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falsepriest Raw Power in Raw Data: Linking Music Data Across Our Databases

One of the coolest and most unique things about Discogs is the sheer volume and power of music data that’s been diligently contributed by the community. Over the years, Discogs has become the place you go to find every physical release from pretty much every band and artist and all the data associated with those releases. 

Ultimately, we want Discogs to become the definitive discovery tool for finding, not just all music releases, but also all posters, books, and films, by, about, or related to your favorite artists. 

We’ve got the ball rolling with Discogs-style databases for films, books, and posters. These sites are growing at a rapid pace, with a strong music focus across all databases. They help add more insight, context, and more data to geek out on around our favorite music.

Now that we’ve got a good chunk of data, the next step is joining all these pieces together. By linking artists and credits across the sites, we’ll highlight music data connections, and bring more insight and context about artists, labels, music genres and scenes. 

You can get involved in our mission to connect music data: If a music artist also has page on Bookogs, Filmogs and Posterogs edit the artist’s Discogs page and add the link to it in the ‘Sites’ section. 

If you’re a systematic type, you can see which artists need linking and check them off as you go from one of these checklists for books, films and posters

Iggy Pop's Discogs page with music data including links to Bookogs, Filmogs, and Posterogs

It’s pretty satisfying discovering unexpected connections between the data and finding related films, books and posters. You, too, could be the archeologist of these pop culture nuggets. And there’s also rank points in it, if that’s your thing.

A few random facts we’ve discovered since we’ve started cross-linking artist data:

  • Brad Pitt has a Discogs artist page, though his list of credits isn’t that impressive with a grand total of one (surely a jazzy covers album or something is inevitable though). This is for speaking credit for lending his voice to an audiobook version of ‘All The Pretty Horses’ by Cormac McCarthy, released as a 2x cassette audiobook in 1993
  • Charlie Chaplin has a pretty impressive discography. In fact, so far he has more credits on Discogs than on Filmogs (we need to work on that)
  • Ray Bradbury was a literary powerhouse with many bibliography credits to his name. He’s also got an impressive stack of credits on Discogs and Filmogs, thanks to his brilliant and prolific output.
  • Despite Yoko Ono’s contributions to film and visual art, her only credits on Filmogs so far are Beatles-related documentaries.
  • Mike Skinner was in the 2011 InBetweeners movie
  • You can almost start to guess what style of music a band or artist plays based on the style of poster art they tend to go for

At last count, this it’s shaping up so far:

  • 3,500 links from Discogs to Bookogs, Filmogs and Posterogs
  • 4146 links from Bookogs credits and books to Discogs artist and releases
  • 1853 links from Filmogs credit and releases to Discogs artists and releases 
  • 841 links from Posterogs credit and poster pages to Discogs artists and releases

Collecting and connecting music data has always been the core mission of Discogs. By linking all the pieces together, we can make Discogs the central source of truth for all music data.

(Iggy would do it – look how impressed he is with those graphs).

Dig in and connect the music data: Link Bookogs, Filmogs and Posterogs artists and credits to their Discogs pages!

The post Raw Power in Raw Data: Linking Music Data Across Our Databases appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Moon_Ray Discogs Database In Review: November 2018

The end of the year is getting close and the total volume of contributions is beginning to slow down, in line with patterns seen in previous years. The huge spike in Artist and Label page edits from September and October has begun to slow as well, although there is still a lot of activity from a group of contributors working their way through Artists labeled as ‘Invalid’.

We’re still working hard to translate all the Database Guidelines into every language supported by Discogs – French, Italian, German, Japanese and Spanish. It’s no small feat, so a big thank you goes out to all the Contributors who helped translate the Database Glossary and the first ~5,000 words of the Submission Guidelines into Spanish over the past 3 weeks. It happened much faster than anticipated so we’re still evaluating how it went and working out how we can improve the process for future translations.

Overview

Daily Submissions

Top Contributors In November

From The Database Forum

New To The Database

There were no additions to the Guidelines in November.

 

The post Discogs Database In Review: November 2018 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Discogs Staff Exclusive: The Early Days Of Creedence Clearwater Revival

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To celebrate the 50th anniversary of iconic swamp rockers Creedence Clearwater Revival, Craft Recordings has released a deluxe vinyl box set called The Studio Albums. As the name implies, it collects all seven CCR studio albums, each of which was treated to fresh half-speed mastering at the famed Abbey Road Studios. Included in the box is an 80-page book featuring brand new liner notes tracing the band’s history. Below is an excerpt and some of the rare photos featured in the book.

By Roy Trakin

John Fogerty, Doug Clifford, and Stu Cook met at Portola Junior High School in 1959, forming a mostly instrumental trio, the Blue Velvets, which played “jukebox standards” of the day by the Ventures, Duane Eddy, Bill Doggett, Link Wray, and Freddie King for local high school dances and sock hops — with Fogerty on guitar, Cook on piano, and Clifford on drums. John’s older brother Tom, who had his own bands, including one dubbed Spider Webb And The Insects, was already married with a couple of kids and holding down a steady job at Pacific Gas & Electric when he was convinced to join as the lead singer for Tommy Fogerty and the Blue Velvets.

With Tom as the main vocalist and songwriter, the group signed to Oakland’s Orchestra Records, releasing three singles between 1961 and 1962, with Oh My Love, the second, added to KEWB San Francisco’s Top 40 playlist by none other than the late countdown king Casey Kasem.

