Search

mandersmedia music shop

Retailers of music on Vinyl, CD, Cassette and other formats on Discogs

Tag

Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise

Alex Ross For David Elliott

David Elliott, the longtime mainstay of WHRB, the Harvard radio station, died yesterday at the age of seventy-eight, after a two-year struggle with ALS. For decades, David had been a pillar of the Boston classical-music scene, conducting countless interviews on his Monday-night program. His devotion to WHRB as an institution was absolute and selfless. At several crucial moments, he saved the station at a time when the Harvard administration was not particularly concerned about its fate. Under his guidance, WHRB became a place of musical discovery for generation after generation of undergraduates. So it was for me. My career and life would have been completely different without David’s intervention.
I came to Harvard in the fall of 1986 and tried out for WHRB the following spring, with the encouragement of my freshman roommate, Jon Lehrich — who, as it happens, has succeeded David as the chair of the station’s board of trustees. David immediately noticed me as someone who was unusually interested in new music, music history, and recordings, and encouraged me at every turn. In 1988, he had the idea of adding record reviews to the WHRB Program Guide. I now realize that he was opening a path for me even without my knowing it. On a more personal level, I was then a troubled and self-destructive kid, as the photograph above hints, and David was one of two adults on the campus — the other was Robert Kiely — who gave me wise and gentle guidance. I owe him an incalculable debt, and mourn his loss alongside countless others.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/35pCx4i
via IFTTT

Alex Ross More young-adult Wagner

I received a wonderful book-finishing gift from my colleague and friend Will Robin: a short illustrated version of Wagner’s Ring, published in 1964, with illustrations by Warren Chappell and text by none other than John Updike. A section of Wagnerism is devoted to the curious spate of children’s and young-adult Wagner books that came out around 1900, often with creatively bowdlerized treatments of the plots. The titles include Anna Alice Chapin, Wonder Tales from Wagner and The Story of the Rhinegold, Grace Edson Barber’s Wagner Opera Stories, Florence Akin’s Opera Stories from Wagner, Dolores Bacon’s Operas That Every Child Should Know, Constance Maud’s Wagner’s Heroes and Wagner’s Heroines, William Henry Frost’s The Wagner Story Boo, and  J. Walker McSpadden’s Stories from Wagner. (McSpadden also wrote Famous Dogs in Fiction and Ohio: A Romantic Story for Young People.) In these retellings, fewer mishaps befall the characters: Akin allows both Siegfried and Brünnhilde to survive. My favorite evasion of Wagnerian difficulty comes from Chapin, describing Siegmund and Sieglinde: “They loved each other as much as though they had been really brother and sister.”
Updike, who evidently wrote his story for the benefit of his sons David and Michael (so the dedication suggests), makes his own adjustments to the tragic plot of the Ring. Although he does not hide the incestuous relationship between the twins, he passes over the story quite hastily: “Their life was unhappy, but before they died, they had a son, Siegfried, who has been raised in the deep forest by a kind and clever dwarf.” When Siegfried takes the Ring from Fafner, he does not kill Mime but simply walks away: “So small do greedy people seem to a man filled with the music of love.” And the entire action of Götterdämmerung is confined to a couple of extremely vague sentences at the end: “Siegfried and Brunhilda knew joy in one another, but did not live happily ever after. No human beings do. In time they died, and in dying returned the Ring to the mermaids of the Ring, where to this day the gold may be seen gliterring — though people say it is just the sun mixing with the water.”

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/3oL6nry
via IFTTT

Alex Ross Yuval Sharon’s Twilight: Gods

Garage Band. The New Yorker, Oct. 26, 2020.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/2HKvHNT
via IFTTT

Alex Ross Nightafternight playlist

New and recent releases of interest.
Ash Fure, Something to Hunt; International Contemporary Ensemble, Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra, Nate Wooley, Rebekah Heller, Brandon Lopez (Sound American)
Clara Iannotta, Earthing; JACK Quartet (Wergo)
Sarah Hennies, Spectral Malsconcities, Unsettle; Bearthoven, Bent Duo (New World)
Du Yun, A Cockroach’s Tarantella; Du Yun, JACK Quartet (Modern Sky)
Experiments in Living: Music of Brahms, Schoenberg, Crawford Seeger, Pluta, Cheung, Charmaine Lee, George Lewis; Spektral Quartet, with Claire Chase (New Focus)
Bára Gísladóttir, HĪBER (Dacapo)
Sarah Davachi, Cantus, Descant (Late Music)
Jürg Frey, l’air, l’instant; Reinier van Houdt, Dante Boon (Elsewhere)
Ives, Symphonies Nos. 1–4; Gustavo Dudamel conducting the LA Philharmonic (DG)
Encounter: Music of Bach/Busoni, Brahms/Reger, Reger/Becker, Morton Feldman; Igor Levit (Sony)
Silver Age: Music of Scriabin, Prokofiev, Stravinsky; Daniil Trifonov, Valery Gergiev conducting the Mariinsky Orchestra (DG)
Voices of the Wilderess: Music of the Ephrata Cloister; Elizabeth Bates, Clifton Massey, Nils Neubert, Steven Hrycelak, Christopher Dylan Herbert directing (Bright Shiny Things; out Nov. 20)

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/2TF5sdM
via IFTTT

Alex Ross George Lewis in Berlin

George Lewis, a pivotal figure in early twenty-first century American music, is spending the academic year in Berlin, on a fellowship at the Wissenschaftskolleg. He will be completing his new chamber opera Comet/Poppea, a hybrid work combining a setting of W. E. B. Du Bois’s sci-fi story “The Comet” with an adaptation of Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea. Yuval Sharon will direct the inaugural production in New York and Long Beach in June 2021. While in Europe, Lewis will be collaborating with two renowned ensembles: first, the London Sinfonietta, for which he has co-curated — with Elaine Mitchener — a program of Jason Yarde, Leila Adu-Gilmore, Hannah Kendall, Tania León, Courtney Bryan, and Lewis himself (Oct. 28); and the Ensemble Modern, for which he has assembled an “Afro-Modernism” lineup of Alvin Singleton, Jessie Cox, Daniel Kidane, Andile Khumalo, and Kendall and León again (Nov. 7 in Essen, Nov. 13 in Frankfurt). The Sinfonietta concert will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3; whether any of the Modern material will travel the airwaves is unclear.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/35s9dsC
via IFTTT

Alex Ross Billy Budd, Beau Travail

Djibouti, January 2000.
A Cultural Comment on the New Yorker website, Oct. 20, 2020.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/37x1WKU
via IFTTT

Alex Ross Jennifer Walshe

Sublime Chaos. The New Yorker, Oct. 26, 2020.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/2Hk3wVJ
via IFTTT

Alex Ross Julian Anderson on The Rest Is Noise

I have been reading with much enjoyment Dialogues on Listening, Composing, and Culture, a new book of conversations between Julian Anderson and Christopher Dingle. I was, however, somewhat nonplussed to come across Anderson saying this of my book The Rest Is Noise: “It has its points and it’s lively, though there are huge areas of music, like Sibelius and Nielsen and all sorts of contemporary composers that are either barely mentioned, or neglected.” One of my fifteen chapters is, in fact, devoted almost exclusively to Sibelius. Not only that, in a discussion of Tapiola I quote from Anderson’s excellent article “Sibelius and Contemporary Music.” But so it goes.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/36NYDi2
via IFTTT

Alex Ross A Bára Gísladóttir moment

From her new album HĪBER, on dacapo.

from Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise https://ift.tt/339mc2s
via IFTTT

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: