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mike@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

Christmas comes early for fans of the late, great Brit-jazz tenorist Tubby Hayes as Universal have announced the arrival of an unreleased 1969 studio album, entitled Grits, Beans and Greens: The Lost Fontana Sessions, which is to be released on 26 July, 50 years after its recording.

The tapes were in perfect condition and had never been played since the recording, with reports suggesting the music ranks as highly as Hayes’ classic albums 100% Proof and Mexican Green. Alongside this the label also possesses all of the original tapes for Hayes’ 11 Fontana albums, plus lots of out-takes and never before issued material, all of which will be remastered and reissued in one mighty Tubby Hayes on Fontana box set.

And, in a further move to ensure maximum collectability, all of the albums have been remastered by Gearbox Records, with the LPs being cut to the lacquers directly from the tapes, the resulting pure analogue sound potentially better than the original LPs. Hayes expert Simon Spillett has contributed liner notes to the set which will also features dozens of rare or unseen photos of Tubby in his heyday. “It’s hard to believe that this music has lain unheard for fifty years, it’s so fresh” says Spillett. “There’s no doubt in my mind that had they been issued at the time, these recordings would have been seen as Tubby’s last great album”.

See the July issue of Jazzwise for an in-depth feature on this newly discovered album from one of Britain’s most celebrated jazz musicians.

Mike Flynn

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spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

catfish sjq

Baritone saxophonist Cath Roberts and guitarist Anton Hunter take their mutant improv duo Ripsaw Catfish out on the road at the end of June.

Catch them at the following venues: Notes & Sounds, University Arms, Sheffield (24 June); Noise Upstairs, Golden Lion, Todmorden (25 June); Flim Flam, Ryan’s Bar, London (26 June) and Summit, The Eagle, Salford (27 June).

Spencer Grady

For more details visit www.cathrobertsmusic.co.uk

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spencer@jazzwise.com (Spencer Grady)

Chicago Jazz String Summit 19 9 268 5x7

The fifth annual Chicago Jazz String Summit took place at various venues in Chicago between May 2-5. The brainchild of self-effacing, yet proactive cellist Tomeka Reid, the festival has yet to achieve attention commensurate with its quality of programming. Incredibly, Reid, in the spirit of the AACM’s “start your own thing”, mostly funds the event herself, taking care of artists’ fees, lodging and transportation. “The CJSS was a direct response to the Summit concerts the Jazz Institute of Chicago were having for the typical ‘jazz’ instruments (trumpet, drums, piano, sax) – there was not a summit for the string players,” commented Reid. “The first one was held in 2013. I took an hiatus in 2014 and 2015 due to my own tour schedule and lack of time to raise funds, but I started back in 2016. The event focuses on violin, viola and cello players who are leaders and compose original music. I aim to create community, so we learn each other’s work, build new audiences and encourage string players to improvise more.”

The in-demand Reid is involved in countless projects herself: a few days after the festival she was invited by Joe Morris to join an all-star group with himself, Evan Parker and Ned Rothenberg at Real Art Ways in Connecticut; prior to that she convened her large Reid Stringtet at her alma mater, the University of Maryland, performing music inspired by her mother’s visual art, and also performed at Knoxville’s hip Big Ears Festival with Artifacts, a collective with drummer Mike Reed and flautist Nicole Mitchell; (she was at London’s Cafe OTO with Mitchell and pianist Alexander Hawkins in April). Unlike many curators who give themselves a gig, Reid did not perform until the final night of CJSS at the Hungry Brain, when three combo sets were pulled from a hat. 

Chicago Jazz String Summit 19 9 375 5x7

“I ask that each of the leaders stay for the duration of the Summit, if they are able, and on the last day we have a jam session. I also have all of the sets recorded. One group even released their recording.” No doubt this leads to significant additional expense for Reid but palpably promoted a bonding vibe over the four-day festival which took place at the Arts Club, Constellation, Elastic Arts and the Brain. Genius of sabotage Tristan Honsinger (pictured above) was eager to play for the first time with fellow eccentric Fred Lonberg-Holm in a spontaneous aggregation that opened the jam night and included Vancouver-based violinist Joshua Zubot. Lonberg-Holm laid down rock power, pedal-driven cello distortion with Stirrup – his trio with bassist Nick Macri (pictured below with Lonberg-Holm) and drummer Charles Rumback – for the first set but seemed respectively acquiescent to the unpredictable Honsinger, who gesticulated spasmodically like Popeye with Tourette’s, blurting satirical politicised half-pronouncements when least expected. When Honsinger played at Constellation with In the Sea, bandmates Zubot and bassist Nicolas Caloia had to adapt to the maverick cellist plucking scraps of collaged manuscript from an unruly pile, jump-cutting to a new piece at whim.