At this point, Tom began playing rhythm guitar as well, John began collaborating on the writing and even penned a song on his own (Have You Ever Been Lonely), while Stu Cook switched from piano to bass. In 1964, the band headed to the studio for Fantasy Records, recording two songs co-written by the Fogerty brothers, Don’t Tell Me No Lies and Little Girl (Does Your Mamma Know), which came out in November.

John had seen a three-part TV special on the local jazz label, which had a national hit with pianist Vince Guaraldi’s Cast Your Fate To The Wind, and was soon employed as a clerk in the company’s shipping department.

Fantasy co-owner Max Weiss christened the band the Visions, then changed it to the Golliwogs, which was an attempt to market them as a British Invasion group like The Beatles or The Animals. The name was based on a children’s literary character, a blackface minstrel rag doll, which would eventually be dropped for its racist implications, but not before the band released several singles.

Just one of those singles, a Gloria-esque garage-band rocker, Brown- Eyed Girl (not the Van Morrison song, but credited to Tom and John Fogerty), garnered some airplay in Miami in 1968, landing at #10 on Billboard’s Regional Breakout chart.

Creedence Clearwater Revival

The Golliwogs were a fixture on the Bay Area scene, playing frat parties and pizza joints like the Monkey Inn in Berkeley, where they had a residency, with John now ensconced as the band’s lead vocalist, lead guitarist and primary songwriter, although he shared songwriting credit with Tom (the singles were credited to Wild-Green, their respective aliases Rann Wild and Toby Green).

“There was nothing remarkable about them at that time,” recalls longtime San Francisco Chronicle music journalist Joel Selvin. “There were dozens of bands such as Peter Wheat And The Breadmen, just like them.”

In 1966, John Fogerty and Doug Clifford were drafted, joining the Army Reserve and Coast Guard Reserve, respectively. Both were discharged in 1968, just after the Golliwogs’ final single was released, a John Fogerty composition dubbed Porterville, an early example of working-class fury based in part on his father’s experiences, written in between maneuvers baking in the hot sun during stints at Fort Bragg, Fort Knox, and Fort Lee.

Creedence Clearwater Revival

The song, which imagined his dad falling prey to the law from the common man’s point of view, evinced the swampy, Southern sound the band was cultivating — a combination Selvin describes as “Pops Staples’ guitar tunings and that Sun Studios echo … The band thought of themselves as Booker T. And The MG’s, with a Memphis sound.”

The quartet regrouped and recommitted to making it, playing live and hitting the recording studio under the auspices of new Fantasy Records owner Saul Zaentz, who agreed to the group’s desire to change their name. At the start of 1968 – after reportedly rejecting Hardwood (Stu’s choice), Gossamer Wump (Doug), Whiskey Rebellion (John), and Creedence Nuball and the Ruby (Tom) – they settled on Creedence Clearwater Revival. Their desire according to Cook, quoted in Hank Bordowitz’s 2007 Unauthorized History of Creedence Clearwater Revival, was for “something weird along the lines of Buffalo Springfield or Jefferson Airplane.”

Over the years, the band explained their choice of name: Credence Nuball was a South African custodian who lived in the apartment building of a friend of Tom’s, while the phrase “clear water” came from John mishearing the motto “clean water” from a PSA that followed a TV spot for Olympia Beer. Finally, “revival” expressed the foursome’s renewed commitment to their post-Golliwogs musical enterprise. “It told you this was an American rock and roll band, and it was unique,” wrote John in his 2015 autobiography, Fortunate Son.

Creedence Clearwater Revival

The Golliwogs’ final single, Porterville/Call It Pretending (credited to yet another pseudonym in T. Spicebush Swallowtail, a species of butterfly which was supposed to be the name credited to group compositions) was reissued under the band’s new moniker on the Fantasy subsidiary Scorpio. But it wasn’t until Susie Q. – which peaked at #11 on the Billboard Hot 100, receiving airplay not just on local Bay Area station KMPX, but Chicago’s WLS – that the band began to build real forward momentum.

Fogerty’s guitar playing on the song is a tribute to one of his idols, James Burton’s unique hybrid style, in which he used both a flat and metal finger pick. The final result was precisely what Creedence set out to do: “I’m gonna take a journey with this song,” said John.

Not a psychedelic trip, but a carefully planned, meticulously mapped-out expedition. The instrumental backing was recorded in a single take, with John returning to cut the vocal.

The post Exclusive: The Early Days Of Creedence Clearwater Revival appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Sean Cannon Mexican Summer at 10: Staffers Pick Their Favorite Albums

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For 10 years, Mexican Summer has danced across a radically shifting musical landscape. The label, birthed in 2008 by Kemado Records, has evolved from releasing limited-run vinyl editions to discovering and nurturing an array of musicians across 250 catalog releases, launching a reissue and publishing imprint, and unfolding the annual multi-faceted festival Marfa Myths in Marfa, Texas. A few members of Mexican Summer’s staff picked their favorite releases from the label’s catalog, and we at Discogs are pleased to share with you here.

Jefre Cantu-Ledesma - A Year With 13 Moons for sale

Jefre Cantu-Ledesma – A Year With 13 Moons (2014)

Walking 6th Ave. to Penn Station around this time of year, as fall succumbs to the cold, I first tried out A Year With 13 Moons, a sleeper hit and critical success from the previous winter. As a wall of fuzz reluctantly gave way to Jefre’s heartfelt melodies and zonked drums, it was like the sky made its way into my headphones, grayish and expansive, but with a lot more heart. For a short while the city slowed down, I drifted amid the rush of commuters, and let my eyes float upwards — something New Yorkers don’t tend to do enough of. I made my train, too.
— Max, Project Manager
Buy It On Discogs

Dungen - 4 for sale

Dungen – 4 (2008)

Fuzz guitars galore, jazz piano, hip hop drums, and even Swedish folk music – what more could one ask for? As a kid who thought that Tame Impala was the world’s greatest band, Dungen’s 4 was (and still is) an absolute thrill. I mean, just listen to Fredag or Det Tar Tid… Those guitar tones. Those drum fills! Plus Gustav’s Swedish drawl will forever and always make me swoon.
— Gil, Operations
Buy It On Discogs

Connan Mockasin - Forever Dolphin Love for sale

Connan Mockasin – Forever Dolphin Love (2010)

I first heard Forever Dolphin Love at a record store in Los Angeles and was struck by how beautifully odd it was.  The owner of the shop told me he had ordered an import version from Europe, but Connan and that album remained a bit of a mystery for some time after.  The music, however, stuck with me and apparently followed me, because years later I would learn that Mexican Summer was issuing its first US release.  It’s truly original and one of my favorites to revisit.
— Nancy, Sales Director
Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

Tamaryn - The Waves for sale

Tamaryn – The Waves (2010)

I was working in a record shop when The Waves came out. I was firmly in a shoegaze wormhole, so when this crossed my path I was immediately drawn to the expansive reverb and layered production. The song titles speak for themselves…Love Fade, Haze Interior, Mild Confusion. They also do a pretty good job of summing up my 20s.
— Ami, International Project Manager
Buy It On Discogs

Ramases - Space Hymns for sale

Ramases – Space Hymns (1971)

What label would release a wildly obscure album from 1971 made by a British HVAC maintenance man reincarnated as a Pharaoh and recording artist backed by the complete pre-10cc line up? The detail and love lavished in the six-panel poster reproduction of the original Roger Dean artwork and the sheer WTF-ness of taking a chance on such an obscure and awesome album such as Ramases’ Space Hymns provoked a curiosity in the label’s passion that has remained to this day.
— Matt, Creative Director
Buy It On Discogs

Washed Out - Life of Leisure for sale

Washed Out – Life of Leisure (2009)

Keith dropped this on Jeff K.’s and my desk (back when our office was less than a handful of folks). Instant classic EP, and it still plays well.
– Tom, Managing Director
Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

Weyes Blood - The Innocents for sale

Weyes Blood – The Innocents (2014)

When I first took on production at the label we were in the process of having The Innocents mastered. I listened through all of Lipton’s refs and could clearly pick up on the studio mix and bpm for every track, until I got Bad Magic. This is a super simple song but it had been tracked live with vocals and guitar together (at least I think it was that way) and it stuck out to me as singular and authentic, and I was drawn deep into the album from there.
– Warren, General Manager
Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

Ashrae Fax - Static Crash for sale

Ashrae Fax – Static Crash (2013)

I remember working the front desk at my college radio station when this CD came in the mail. I pulled it randomly from the stack that arrived every day and listened straight through, over and over. Deepest DIY Cocteau Twins worship nearly lost to obscurity!
– Zack, Sales Coordinator
Buy It On Discogs

Connan Mockasin - Caramel for sale

Connan Mockasin – Caramel (2013)

I first saw this record without knowing about Connan and was totally transfixed by this blonde version of what looked like a Prince record cover. I fell in love with the album and really savoured it over a period of probably a year. I didn’t even want to listen to Forever Dolphin Love for a long time, as I was so stuck on Caramel.
– Jodi, International Marketing Director

Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

Best Coast - Crazy For You for sale

Best Coast – Crazy For You (2010)

I know it’s an obvious one, but someone’s got to mention it. I live in London where it apparently rains 106.5 days out of the year, so hearing this jangly, steady Californian pop record when I was 17 years old slathered some much needed vitamin D onto my pasty British skin.
– Joanie, International Project Manager
Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

Peter Matthew Bauer - Liberation for sale

Peter Matthew Bauer – Liberation! (2014)

Great for young’ins letting go of strange religious upbringings. I played it a lot at my old cafe job (making coffee for vest men on Wall Street), smiling while people yelled at their phones, and Peter sang about Shiva.
– Connor, Warehouse Manager
Buy It On Discogs

Quilt - Quilt for sale

Quilt – Quilt (2011)

I remember listening to this album, specifically the song Penobska Oakwalk, in the car with my sister on the way to high school. I made tons of mix CDs at the time (no aux cord), and this this somehow made it onto a bunch of them. The airy background vocals and simple, thumping drums sounded perfect as we cruised beneath the canopy of oaks that swallowed the two-lane road we took to school.
– Ben, Marketing Coordinator

Buy It On The Sound Of Vinyl

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Discogs Staff The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of October 2018

Neapolitan duo Nu Guinea continue their dominance on the top 50 in 2018, this time all the way at the number one spot. Even before our big change from master releases to release variants, their album Nu Guinea was hanging around month after month. Already on its fourth repress, who knows how long it can stick around?

And hey, remember back in October when Pitchfork savaged Greta Van Fleet for, well, everything about the band? It generated more headlines than Pitchfork had in years. However, it turns out that Fleetheads (let’s just assume that’s what their fans are called) didn’t care. Their latest album and their last album both made the list this time around.

Then of course there’s Tracy Chapman at number 12. Always Tracy Chapman.

Nu Guinea - Nuova Napoli

#1 – Nu Guinea – Nuova Napoli

LP, Album, RP, 3rd & 4th Repress

Greta Van Fleet - Anthem Of The Peaceful Army

#20 – Greta Van Fleet – Anthem Of The Peaceful Army

LP, Album, Ltd, M/Print, Yellow Translucent

Saâda Bonaire - Saâda Bonaire

#26 – Saâda Bonaire – Saâda Bonaire

2xLP, Comp, Ltd, RE, Clear

Queen - Greatest Hits

#29 – Queen – Greatest Hits

LP, Comp, No Barcode, Round Cornered Innersleeve

Michael Jackson - Thriller

#30 – Michael Jackson – Thriller

LP, Album, Pitman Pressing, No Co-Producer Credits, Gatefold

Ryo Fukui - Scenery

#33 – Ryo Fukui – Scenery

LP, Album, Ltd, RE, 180

Madonna - Erotica

#36 – Madonna – Erotica

2xLP, Album, Ltd, RE, White, Gatefold

The Devil Wears Prada - With Roots Above And Branches Below

#39 – The Devil Wears Prada – With Roots Above And Branches Below

LP, Album, Ltd, RP, Dark Blue/Yellow Merge [Night Sky Swirl]

Sade - Diamond Life

#40 – Sade – Diamond Life

LP, Album, Blue Labels, Gatefold

Eagles - Hotel California

#41 – Eagles – Hotel California

LP, Album, SP – Specialty Pressing

Queen - A Night At The Opera

#48 – Queen – A Night At The Opera

LP, Album, Embossed Gatefold

The post The Discogs Top 50 Best Selling Records Of October 2018 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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Sean Cannon A Survey Of David Byrne’s Fascination With Live Performance

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The Best Live Show Of All Time – NME. That’s a quote from the famed British music mag about David Byrne’s 144-date tour in support of March’s American Utopia. As of this week though, it’s also the exact title of a six-song EP recorded during that tour. Byrne just released a deluxe edition of American Utopia, which includes the superbly-named EP.

As it happens, the quote and the title aren’t simply bluster. Byrne’s latest tour removed everything from the floor, including cables, amps, stands — and even the drum set. In its place, several percussionists carried drums, in the style of a marching band. Just like those high school ensembles, Byrne and the group had elaborate choreography throughout the entire set.

The live show was universally praised and heralded as something next level, with The Atlantic calling it a “reinvention of the rock concert.” Byrne’s lighting designer, Rob Sinclair, admitted to Monocle Magazine, “I didn’t realise quite how revolutionary [it was] until the show opened.” Then, of course, there’s the NME quote.

While you can’t see the striking visuals on this latest live recording, the energy is palpable in the music. The EP also brings to mind Byrne’s longtime fascination with the way live performance affects how we receive music. As he said in an interview with himself decades ago, “Music is very physical, and often the body understands it before the head.” This inspired us to look back at his history with the intersection of songwriting and live performance by revisiting a few highlights from his career.

This is a studio album, but it’s uniquely tied to live performance. Before the Talking Heads’ break up, and before the band fully broke into the mainstream, Byrne released one of his best solo albums. He didn’t write and release it for his own ends, though. It was at the behest of famed dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp. She commissioned Byrne to compose a score for her second Broadway project, The Catherine Wheel.

The album features stout session players like Yogi Horton and occasional Talking Heads sideman Adrian Belew. In addition to the abridged album and full score releases, the piece was broadcast in its entirety on PBS.

While 1983’s Remain In Light pushed Talking Heads to new heights, it was Jonathan Demme’s iconic concert film the following year that made them a bonafide cultural phenomenon. The film’s soundtrack, on the other hand, was less celebrated. Containing only nine songs, it jumbles Byrne’s meticulously planned stage show and is missing more than a few key moments.

That said, an expanded edition was released in 1999 that tried to right those wrongs. There’s no way to replicate the film’s charms in audio form, but the 1999 version does as good a job as possible. On songs like Once In A Lifetime and Take Me To The River, you can hear the band at the height of their powers.

There’s nothing revolutionary about this album. It is beautiful, though. In 2001, Byrne was supporting Look into the Eyeball when he appeared on the venerated live showcase Austin City Limits. Six years later, the set was released as Live From Austin, TX. Instead of focusing exclusively on the latest album, Byrne weaves tracks from his entire catalog into the show.

The most compelling facet of the performance is the way he reworks some of those hits, gently massaging them into world music-informed numbers that seem both familiar and foreign at the same time. This is heightened by the presence of a string sextet for most of the evening. Oh, and the cover of Whitney Houston’s I Wanna Dance with Somebody is a pretty epic closer!

In 2004, Carnegie Hall invited Brazilian artist Caetano Veloso to curate a performance that would be broadcast via NPR. Veloso asked Byrne, his longtime friend and collaborator, to come along for the ride. The result was a solo set from each, in addition to collaborative material. The voice and demeanor of both performers couldn’t be more different, yet the resulting quirkiness works throughout. It was eventually released as an album in 2012.

In interviews after the event, Byrne admitted that he was nervous about the unique set. Whereas his performances usually appear considered, tight, and well-planned, you can hear occasional apprehension in his delivery. The uncharacteristic nature of that vulnerability adds a certain intrigue.

As with the first entry in this list, Here Lies Love isn’t properly a live recording. Byrne and Fatboy developed a concept album about the life of Filipino first lady Imelda Marcos and her nanny. The original version featured a bevy of memorable performances by female vocalists including Cyndi Lauper, Santigold, Florence Welch, Sharon Jones, and Tori Amos, among others. This led to a short off-Broadway run for the multimedia spectacular and the attendant original cast recording, which is lively and delightful.

And just for kicks, here is an amazing William Onyeabor cover from The Tonight Show with an all-star cast:

The post A Survey Of David Byrne’s Fascination With Live Performance appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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_OcieLian_ Where To Find Gig Posters Since GigPosters.com Disappeared

Gigposters.com was once a much loved site for music and gig posters fans all over the world. At its peak, its database was home to over 160,000 gig posters, and humming forums where you could interact directly with talented and well-known poster artists. Sadly, around 2016, mods deemed the site unsustainable due to hacker attacks and increasing maintenance costs, and gigposters.com was no more. It left a void in the music and gig poster fan scene, and many in the community at a bit of a loose end.

So where can you go to geek out on gig posters now?

The short and convenient answer: Posterogs!

If you haven’t checked it out yet, it’s our newest and fast expanding spin-off site. Our mission to catalog every physical music release from all over the world extends to connecting those releases to other music collectibles.

Some quick facts about Posterogs:

But I didn’t create a whole blog post just to tell you about Posterogs. There’s so many amazing gig posters and poster artists and sources of info out there that deserve your attention. Be prepared to lose hours falling down this rabbit hole.

Where to find gig posters:

Instagram
Go straight to the source by following poster artists on Instagram. This might require a little background work as you get to know some artists and what kind of poster and print styles interest you most (check out our Following list on Instagram for inspiration). Following artists on Instagram is also a great way to show your support while getting your fix.  You can also follow hashtags like #gigposters to get more of a fix.

Reddit
As well as subreddits like r/gigposters and r/concertposterporn, following subreddits of your favorite bands is also a good bet – fellow fans often share gig and concert posters in here. Some bands even have subreddits just devoted just to their concert posters. It’s not uncommon to see some amazing Queens of the Stone Age posters in r/qotsa, and Foo Fighters posters in r/Foofighters.

Pinterest
Seriously – I’m not trying to trick you into looking at gluten-free paleo-future muffin recipes or whatever. Pinterest has some amazing gig posters and artwork, and it’s pretty well organised into folders and categories. It’s basically a search engine for images. Prove me wrong (or just look at our pins).

Flatstock
Ugh, what is that, natural light? You have to leave the house for this one, but it’s worth it. Flatstock is a series of events organized by the American Poster Institute, displaying and selling gig posters from some of the world’s most talented artists. One of their biggest showings is at SXSW, but the show travels much further afield – from Chicago to Hamburg to Barcelona and more.

Record stores
Many record stores also have a great selection of band posters for sale, and promotional posters for upcoming albums, gigs and tours. It could be worth asking at the counter if they’ve got any promo posters that have served their purpose and are on their way out.

Gigs
You’ll probably come across a lot of gig posters at venues, either for upcoming shows, or with the band’s merch offerings (The Flaming Lips had some killer posters on offer at a recent show – they’re also available on their website
). And buying merch is always a good idea.

Help us build the most comprehensive gig poster database ever: Add your gig posters to the database!

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discogs The Best Live Shows Of 2018

We know the first word that comes to mind when you think of Discogs is not “live music”. But in all fairness, a lot of us enjoy live music as much as we do listening to our favorite records at home. So we love sharing our favorite live music performances of 2018 with the community and we hope that you witnessed some great ones too! Chances are that we might have even crossed paths, who knows!

As it normally happens with all our Staff Picks, our favorite concerts of the year are quite a mixed bag where you’ll probably find some artist or band that you love as much as we do. So, without more ado, these are the live shows of 2018 that left us breathless:

Belle & Sebastian / Japanese Breakfast

Oregon Zoo (Portland, USA)

Belle and Sebastian

Final show of a rare US Belle & Sebastian tour and the energy couldn’t have been better. Maybe they were just thrilled to be done with it all, but the show was fantastic, with lead singer Stuart Lee Murdoch putting on a class act throughout their 2+ hour set. Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast grew up in Oregon (despite absconding to the East coast), and seeing her in a homecoming show was heart-warming. And wow, she can really rock. With the stage right next to the elephant habitat, seeing the big guys come out to enjoy the show too was such a treat.

Steven, Search Engine Marketer


Volcanic Pinnacles

Doug Fir (Portland, USA)

Volcanic Pinnacles

Spontaneous transcendence.

Alex, Community Success Coordinator


Primavera Sound 2018

(Barcelona, Spain)

Primavera Sound

I’m just going to pretend all performances at Primavera Sound count as one; Beach House, Lee Fields & The Expressions, Björk, Four Tet, Slowdive, Carpenter Brut, and Lindstrøm (❤) made it to the top of the list for me – but I, unfortunately, missed many great shows – otherwise Nine Inch Nails (where does Trent Reznor pull so much energy from?!) and Jon Hopkins in Amsterdam.

Coumba, Community Success Coordinator


Kikagaku Moyo

Multiple Locations (NY, OR)

Kikagaku Moyo

As far as I’m concerned, Kikagaku Moyo can do not wrong. I was lucky enough to catch these cosmic travelers four times this year (Mississippi Studios, Revolution Hall and Pickathon in Oregon, Market Hotel in Brooklyn), each show a heady blend of hypnotic grooves and out there psychedelic wig outs. Not a band to stick to note-for-note album versions live, they playfully stretch out their songs into extended jams with heavy riffage, pastoral folk daydreams and sitar driven trances delivered in equal parts. Not to mention they look cool AF with their long hippie hair and shirts adorned with flowery patterns. Both a throwback to the past and a glimpse into the future of psych rock, I hope I can catch these guys four times next year too!

Stevie, Marketing Coordinator


Dropkick Murphys / Flogging Molly

The Cuthbert Amphitheater (Portland, USA)

Dropkick Murphys

I kind of want to give it to the Foo Fighters at the Moda Center because they unleashed a killer Ramones cover and I got to see Grohl play the drums… BUT I am going to have to give it to the Dropkick Murphys and Flogging Molly Summer tour. As always, it was a party, and you can’t beat the energy these fans bring. The smaller venue (The Cuthbert Amphitheater) helped this experience pack a lot of punch and you could feel the sound in your bones. One of my all-time happy moments in 2018.

Carissa, Email Marketing Lead


Ezra Collective

Paradiso (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

Ezra Collective

Ezra Collective at Paradiso took the crown for me (so far) this year – a really nice Latin Jazz gig with loads of soul and heart- more dancing and waving than beard stroking and nodding (though I am a fan of either!). Can’t recommend them live enough, one of the best riding a strong wave of Jazz music coming out of London at the moment!

Louis, Commercial Manager


Thom Yorke

Carré Theatre (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

Thom Yorke

Think it would have to be Thom Yorke at the beautiful Carré Theatre in Amsterdam. This was the first time I saw him solo and he put on an amazing show. The lights, dancing and intimacy makes this my fav for 2018. Plus it made me discover Oliver Coates who supported him and I have been listening to his album from this year (Shelley’s on Zenn-La) a fair bit since the show.

Claire, VP People & Culture


My Bloody Valentine

Meltdown 2018 (London, UK)

My Bloody Valentine

So. Many. Incredible. Shows. This. Year.

Now seriously, in 2018 I got to see killer shows by Kendrick Lamar, Nick Cave, Fever Ray, Iceage, Niño de Elche, Spiritualized, Björk, James Blake… But probably the gig that will have a special place in my heart forever will be the comeback concert of My Bloody Valentine during Robert Smith‘s curated Meltdown 2018. I’m not going to get much into detail, but thanks to my friend Andy, my brother and I made it to meet Kevin Shields. I’m still having a heart attack since that day. The concert was beautiful too, and the visuals, and the crowd. Life can be crazy sometimes. Andy, if you’re reading this, thank you for making us the happiest people in the world for a night.

Javi, Content Marketing and Social Media Specialist


Mount Kimbie

Holocene (Portland, USA)

Mount Kimbie

I love when a band surprises you with their live performances. I love when the song that used to be your least favorite, suddenly becomes your all-time favorite once you hear it live. This happened to me last May at a Mount Kimbie show. Before the show, I liked Mount Kimbie a lot. I played the crap out of Cold Spring Fault Less Youth when it came out in 2013 and kept it in my regular rotation for the next five years. Honestly, I was getting to a point where I had played it too much. It wasn’t moving me the way it once did. Then I saw them at Holocene in Portland, Oregon. Their performance was completely different than I thought it would be. I was expecting it to be a chill, hip-hop vibe affair – which is totally cool. However, it was a full-on, in-your-face ocean of sound coming at me in a very Joy Division-y way. So good. Good enough that I bought the other albums and they are all in my permanent rotation.

Tasha, Community Success Manager


David Byrne / Iggy Pop

AFAS Live (Amsterdam, NL) / at Paaspop 2018 (Schijndel, NL)

David Byrne

It’s a tie between David Byrne in Amsterdam and Iggy Pop at Paaspop festival. David Byrne because he brought a completely new angle to what a concert should be or look like, very inspiring and amazing to watch and listen to. Iggy Pop because it was incredible to experience the complete change of energy in the venue the moment he entered the stage!

Lilian, Regional Community Marketing Lead


A Lot of Stuff

(Netherlands)

Sleep

Choosing one performance from this year only, damn that is hard! I can’t sorry… I have enjoyed so many live shows, DJ sets and concerts this year.

I loved seeing Big Brave again early this year, they are so powerful and intense, also a pretty chill band to talk to.
This was at OCCII, where I also enjoyed Oiseaux Tempête and the Zenevloed label event!

Gnod’s and Insect Ark concert at dB’s was sick and we all went a bit crazy!

I was able to see The Bug three times this year, he played with Khan at Melkweg where low lights and massive sound system made the venue bounce. However, his show at Dekmantel with Miss Red was fire and, she saw me dancing the way she was dancing so she came to me to dance together, OMG!

Dekmantel was awesome as well, I got to see (finally) my favourite musician playing live, Four Tet opening concert was so especial! The best acts of the festival for me were Aurora Halal playing live with Relaxer, they are so tight! Clark performing Death Peak live had some crazy lights and dancers, say what?! Then I would say Samuel Kerridge broke me up with his industrial sound!

Rewire was also something to remember, artist like JASS, Volvox, The Thing, Lanark Artefax and Visionist really blew my mind!

