix a warped record. Trust me, if you just purchased a brand new record, your time and energy will be better spent exchanging the album for an unwarped copy. If you picked up the record from your local record store, bring the vinyl back in and request a refund or exchange. If you bought it on Discogs, or from another online retailer, reach out to the seller as soon as possible for mediation.

Dust and Debris

Is it dusty or does it have visible prints on it? Though uncommon, this could have happened in the production process. To remove dust particles, clean the record with an anti-static brush. Consider a deeper clean of the vinyl record if there are visible smudges. Remember that a few small pops, especially after removing the plastic outer wrapping and the inner plastic sleeve, can occur due to static. An anti-static brush is a useful and affordable tool for any record collector and can help with these pops.

Hot Cuts

This ties into both the setup and the record itself. We’ll get into the weeds here a bit, but this is a good topic for a new record collector to understand, even at this basic level, and can help guide the decision on whether or not to upgrade a turntable.

“Hot Cuts” are typically records that are engineered to have a wide dynamic range. This ties into the “Loudness Wars” trend in modern music, in which increasingly loud and dynamic releases have become more prevalent.

Mastering engineers are now more likely to make a mix highly-dynamic, in contrast to decades ago when a more important goal was to ensure a record played on the greatest number of setups without complications.

This is the important part for vinyl records: To physically increase dynamic range, the vinyl grooves have to be shallower to fit the amount of material on the disc. This shallowness can also occur when cutting vinyl from a master that is made for digital releases. Regardless of the cause, many lower-end turntables on the market struggle with these shallower grooves.

Note that this issue is truly a modern malaise. Mastering engineers were much less likely to cut records with excessive dynamic range before the 1990s. So if you have an older pressing in your hands, this is probably not why your record is skipping.


We hope this article has provided guidance on why your new vinyl record is skipping. Remember the two main culprits, the setup and the record, and that more often than not it is a turntable or environmental issue when it is a brand new record. When in doubt, play the record on a friend’s turntable or record shop to rule out the vinyl itself.

Interested in learning more about the basics of record collecting?
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