Fred Lonberg Holm 19 9 457 5x7

Honsinger feigns dilettantism and stomps feet wildly to his own muse, but archly brings that muse to heel. In sharp contrast the beautifully poised chamber music of fellow cello legend Akua Dixon followed, revisiting arrangements from an eponymous 2014 album with a festival-fresh cadre of collaborators, including violist Leslie DeShazor and violinists Zara Zaharieva and Eddy Kwon. During this recital Dixon demonstrated her prowess as a section mate, drawing on considerable experience in the pit at the Apollo and playing for a plethora of celebrated Broadway productions. Kwon’s exquisite high-register forays on Piazzolla’s ‘Libertango’ and then ‘Besame Mucho’ were a highlight, later bested, by all accounts, during a solo set at Elastic. I was suitably berated by Reid for missing that set, but did catch debonair Grammy nominee Sara Caswell’s impressively tight quartet with guitarist Jesse Lewis, bassist Ike Sturm and Jared Schonig. In front of Damon Locks’ evocative logo artwork for the CJSS, Caswell appropriately re-harmonised ‘Bye Bye Blackbird’ (the image has silhouetted birds emerging from a cello scroll into the Chicago cityscape), continuing with the obscure Jobim piece ‘O Que Tinha de Ser’ and Egberto Gismonti’s playfully antiphonal ‘7 Anéis’. 

Due to the limited sustain of their instruments (when unplugged), string players are wonderful to watch as they maintain momentum with dramatic arm movement and are frequently masters of counterpoint, buoying each other with perhaps greater precision and attentiveness than your average jazz axe wielder. Such was amply on display at this ambitious, valuable event, which warrants broader support.

Michael Jackson 

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The Bristol International Jazz & Blues Festival has launched a crowdfunder campaign to save the event after a combination of challenging circumstances have threatened its future. In spite of returning for its seventh edition this year, the festival’s move away from the city’s Colston Hall (due to its ongoing refurbishment), receiving minimal funding and lost ticket sales last year due to extreme wintery weather caused by ‘the beast from the east’, have all contributed to its current financial straits. The festival has featured international names such as Dr John, Arturo Sandoval, Maceo Parker and Melody Gardot, alongside local heroes Andy Sheppard, Get The Blessing and Pee Wee Ellis (all pictured above) as well as countless new and emerging bands.

The festival’s artistic director Denny Illet commented on the decision to start the fundraising appeal: “In these challenging and confusing times, I feel we need entertaining now more than ever! With music being stripped away from school curriculums, funding for the arts at an all-time low and festivals, clubs and arts centres struggling to survive, we hope that you will join us in helping reverse this alarming trend by supporting our efforts to bring world class jazz and blues to Bristol, as well as continuing to provide creative opportunities to local musicians.”

The festival aims to raise £30,000 to ensure the future of the event, which has seen almost 3,000 local and international musicians perform, provided masterclasses and school workshops and attracted over 12,000 people annually to its free and ticketed events.

Mike Flynn

To support the festival and find out more about the campaign visit www.fundsurfer.com/bristoljazzandblues and www.bristoljazzandbluesfest.com

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

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letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

letters@jazzwise.com (Mike Flynn)

The full line-up for this year’s Manchester Jazz Festival has been announced with its new time slot of 23 to 27 May. While there’s fresh-faced talent aplenty, there are some big names in the mix too. These include former Miles Davis right-hand-man and bass hero Marcus Miller (pictured centre) who plays music from his funk-fueled recent album, Laid Black, (Bridgwater Hall, 24 May). Leading UK names include saxophonist Tim Garland (above right) and his chamber-jazz Weather Walker group (St Ann’s Church, 26 May); Julian Siegel Quartet and trio MalijaMark Lockheart, Liam Noble and Jasper Høiby (The Whiskey Jar, 23 and 27 May) and electro-jazzers Roller Trio get busy on a double-bill with Werkha, (The Bread Shed, 26 May).

The festival’s topical ‘Celebrating Europe’ strand spotlights the likes of Italian bandleader/double-bassists Giulia Valle and Federica Michisanti, French electronica vocalist Leïla Martial (above left), Danish band Equilibrium and Turkish/Romanian duo Sanem Kalfa and George Dumitriu with concerts across the weekend. There’s also an explosion of new music from a dizzying array of adventurous home-grown jazz from the likes of the guitar-led Flying Machines; spiky proggers Taupe; boisterous brass groovers Young Pilgrims and cerebral drum’n’bass sounds from Trampette, among many others. Running at venues across the city, the festival will be partnering with the Manchester Food & Drink Festival for the first time, with a wide variety of food stalls around the festival hub at St Ann’s Square.

Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets visit www.manchesterjazz.com

from News http://bit.ly/2VyU071
via IFTTT

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