Roadburn was filled with dope acts! The jam East Meets West Jam with Earthless & Kikagaku Moyo completely improvised was super especial! Waste of Space Orchestra, who are Dark Buddha Rising united with Oranssi Pazuzu, are simply out of this world, their show does not look human but something else! Bell Witch playing Mirror Reaper almost makes me cry, these two are incredible. Zonal ft. Moor Mother bass and raps were super intense, maybe one in life time that I can get to see Justin K Broadrick and Kevin Martin together? Hope not!

Then many other crazy shows like: Godflesh, The Heads, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Mizmor, Minami Deutsch, Horte… that festival is simply too incredible! Can’t wait for next year!

Last but not least, I must say, Sleep playing in Tivoli was one of the best concerts of the year and they are coming to Roadburn in 2019 to play both Holy Mountain and The Sciences in full, come on, is this real?! It’s gonna be so good!

Esther, CS Specialist


Con Brio

Crystal Ballroom, Portland

Con Brio
Incredible musicians with tons of energy! The onstage presence was magic and quality of sound like nothing else! Even if you haven’t heard of them, definitely check out their live performances.

Stacey, Full Stack Developer


Leroy Burgess

Strange Sounds From Beyond 2018 (Amsterdam, NL)

Leroy Burgess

Leroooooyyyyyyyyyyyyy (not Jenkins) but Burgess. Disco producer legend, showman extraordinaire, the king of all things Disco is back on the stage for a year or 2 now. I finally had the chance to witness this historical event at Strange Sounds From Beyond. He played all the classics and we also got the chance to have Christine Wiltshire from Phreek to sing that classic weekend track. A magical moment, I will never forget!

Clim, CS Coordinator


Spiritualized with Orchestra & Choir

Primavera Sound 2018 (Barcelona, Spain)

Spiritualized

I have no words to describe how beautiful was enjoying “Ladies And Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space” songs with an orchestra and a choir into a sold-out Auditorium. It made me feel so special. This is probably one of the most astonishing albums I’ve ever listened and having the opportunity of listening to the songs in an environment such as that was amazing. Psychedelia meets Gospel meets floaty music. I cried watching that show. It was a cosmic experience.

Arnau, Regional Community Marketer


The Jesus Lizard

Crystal Ballroom (Portland, USA)

The Jesus Lizard

They’ve still got it!

Jason, Director of Marketplace Engineering


Flaming Lips

Melkweg (Amsterdam, NL)

I saw the Flaming Lips for the first time a few weeks ago and holy hell. Why isn’t every show I go to like this? I was so filled with joy but also regret at not having seen them sooner. 2018 was a killer year for gigs, and I got to catch some incredible festival performances by Nick Cave, Anderson .Paak, IDLES and a tonne more. But seriously, Flaming Lips. Incomparable bliss.

Jess, Community Marketer


Arcade Fire

Antwerps Sportpaleis (Antwerp, Belgium)

Arcade Fire

“Make sure you look for the blue tape on the floor,” my cousin Jill wrote to me in October 2017, half a year before the show. “It leads them into the arena and up to the entrance gate at the stage!” Jill had just seen Arcade Fire the night before, and was already excitedly messaging me how we could get the best spots for mine and my girlfriend’s Arcade Fire show in Antwerp in April. Sylvia and I took note and six months later we arrived at the Antwerps Sportpaleis, 3 hours before the show was scheduled to start, with her tips in hand.

The show was perfect. We stood right at the spot where the band finished their way through the crowd and jumped up on stage. We bopped and sang and danced in front of the stage in their shadows for the rest of the show. The set ended with the Preservation Jazz Hall Band coming on stage and closing with “Wake Up”, and then they all hopped back into the crowd and danced their way past us.

It was one of those special shows where the atmosphere matched your emotions and you knew every song the band played. “Why can’t every night be an Arcade Fire concert,” I wrote back to Jill after the show. “Ya life is pretty much downhill after an Arcade Fire show,” she agreed. “I was depressed for days!!” Ah, post-concert multi-day depression glow – definitely the sign of the best live act of the year.

David, CS Manager

The post The Best Live Shows Of 2018 appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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loquearde A Beginner’s Guide To Indie: 10 Indie Records You Should Own

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Indie might be one of the genres that’s harder to define. And the reason is that the term coined as indie simply referred at the beginning to artists who distributed their music independently, outside of the major labels. But as time passed, indie began to be more related to the attitude and aesthetics of those artists more than strictly to the means of distribution or commercial success. While sometimes the genre (especially indie pop) can be seen as cute and tame, indie crossed through styles represented by artists who knew how to show their teeth too.

Choosing just ten records within such a hugely influential and long-standing genre is simply impossible. So I feel like it’s worth mentioning a good bunch of artists and bands who haven’t made the cut but whose records have been hugely influential: The Jesus and Mary Chain, Dinosaur Jr, Guided By Voices, Galaxie 500, Modest Mouse, Wilco, Low, The Strokes, Red House Painters, Arcade Fire, Built To Spill, Deerhunter, Sleater-Kinney, Sebadoh, Tortoise… And that’s just to name a few!

Yes, everyone has a different idea of what indie means and represents, and that’s OK. With this list, our intention is just to offer an introduction to an endlessly enjoyable genre. Let us know in the comments what’s your favorite indie record of all time is!

