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jfl #morninglistening to #KennethHesketh on @paladinomusic Amazon:…

#morninglistening to #KennethHesketh on @paladinomusic
Amazon: http://a-fwd.to/1Y1gm60
in ictu oculi, knotted tongues, of time and disillusionment
review in #KlassikHeute (German)
#contemporarymusic #contemporaryclassical
#21stcenturyclassical
#classicalmusic #classicalmusiccollection #classicalcdcollection #englishclassicalmusic #liverpudlian
http://bit.ly/2W7AYkL

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Eve Libertine recites Jack Kerouac’s Sea

via The Wire: Home http://bit.ly/2R68dRQ

Eve Libertine recites Jack Kerouac’s The Sea

via The Wire: Home http://bit.ly/2FM1Kto

Freya Parr The greatest piano concertos of all time

Rating: 
0

Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 2 

The ultimate technical challenge and test of stamina for any pianist, Prokofiev 2 drives forward like a freight train, pulling out of the station gracefully, tentatively, before hammering on its way.

The opening movement’s cadenza, so densely written it’s scored on three staves, is a white-knuckle test for any pianist, while the final movement is an unstoppable force of pure energy.

It’s also incredibly beautiful, the composer perfectly balancing virtuosity and aesthetics.

Chosen by editor Oliver Condy

 

 

Khachaturian Piano Concerto 

In the creepily sinuous Andante con anima second movement of Khachaturian’s Piano Concerto, a distinctly eerie sound – like something from a horror movie – emerges from the back of the orchestra.

While this appearance of the musical saw (or, alternatively, the flexatone) gives the Armenian composer’s 1936 work a uniqueness within the concerto repertoire, there is a lot more to his Concerto than just that.

The opening movement is a riot of oriental colour and chromaticism, while the Allegro brillante finale hurls the soloist, orchestra and listeners towards a thrilling finish.

Chosen by deputy editor Jeremy Pound

 

 

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 

Beethoven’s fifth and final piano concerto blazes with majesty and energy, its three movements ranging from transcendence to triumph.

Cast in the heroic key of E flat major, this 1811 concerto is full of confidence and joy – listening to it can’t fail to lift one’s spirits.

The piece is at its most magical in the Adagio un poco mosso, a hymn-like movement in B major that seems to take us to another realm.

Chosen by managing editor Rebecca Franks

 

 

Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 2

Is there a more romantic concerto? Okay, the work is now imbued with the heady emotion of David Lean’s classic film Brief Encounter (1945) and it’s easy to see why it was chosen as the soundtrack.

It’s a musical rollercoaster of contemplation and elation–which it ably added to what might have otherwise been a bit of a staid drama.

Written while Rachmaninov was coming through a deep depression, the music does appear to render, in vivid hues, the complexities of human emotion – from the darkness of self-doubt to the intoxicating release that comes when the light is finally allowed in.

Chosen by reviews editor Michael Beek

 

 

Ravel Piano Concerto 

A whip crack. Jazz-infused melodies. A soundworld taking inspiration from Basque and Spanish music. What’s not to enjoy? Ravel’s concerto manages to achieve real emotional depth while also giving us the perfect party piece.

After the first movement, which is full of fire and fun, the second movement takes a step back and explores a much more serene landscape.

The piece ends with a final movement travelling through a series of unexpected key signatures to revisit the initial feisty atmosphere. It’s got everything you could wish for in a piano concerto. 

Chosen by editorial assistant Freya Parr

 

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jfl #morninglistening to #Fauré’s #Pénélope on @warnerclassics…

#morninglistening to #Fauré’s #Pénélope on @warnerclassics /#Erato w/@MonteCarlo_Orch under #charlesdutoit
Amazon: http://a-fwd.to/5GTTueN
#classicalmusic #chambermusic #classicalmusiccollection #classicalcdcollection #opera #GabrielFaure #JessyeNorman #JoseVanDam #Dutoit #FrenchClassicalMusic #GabrielFauré #Faure #frenchromanticism
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Freya Parr The greatest piano concertos of all time

Rating: 
0

Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 2 

The ultimate technical challenge and test of stamina for any pianist, Prokofiev 2 drives forward like a freight train, pulling out of the station gracefully, tentatively, before hammering on its way.

The opening movement’s cadenza, so densely written it’s scored on three staves, is a white-knuckle test for any pianist, while the final movement is an unstoppable force of pure energy.

It’s also incredibly beautiful, the composer perfectly balancing virtuosity and aesthetics.

Chosen by editor Oliver Condy

 

 

Khachaturian Piano Concerto 

In the creepily sinuous Andante con anima second movement of Khachaturian’s Piano Concerto, a distinctly eerie sound – like something from a horror movie – emerges from the back of the orchestra.

While this appearance of the musical saw (or, alternatively, the flexatone) gives the Armenian composer’s 1936 work a uniqueness within the concerto repertoire, there is a lot more to his Concerto than just that.

The opening movement is a riot of oriental colour and chromaticism, while the Allegro brillante finale hurls the soloist, orchestra and listeners towards a thrilling finish.

Chosen by deputy editor Jeremy Pound

 

 

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 

Beethoven’s fifth and final piano concerto blazes with majesty and energy, its three movements ranging from transcendence to triumph.

Cast in the heroic key of E flat major, this 1811 concerto is full of confidence and joy – listening to it can’t fail to lift one’s spirits.

The piece is at its most magical in the Adagio un poco mosso, a hymn-like movement in B major that seems to take us to another realm.

Chosen by managing editor Rebecca Franks

 

 

Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 2

Is there a more romantic concerto? Okay, the work is now imbued with the heady emotion of David Lean’s classic film Brief Encounter (1945) and it’s easy to see why it was chosen as the soundtrack.

It’s a musical rollercoaster of contemplation and elation–which it ably added to what might have otherwise been a bit of a staid drama.

Written while Rachmaninov was coming through a deep depression, the music does appear to render, in vivid hues, the complexities of human emotion – from the darkness of self-doubt to the intoxicating release that comes when the light is finally allowed in.

Chosen by reviews editor Michael Beek

 

 

Ravel Piano Concerto 

A whip crack. Jazz-infused melodies. A soundworld taking inspiration from Basque and Spanish music. What’s not to enjoy? Ravel’s concerto manages to achieve real emotional depth while also giving us the perfect party piece.

After the first movement, which is full of fire and fun, the second movement takes a step back and explores a much more serene landscape.

The piece ends with a final movement travelling through a series of unexpected key signatures to revisit the initial feisty atmosphere. It’s got everything you could wish for in a piano concerto. 

Chosen by editorial assistant Freya Parr

 

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C M Artist Of The Week: Bigger Than Home

Our Artist Of The Week is Bigger Than Home! Hailing from Ipswich, this 3-piece flips traditional jazz and blues on its head, drawing loads of influence from fusion and funk with a healthy sprinkling of swining’ hip-hop grooves to keep heads bobbing and bodies moving.

We’ve picked “Grammy Wammy” from the group’s rock-solid self-titled EP, and we think it’s perfectly highlights what this bombastic trio is all about! Check it out below:

https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/59WxTS4037HKimyOK9HZJJ

The post Artist Of The Week: Bigger Than Home appeared first on Richer Unsigned.

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On this Day January 21, 2012

Adele
was at No.1 on the US album chart with her second studio album 21. The album which yielded five hit singles including the lead single ‘Rolling in the Deep’, has now sold over 26.4 million copies worldwide.

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jfl #morninglistening to #Mahler on @ChannelClassics…

#morninglistening to #Mahler on @ChannelClassics w/@BudFestivalOrch. #ClaudioAbbado may have died on this date, but @fischer_ivan was born!
Amazon: http://a-fwd.to/58Y5Ck0
#HappyBirthday
i#Symphony No.9 ☆☆☆
#classicalmusic #classicalmusiccollection #classicalcdcollection #GustavMahler #orchestralmusic #symphonies
#birthdayboy Fischer once told me he’d never conduct/record a full cycle because

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