Television Personalities

… And Don’t The Kids Just Love It

(1981)

Television Personalities - And Don't The Kids Just Love It

Television Personalities were indies before indie was a thing. The band of Dan Tracey reached success thanks to their hit “Part-Time Punks” and their first LP set the template for many bands to come. Charming, witty, lo-fi, and very DIY. Their influence can be traced in bands as different as Hefner or MGMT.
Buy it on Discogs


Beat Happening

Beat Happening

(1985)

Beat Happening - Beat Happening

Beat Happening incorporated the punk ethic into the indie aesthetics from Olympia, Washington. Instead of trying to hide their DIY recording process and amateur musicianship, they brought it right to the front of their music. Their first LP showed the world the beauty behind lo-fi sound and proved that with passion and love for music, sky is the limit.
Buy it on Discogs


Pixies

Surfer Rosa

(1988)

Pixies - Surfer Rosa

Straight out of Boston, Pixies came into the scene slashing any previous ideas of what alternative rock could or should be. Their twisted imagery and soft/loud songs structure made them almost instantly iconic. But besides the aesthetic choices, it’s also hard to think of a band with better ability to blend seamlessly pop sensibility with quasi-hardcore punk influences.
Buy it on Discogs


Sonic Youth

Daydream Nation

(1988)

Sonic Youth - Daydream Nation

Summer in New York can be a truly suffocating experience, and “Daydream Nation” is solid evidence of it. Recorded in the summer of 1988 by Sonic Youth, “Daydream Nation” solidified their status as one of the most defying and exciting bands in the United States. Few bands in history can release five masterpieces in just seven years, but Sonic Youth proved to the world they were ready to break through. “EVOL” (1986), “Sister” (1987), “Daydream Nation” (1988), “Goo” (1990), and “Dirty” (1992) are all masterpieces in their own terms. Hard to beat, huh?
Buy it on Discogs


My Bloody Valentine

Loveless

(1991)

My Bloody Valentine - Loveless

Out of Ireland, the second album by My Bloody Valentine was released on November 1991, and it arguably changed music forever. Kevin Shields took his recording techniques a step further and created a new sound that took the scene by storm. Distortion, feedback, delay, and playing the whole time with the tremolo of his guitar were part of the process. The result is one of the most easily recognizable and challenging albums of all time. But you don’t need to hear me rave about how cool this album is anymore, just head to any of the songs of the album on Youtube and read the comments.
Buy it on Discogs


Nirvana

Nevermind

(1991)

Nirvana - Nevermind

If “Loveless” changed the rules of recording forever, Nirvana commanded the assault of the underground to the mainstream the same year. ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit‘ took MTV and the world by storm, and allowed “Nevermind” to debunk the by-then number one album in America: Michael Jackson‘s “Dangerous“. And while we can argue this could just be a coincidence, it also marked the very beginning of grunge and alternative rock becoming popular and reaching massive audiences. Whether you have ever listened or not to this album, is there anyone on Earth who cannot recognize the iconic cover?
Buy it on Discogs


PJ Harvey

Rid Of Me

(1993)

PJ Harvey - Rid Of Me

It’s hard to pigeonhole PJ Harvey‘s style. While she’s normally associated with alternative rock, her second album was clearly rooted in the Delta blues tradition and had elements of other genres as well. PJ Harvey‘s rawness was almost unparalleled and “Rid Of Me” felt instantly like a classic. Lust, revenge, loneliness, violence… The thematic palette of Harvey’s breakthrough album feverishly slashed any gender prejudice. Listening to it now, “Rid Of Me” still slaps as hard as it did 25 years ago.
Buy it on Discogs


Pavement

Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain

(1994)

Pavement - Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain

“Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain” started with a sentence that did little to no justice to the Pavement legacy: ‘Silent kid, no one to remind you’. Well, thankfully, Pavement will be remembered by plenty of reasons. One of the pillars of the American underground during the nineties, Stephen Malkmus and company created their own distinctive brand of songwriting blending with ease short bursts of absurd into the everyday common narrative. Also, isn’t “Cut Your Hair” one of the most endlessly enjoyable songs ever written?
Buy it on Discogs


Yo La Tengo

I Can Hear The Heart Beating As One

(1997)

Yo La Tengo - I Can Hear The Heart Beating As One

Yo La Tengo were not exactly new to the scene when they released “I Can Hear The Heart Beating As One“. Actually, this is their eighth album! As good as they’ve always been, Yo La Tengo were unashamed music geeks with the ability to go from the minimalistic tenderness of ‘My Little Corner Of The World’ to the sugary and highly caffeinated noise pop of ‘Sugarcube’ effortlessly. Many bands would kill for this to be a compilation of their whole body of work, Yo La Tengo made it all together in just one record.
Buy it on Discogs


Neutral Milk Hotel

In The Aeroplane Over The Sea

(1998)

Neutral Milk Hotel ‎– In The Aeroplane Over The Sea

As I mentioned long ago in the introduction of this post, indie can be considered more of an attitude and aesthetic than a hard genre. And Neutral Milk Hotel are hard evidence of this statement. It’s hard to word this better than my colleague Sean did for our Best Records Of 1998 article:

In The Aeroplane Over The Sea was idyllic, melancholy, joyful, obtuse, welcoming, eccentric, endearing, and downright bizarre all at once. From the almost unintelligible hum of guitar on Holland, 1945 to the somber brass on the title track to the bagpipes on Untitled — not to mention the singing saw, zanzithophone, and a shortwave radio! — the album cobbles together castaway sounds to create its own language. In the ensuing decades, many have borrowed bits and piece of Neutral Milk Hotel’s musical DNA, but no one has duplicated it.

The post A Beginner’s Guide To Indie: 10 Indie Records You Should Own appeared first on Discogs Blog.

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